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How to create a gold text/graphic effect?

Feb 9, 2009 4:30 AM

Hi. I have created a logo element with the text in Illustrator and i need it to be in gold. How do i do this? Can it be done in Illustrator or Photoshop? I don't like using photoshop... Thank you in advance for your help.
 
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    Feb 9, 2009 5:54 AM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    You really can't duplicate a gold effect with RGB or CMYK colors. The metallic nature of gold really calls for a metallic ink. Your best simulation will be a gradient with dark brown, to a dirty yellow (gold color) and back to another brown, not exactly the same as the first. Angling the gradient may help.
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 6:25 AM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    Natalie,

    I'm not 100% sure what you mean by "i need it to be in gold".

    If you are talking about actually printing gold ink, you need to create a separate channel to represent the art to print in gold. Choose one of the Pantone golds, but understand that it will appear rather ungold-like on screen. But it will accurately represent the portion of your art that is to be printed in that color. The actual gold ink used would be selected by you and/or your printer, and it will print properly.

    But if you are looking to simulate the metallic appearance, but print in the standard CMYK colors, you need to be a bit of an artist to create the highlights and shadows of the shiny metal. You can do this in Photoshop or Illustrator -- but you should have some tear sheets of, say, jewelry, coins, or other gold objects that you can use to help to simulate the effect.

    Neil
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 9:29 AM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    And then there are foil stamps, very nice high-end stuff. There are a few different ways to try to pull-off a gold look. Aside from the gradients already mentioned, you could try a flat color like 30C, 100Y. But, you've left the discussion wide open when you neglected to specify what exactly it is you are trying to do. I'd use Illustrator per Neil's suggestion if you plan on using a spot gold or a foil stamp or a gradient because all of the elements can remain vector for sizing flexibility.
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 10:14 AM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    John,

    I agree with your comments, except that 30c+100y is a bit greenish. Most gold I see is warmer toned. And for 4/C simulation, there is no single flat tone that could believably simulate gold.

    Neil
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 10:25 AM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    John,

    I agree with your comments, except that 30c+100y is a bit greenish. Most gold I see is warmer toned. For 4/C simulation, there is no single flat tone that can believably simulate gold. For example, see the gold coins in my attachment. Note that a combination of tones is needed.

    Neil
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 1:08 PM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    Er, I meant 30M + 100Y. Great she can get the printer to do it, should come out pristine.
     
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    Feb 9, 2009 5:37 PM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    John,

    You omitted a smiley in that post! Hopefully, Natalie will study use the posts here as a jumping off point.

    Neil
     
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    Feb 10, 2009 12:18 PM   in reply to (Natalie_Weber)
    Natalie,

    A metallic gradient may go to (almost) white, especially if the adjacent part is made steeper, dragging the midpoints (the diamonds above the slider) closer (Illy speak).

    Obviously, the appearance/colour of gold depends on the alloying, the light, and the surroundings, from greenish to reddish.

    And equally obviously, the appearance in print must meet expectation rather than reality, for most people pure yellow or with a reddish (more copper) rather than a greenish (more silver) tinge.
     
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