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Why I should upgrade to CS4?

Oct 22, 2008 11:52 AM

  Latest reply: Skullmaker, Oct 31, 2009 6:45 PM
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 28, 2008 7:04 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Yes it is :)
     
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    Oct 29, 2008 7:09 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    MOM! Chris is teasing me again!

    :) Mordy
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2008 5:23 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    As a novice trying to follow this thread and decide if I should upgrade from CS2 - do many of these bugs stem from using CS3/CS4 with the Leopard OS? I am currently using a G5/Tiger and would try to remain on Tiger for CS4.

    Since I am a beginner, I cannot judge within a larger context if I should stay with CS2, or upgrade to CS4. Time is ticking since I am on a G5 and have the Education version of CS2. If I still want to qualify for the upgrade price I need to decide during this CS4 period.

    What do you think? Is CS4 solid enough to last many years into the future for a beginner such as myself? It makes more financial sense to pay for an upgrade version once in awhile than suddenly take a big hit many years down the road to purchase a full version. Adobe's policy really forces you to spend money when you might not want to becasue they only allow you to update from three versions back.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    Mike
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2008 6:47 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    I would say there are lost of things you can do with CS4 that makes life easier and the program more flexible I would recommend upgrading.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2008 4:00 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Thanks Wade

    If the performance of CS4 matches, or excceds CS2 for me on my G5 - I would be happy for many years to come. In fact, at my level, CS4 would do me for the next 7 + years. I like some of the features and performance improvements that people are saying within Illustrator, and especially Phototshop. The Blob tool seems very compelling to me for the way I think as an artist. Hopefully, I won't encounter too many of the bug issues discussed because I might not reach that level of sophistication of this forum's viewers.

    Is there anyone using CS4 on a G5 using Tiger? How do you find it's performance? More feed back on this would be enlightening.

    Once again, thanks for your consideration.

    Mike
     
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    Oct 30, 2008 5:17 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    I don't know of anyone here using a G5 with CS4 I do know some on the PS Forum and they have no problems with the performance.

    you might end up finding ore uses for Ai and PS and perhaps ID and Flash if you get the suite.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2008 5:32 AM   in reply to (Mike_from_Toronto)
    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 12:00:39 +0000, Mike from Toronto wrote:

    > Is there anyone using CS4 on a G5 using Tiger? How do you find it's
    > performance? More feed back on this would be enlightening.

    I've been toying with it since it arrived yesterday. Haven't had time to put
    it to work, but performance seems on a par with, if not better than, CS3.

    Bridge is much improved, by the way.

    --
    Michael

    mhphillips at gmail dot com
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2008 8:34 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    I don't know about using CS4 on a G5, but I would recommend the upgrade. The multiple art boards alone make the upgrade worthwhile and the revamped gradient tool is icing on the cake.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2008 11:59 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Thanks guys for your thoughts.

    I'll wai until halfway through the cycle, see what updates are released, and give the trial version a go - then make a decision. It's so tempting when Adobe is offering a reduced price if you purchase before February 28 - but only if it works for you in the way you need it to.

    Mike
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2008 12:21 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    If you wait you might be sorry about I know I have been when waiting to purchase.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 2, 2008 4:27 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Hello Hans,

    > But do you know by a fact that we got a bad deal with CS3 and no updates or
    > patches are going to be release? If that the case, what assurance do I have
    > that the next version is going to actually work correctly? The CS4 have bugs,
    > meaning another bad program that wont be fix, how can I know that CS5 it will
    > actually work correctly? Why I should trust Adobe?

    I think that's what the trial version is for: to give you the opportunity to
    download it, install it on a test machine, and see how it works for you,
    without committing to a purchase.

    Jeff
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 3, 2008 12:07 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    The other thing to think about is whether or not there are mission-critical bugs in CS4 like there were (no - ARE) in CS3. I have yet to hear about any.

    Anyone care to correct me?
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 3, 2008 2:40 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Hans - there is no such thing as a bug free application...
    CS4 though feels much more troublefree and stable than CS3 ever did (does). Particularly in Leopard.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 3, 2008 5:39 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    I don't know if I pointed this out to anyone on this thread but the outline stroke problem is not one hundred percent fixed. Outline a rectangle or circle path and you get 10 points. the rectangle is simple to fix with the pen tool. Delete the two extra points and you are left with the rectangle and 8 points. It is the outside lower right corner point and the inside lower left point which lies directly ove the extra points.

    The circle is a little different but can be fixed though a little more involved but I think it can be scripted to fix it as well.

    I have in the past long time ago wrote a couple of scripts for Illustrator and they worked but I have not done since I will give it a try.

    The circle it is the inside top point and the outside lower point holding the shift key you drag the point straight down the select the path connecting the two points then use the aligm panle to alin the point that is now lower of the two and then you join them.

    You now have the same circle but with 8 points.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 5, 2008 6:43 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Interesting read: http://www.creativepro.com/article/review-adobe-illustrator-cs4
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 5, 2008 6:31 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Hans you can do the work in CS4 quite well. But they did sneak the bug through to add two extra points to a closed path. But I don't know of a circumstance where this would interfere with doing your work in the same way as always.

    So where as it seems to be a bug it does not affect your work. So it is an is not a bug.

    However the improvements to illustrator far out weigh the importance f these two extra points.

    I know you are venting about Adobe but I am not certain it is at all founded and you yourself believe it.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 5, 2008 6:41 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Illustrator 8 was not bug free. But I do agree that Ai8.0.1 was, and it was the last bug free version released by Adobe.

    CS4 has very few bugs here. However, there may be functionality limitations depending upon what feature you are using. These are often called "bugs" by users when they really are not.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 5, 2008 6:51 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    There are many things abut AI CS4 that really enhance the work flow and one feature that has not gotten a lot of coverage solid to transparent gradients and transparent to transparent gradients.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 6, 2008 2:51 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    At least you got the second update to 13.02.

    Dutch users have been denied that entirely, leaving us with software that is 80% of the time - pretty unuseable.

    Adobe - the new Quark.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 6, 2008 9:39 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Hans - I have read the entire thread.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 7, 2008 7:25 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    There has never - NEVER - been a bug-free version of Illustrator. Depending on the kind of work you do - cartography, package design, web, spot color print, etc. - you may never see a bug that plagues the work of someone else. Thus, this forum has always been full of such characterizations as "bug-free" and "loaded with bugs." I tend to use the software that gets my work done best. If I encounter a suspected bug, I verify it (make sure it's reproducible by someone else), then report it, and then try to find a workaround. If I can't find one, I do my work without that feature.

    In the past, when a feature that previously worked fine was broken in the new version, I kept the old version around just for that task. Inconvenient? Yes. A deal killer? Not necessarily.

    I'm constantly evaluating the pros and cons of each new version of Illustrator. Is a new feature valuable enough to offset what I'm losing in productivity somewhere else? The answer is going to be different for every user, depending on what they need the application to do.

    For my work - which ranges from illustration to web design - every successive version of Illustrator since 1.1 has been better than the last, bugs notwithstanding. That is, there has been more to enhance my productivity than to hinder it. I have to think that my experience is probably similar to the vast majority of users, users who never visit the User to User forum to express dissatisfaction.

    Fortunately, you don't have to spend any money to find out if someone's reported bug - which may or may not be a verified bug - would be a deal-killer for you. Download the free trial, use it for 30 days and find out.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 12, 2008 3:29 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    You're Welcome!
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 4:33 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    > There has never - NEVER - been a bug-free version of Illustrator.

    That old song is nothing more than the digital equivalent of "nobody's perfect." It is no excuse for a software that contains bugs like the offset path/outline stroke fiasco (to name just one) to go completely uncorrected.

    These are not the kind of minor glitches appropriate to the long worn out "nobody's perfect" excuse. They are broken functionality that worked in the previous version, and are therefore expected to work in the new versions. They are at least expected to be corrected reasonably soon after the release of the new version. But in Illustrator's case, they increasingly are not.

    That's the gist of Hans's complain, and I think its quite legit. Adobe seems to have adopted a routine policy of each new release being followed as soon as possible by one or two minor bug fixes--and that's it--no more time spent, even if major bugs still exist. It's quite understandable that Hans is now dubious about trusting Adobe's software quality.

    He is not alone. I dare say I have been using most mainstream graphics software as long and as intensively as just about anyone here. My norm is to pre-order new releases of the leading titles, because I consider it a matter of professional responsibility to keep my software up-to-date. Yet uncorrected problems associated (especially with Illustrator, which I consider the weak link in Adobe's whole product line), together with general dissatisfaction with Adobe's chronically problematic installers and burdensome registration/activation schemes has left me quite gun-shy about upgrades.

    Hans's complaint echos those of many. Offhandedly dismissing it with a trite "nobody's perfect" just adds insult to the injury of Adobe's dismissive behavior re long-known, repeatedly-reported bugs in Illustrator.

    JET
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 5:27 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    It's what you can expect when a company manages to monopolise a market by buying up all its competitors. Once Freehand was killed us Illustrator users can be treated like dirt.

    The bug that stops illustrator clipboards working properly with inDesign was never fixed and there's still problems with inDesigns PDF export putting in the wrong filename. I think they must be taking advice from Steve Jobs cut and paste iPhone development team.

    Adobe may hate Apple for whatever reasons but there's no need to take it out on those who made Adobe successful in the first place - us the professional users of these apps since 1987.

    This bad business practice will cause problems now the downturn has started though. We have zero plans to upgrade to CS4. Main reason - Photoshop is not 64-bit on the Mac platform, and illustrator has nothing new to offer us other than an entire new gamut of bugs.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 10:00 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    mystmatt you really do want to upgrade, there has been a lot of things improved with this release. and there are lots of reasons for upgrading.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 12:05 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Apparently James didn't read beyond the first sentence of my post. Not only did I never use the term "nobody's perfect," but I did not offer anything as an excuse. All of Adobe's software has bugs. It's a fact. Depending on the kind of work you do, you may never encounter them. When you do, you may find a workaround that renders them only inconvenient. On the other hand, those bugs might make the kind of work you do impossible or unrealistically difficult to complete. I can appreciate your ire.

    Sure, I think Adobe should issue timely updates to fix bugs, especially bugs that slow down my productivity. Should they stop development on the next version to address bugs in the existing version? I think so. If they don't, and instead address those bugs in the next version, should I refuse to upgrade out of principle? Users will have to decide that for themselves.

    Speaking for myself, if the bug fix I've been waiting for doesn't arrive before the next version, and the next version offers me those fixes plus increased productivity, my decision is easy.

    Mystmatt - If Illustrator CS4 had nothing new to offer me but new bugs, I, too, would have zero plans to upgrade. Good thinking.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 1:06 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    um Wade, I'm extremely resistant to suggestion. Maybe you could give me some reasons.

    Point of fact - when an upgrade (for me) involves the purchase of 35 individual copies, it's got to be worth my while. If said company will not even offer essential and basic bug fixes because I use a non-standard language (Dutch) then seriously -where's the incentive? (see my thread on the fact that 13.02 was never offered to Dutch, Swedes and other top payers but small markets).
    If you're annoyed that 13.03 or 13.04 or even 13.1 (oh that'll be CS4) never materialised my English speaking friends, imagine the big fat middle finger that was offered to non massive market people like us.
    Stock-market greed means Adobe want to sell to new customers, as far as upgraders are annoying. It's kind of like the fact that your mobile company will offer the most amazing offers to new customers but the existing customers are lucky if they can get a new handset after 2 years of loyalty. This has happened because of the last few years of exaggerated growth. Watch these companies suffer in the coming 'time to tighten the belt' mentality.

    I'm a packaging designer, who's won over 4 awards - we make some of the complex artworks in the business. This is not good work Adobe.

    Just like with Quark Xpress - the moment a competitor offers better Service, better upgrades and better software - we jump and you lose. You (Adobe) once were that company, but you're in danger of becoming the same.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 3:05 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    mystmatt,

    here are the reasons, for the most part the bug with extra point for outline strok is gone the two instance where there is two extra points only probably means something if you know about it. Otherwise you can just go about your business or easily get rid of the extra two points.

    Here are more reason the gradient mesh bus is gone,

    Multiple artboards which can behave as multiple pages Or just to have many elements from a project in one document. The way it is implemented in AI is much superior then a page layout program IMO if you are not designing books and corporate brochures that have large numbers of pages.

    It gives you the possibility of having your art together as if it were a job ticket and the export or output it all at will in a variety of ways.

    Even save for the web. Along with the slice tool this makes it possible to build a whole website in one AI document, this of course will lead to a feature request for integration with Fireworks and Dreamweaver.

    Moving on the the blob brush offers you the opportunity of working with a tool that is much more like you would do if you were actually working with a paintbrush and it works very well with the eraser tool though that could be improved. This is an advance in the way we think about a vector program.

    he gradient tools have been upgrade to give you much more control with a visual reference as well as adding transparency to gradients.

    Along with the blob brush and Ai this make s life very interesting for instance you define a gradient and it has a total transparent stop that goes to a solid which the then goes to 50% transparent stop and then back to a solid and then to a complete transparent and then you make a swatch of that and start painting with your blob brush. So now you are painting on top of objects that you want to create a partially but random foreground.

    And there are other things tha can be done with the blob brush. Even paint with an effect present.

    Which brings us to this theme of saving the way the art reacts in different ways with one document. The effects can now be turned on and of in the effects panel so you can store effects for reuse with different versions of the artwork which can then be outputted in various ways.

    So when the client wants the shadow to be like you had it in the ad, and the pattern to be like you had it in the website and the way the color or the various strokes were in the video, well you make certain they understand this is a time consuming process involving several documents that have to integrated and it will cost plenty of money to do as well.

    And you take all that extra time you save take a walk and meet something young and Dutch and put that time to really good use.

    In case you did not get it all you have to do is turn on and off effects to create all the features you want displayed for that version of the art. Yu also have access to the color and stroke weight directly in the effect panel.

    Moving on if you can still move from all that workthat the young Dutch thing puts you throughthey are pretty healthy.

    The application frame which allows you to tab you documents hit a tab and there you are the document is in the front. I place the Bridge off to the side in a tall narrow configuration so I can access the desktop and files on by bringing the Bridge to the front and you can then drag and drop from the bridge directly to any of my open documents.

    This is very cool.

    Though I do not how helpful this is you can now scroll the panels content and there is a separation preview which is only helpful if you get rid for the unused swatches.

    BTW I might come to The Netherlands at the end of the month. To Almere to do some photography and see some of my photos in an architectural exhibit.

    The only way I know of of getting you to see the features is for you to look at some of ht tutorials. Or as I did for my client in Paris to install it on their computer, a;l bet an english version of the program.

    Or for you to download the trial. I think it is now available.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 15, 2008 4:22 PM   in reply to Skullmaker
    "It's what you can expect when a company manages to monopolise a market by buying up all its competitors. Once Freehand was killed us Illustrator users can be treated like dirt."

    Those days are long gone, my friend. Even when I was the Illustrator PM (I was hired during the Illustrator 9 timeframe), Adobe no longer considered Freehand a viable competitor. Macromedia "killed" FreeHand long before Adobe had the chance to do that. There was never a time that I can remember when we ever looked at FreeHand as any kind of threat.

    When I was PM, I always looked at Illustrator 8 as being our biggest competitor (I still think that previous versions of AI are the only viable competitor to today's versions). In fact, when we were working on performance-related issues, I instituted that during testing, we always compared performance to Illustrator 8 as part of our testing routines.

    But the game is different these days, and Adobe's move to shipping products in a combined Suite has been the cause. There are pros and cons to this (as with anything else), but I don't believe that innovation or quality have any part in that discussion at all. In fact, I believe that Adobe's testing and quality policies are better now than they've ever been -- and they have to be when you consider that the Master Collection contains close to 100 million lines of computer code.

    If you'll remember, back when CS3 shipped, we had a similar discussion to this, and I even blogged a summary about it -- which you can find here:

    http://rwillustrator.blogspot.com/2007/04/how-illustrator-gets-its-fea tures.html

    I actually think that the post is somewhat relevant, considering that at the time, we were lamenting about the lack of a separations preview panel in CS3 -- which just so happens to be a feature in CS4 :)

    :) Mordy
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 3:19 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Illustrator 8 certainly was the benchmark for a long time. We didn't bother version 9 for instance (we bought a few copies). I usually find you can ignore aevery second update and wait for the next version. This changed with the move to Intel - CS3 was necessary then.
    Freehand certainly became a mess but a hell of lot of designers could only use that software, we're still training our Design Director in illustrator CS3...

    CS4 full suite is winging it's way to me, I always want the latest stuff, it's a useful upgrade for what I do, the seps view is a long awaited feature (but then we can just open the CS3 ai in Acrobat and do the same thing anyway), but we won't be rolling it out across the whole company as we have a hotchpotch of platforms, the dual G5s work better with CS2 for instance. CS3 on those platforms is just terrible, lagging and slow but we've had to force them all to change to that recently and they are not happy with the bugs. A lot of our opertators hate change, and times are tough if you haven't noticed :)

    The fact that just like previous versions the Dutch won't be offered full bugfix versions beyond the 1st release is highly likely. And that my friend really sticks in my craw. In fact I'm not sure they're not breaking an agreement there.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 5:43 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    > Adobe no longer considered Freehand a viable competitor. Macromedia "killed" FreeHand long before Adobe had the chance to do that.

    > I always looked at Illustrator 8 as being our biggest competitor

    In the minds of customers FreeHand has always been Illustrator's primary competitor. (Evidenced in part by emotionally-devoted AI users' sensitivity to it.) I'm speaking functionality here, not market share. I don't think, any of the mainstream drawing programs (including FH) are what they ought to be in 2009, but compared to FreeHand 8, Illustrator 8 is a child's toy.

    Regarding just about everything except AI's being a full-blown Postscript interpreter, live vector effects (Brushes, etc.), and automation (macros, scripting), FreeHand still blows the doors off Illustrator in most areas that count every minute of every day:

    * Performance (text, redraw, launching, closing, stability)
    * Functional elegance (feature integration, consolidation)
    * Interface organization (inspector-based, fully contextual)
    * Interface consistency (options exist where & when expected)
    * Accuracy (snaps, dimension values)
    * Path drawing (greater capability, less tedium while drawing)
    * Drawing features (user-defined drawing scales, shape primitives, etc.)
    * Selection (fewer tools, greater functionality)
    * Text Handling (One elegantly designed textframe object does more, easier.)

    I couldn't even tolerate Illustrator 8 in its day for my day to day work. (AI 8 didn't even have a Fit To Page print option!) I could still do my work more comfortably and expediently in FH 8 or later.

    AI-only users don't have a clue as to what was lost when Adobe shut down FreeHand. Illustrator's copying of FH-ish functionality so far (with the possible exception of the decade-late multiple pages--jury's still out) has been quite weak:

    Alignment of anchorpoints. This (also decades-late) feature falls far short of the FreeHand functionality, because of Illustrator's inferior underlying selection scheme.

    Select Same, Magic Wand, etc. This convoluted, scattered functionality can't even come near what FreeHand's tightly integrated and concise Graphic Find & Replace can do.

    Selecting anchorPoints. In CS3, AI finally circumvented the infuriating need to continually deselect while manipulating paths. Experienced AI users praise it like it's the Great Awakening. Yet to proficient FH users, it's mere lip service toward FH's still vastly better path/point/segment selection/manipulation interface.

    Illustrator's success is NOT due to better functionality. It is due to its perceptional and marketing position relative to PostScript, Adobe, and PDF. Despite all its continually changing window-dressing, it is outdated, buggy, sluggish. Despite its focus on whiz-bang instant-eye-candy features, it still lags decades behind other drawing programs in fundamental drawing functionality.

    FH, having laid dormant since a year before Adobe's acquisition still provides these very practical and rightly expected functional superiorities over Illustrator:

    User defined drawing scales
    Reliable snaps (grid, points, guides)
    Proper corner radius command
    Geometric shape primitives
    Proper cutting tool
    More Grad types, all with on-object adjustment handles
    Join multiple paths (without tedously selecting endpoints)
    Better (more sensible, predictable, practical) path combination
    Reliable, comprehensive contextual properties inspector
    Autofitting text frames
    Proper paragraph rules
    Properly behaving paragraph styles
    Better Find/Replace text
    Better pathType interface
    Dedicated (and integrated) perspective drawing interface
    Graphic Find & Replace
    Proper ruler Guides (don't conflict with pasteboard bounds)
    Quick, easy, reliable select-through
    Bend/resume straight segments by dragging (without adding points)
    Repeatedly delete endpoints/resume
    Turn OFF auto join!
    Turn OFF fill open paths!
    Contact/enclose marquee selection choice
    Reliable palette positioning and workspace settings
    User-defined stroke weight presets
    Fully customizable toolbars
    Proper hairline stroke weight

    That's just off-the-top. The list goes on and on.

    How much has a long-time AI user paid over the years for AI and its decades-late functionality, its confused and scattered interface, its sluggish behavior, and lately, its uncorrected bugs?

    AI, still clinging to its archaic trappings, just can't catch up. I doubt very seriously that I will ever live to see AI match--let alone exceed, as it should--FH's efficiency and elegance. The fact that AI-devoted users deny, dismiss, or are just ignorant of FH's advantages doesn't change the fact that vector drawing has suffered a serious setback by FH's discontinuance. Too many will just never know.

    JET
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 5:56 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Good post James.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 6:37 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Inline graphics
    Uniformly-spaced path blends
    Proper arc tool (radius, start/end angles)
    Connector points (ensured tangency)
    Clipping paths don't loose fill/stroke when applied
    Reverse path(s) command
    Stray points seldom occur
    Clicking outside a textframe properly deselects it
    Snap sounds
    Create guides dialog
    Align all points in a path
    Align points to whole objects
    Better envelopes (create with retracted handles)
    Auto extend/retract handles on selected point(s)
    Custom arrowheads
    Math expressions in value fields
    All swatches "global"

    JET
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 6:50 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    Interestingly unexciting.

    zI know you think that these are really important issues and tools but if I selected any of these features that Illustrator lacks it would only be gradients and in line graphics that would be useful to me and I am not certain I would want them implemented in the same way as they were in Freehand.

    The inline graphics have to have lots of choice in order for them to be useful for me.

    The gradients are good the way they are in Illustrator but I would like to see a gradient effect that offer me the options rather then a gradient applied permanently to the object.
     
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    Nov 16, 2008 8:52 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    James - I think you forgot the suprior object styles and search and repalce object attributes.

    Wade - There are lots of things Freehand always did better than AI and AI stil has not caught up with it. Just admit it.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2008 10:04 AM   in reply to Skullmaker
    There you have it. Don't upgrade to CS4. Upgrade to the vastly superior Freehand.

    If upgrading to a still-existing Freehand were a possibility, I would definitely give it a look. But it's not, and now it's only spilled milk.

    For all its poor performance, inelegance, ugly interface, inaccuracy, tedious path drawing, and so on, somehow I'm able to get my work done in Illustrator.

    Rather than post endless lists of all the ways Freehand was superior to Illustrator (snap sounds?), I think you'd be more effective if you made feature requests for the things you think are most important, and try to get other users to support that feature. Adobe owns the Freehand code (they do, don't they?). If enough sentiment were directed at a particular item, perhaps the Illustrator engineers could be persuaded to take a look at it.
     
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