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Best for making event flyers: InDesign or Illustrator?

Dec 21, 2008 7:29 AM

Hi everyone, I am new here. I am a novice with Adobe products, but I do have the Creative Suite. I have used Illustrator tons and am very comfortable with it. I used InDesign once to make a pamphlet.

I am part of a charity group that often puts on events. I will be making all the flyers. Printing budget is low and will probably consist of going to Kinkos and printing on A4 paper. So these flyers are really not all that involved, but I want to make them the very best that they can be.

Now my question. Is it better to use InDesign or Illustrator to make the flyers?

And as a bonus, if you know of any sites that might give me inspiration to make flyers, I would appreciate it! I try to keep my eyes peeled and learn new things all the time. I want to give credibility to our group with the flyers, and I dont want them to look cheesy or home-made. Thanks for any tips you might have!
 
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    Dec 21, 2008 5:42 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Heather,

    Welcome to these Forums!

    If these are single page flyers, either one. For multipage work, InDesign.

    Take a look at Print magazine or Communication Arts magazine for getting creative juices going. I've been subscribing to both for decades!

    Neil
     
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    Dec 22, 2008 5:33 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    What's wrong with using both? <g><br /><br />Bob
     
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    Dec 22, 2008 6:58 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Of course, Illustrator elements can be included in an InDesign document.

    Neil
     
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    Dec 22, 2008 6:09 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Chances are, anyone looking at your piece, isn't going to be able to tell what software application you used to produce it. Using Illustrator doesn't mean your piece will look less impressive than had it been done in InDesign or vice-versa. You're comfortable with Illustrator, use Illustrator and don't sweat it.
     
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    Dec 23, 2008 12:36 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    John,

    My point was that for multipage documents, you're generally better off with the structure and workflow afforded by InDesign. For single page documents, of course, either way can work; and Illustrator-created elements work in InDesign, of course.

    Neil
     
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    Dec 23, 2008 1:12 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    The amount of text in the flier would be the determining factor for me. If there are any paragraphs of text, I would automatically use InDesign for its superior text handling.
     
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    Dec 24, 2008 6:27 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    > And thanks for not laughing at my question

    We try to never do that. We were all beginners once as well.
     
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    Dec 24, 2008 6:50 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Heather,

    As Don says. Most of us who volunteer some time here do so because we enjoy helping by sharing our knowledge and experience.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 19, 2009 8:24 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Hi
    here's a philosophical answer:
    The software you are most skilled at - is the best one to use ;-)
     
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    Mar 20, 2009 9:48 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    baad,

    Bad idea -- if it's the wrong software for the job.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 21, 2009 2:54 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    True. Foe example, some know their way around Powerpoint and use it as a graphics app as well as a presntation tool! Not good!

    Ian
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 4:56 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    And I remember the day when computers were new to my old University, and the application that drove installation was Lotus 1-2-3. Many people I taught were amazed when I showed them WordStar: they had been doing their word processing in Lotus.
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 5:12 AM   in reply to Don McCahill
    > they had been doing their word processing in Lotus.

    I still think AmiPro was the best word processor.

    Bob
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 5:28 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    Hello? Real world calling... If Ian knows his way around Illustrator what's wrong with using a software he knows? Moving from Ill. to InDesign is not as quickly done as Adobe claims. -and of course PPoint is not for making graphics... but that was not the question
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 9:52 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    I think what Neil was suggesting baad, is not to use just ANY app for the job if you know it. In other words, Photoshop is not the best tool for the job, so the advice, use whatever you know, is not the best advice if the person is only familiar with Photoshop. It may be wise in that case to learn Illy or InDesign.
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 3:20 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    baad,

    Stan has it right.
    >If Ian knows his way around Illustrator what's wrong with using a software he knows?

    But that is not what you said in post #11. Even so, as I said in post #1, Illustrator is fine for single- or double-sided flyers. But the more pages, the less suitable it is. A printer is not likely to accept a pile of single page or spread Illy files for a multipage document graciously.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 4:01 PM   in reply to Neil_Keller
    This exact question came up at work today. The person in question was
    ordering ID, but it was on the only program available for content
    creation for flyers, posters, and all artwork. I suggested that if only
    one program for artwork, posters, and flyers, I'd go with Illy. However,
    if I had my choice I'd go with the Design Standard package, since there
    are uses for Illy, PS, and ID (and of course Acrobat). In the end we
    will try to get the package, but the choice if ID or Illy depends upon
    not only what you need to do, but what other tools are available to help
    you out.

    I'd hate to do multi-page documents in Illy (or PS), but I'd also hate
    making ID my sole artwork program as well.

    Mike
     
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    Mar 23, 2009 7:30 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    I agree with Mike on the choices.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 5:07 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    >But that is not what you said in post #11.

    Neil, it appears that baad was posting the philosophical answer because Heather clearly stated "I have used Illustrator tons and am very comfortable with it." The answer is clear.

    Post #12 sent us on a tangent.

    ...and the comment about Tokyo indicates Illustrator is probably more ideal. It is a different design market there. I work on plenty of asian multi-page documents composed in Illustrator.
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 7:43 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    I once did a multi-page document in Illustrator before, what a nightmare. It was when I knew Quark but hated it, and before I knew InDesign. Oh if only it was around at that time....
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 9:07 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    From experience, I've found that in China and Japan, Illustrator (especially a lot of older versions of Illustrator) seem to be a favorite of printers. QuarkXPress and InDesign are less commonly used. It still doesn't change that it is neither designed for, nor is ideal for multipage jobs.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 9:29 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    It still does not change the fact that this thread is about a single page flyer. I'm still lost why we're throwing curve balls on this thread. Heather should use the app with which she is most familiar: Illustrator. There was no reason to correct post #11. Post #12 was the bad idea.
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 11:09 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    I don't recall Heather saying whether it was one page, two pages, or more. If it is either of the first two, there never was an argument.

    And you can attempt to argue ad infinitum about what you consider the merits or lack thereof of my prior posts. It won't change a thing.

    Neil
     
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    Mar 24, 2009 11:27 AM   in reply to (Heather_K)
    I'm not arguing with you Neil. I'm pointing out that a host should be a bit more intelligent than to assume baad was comparing any more than the two apps Heather was discussing. There's no need to shut folks down because you cannot comprehend their advice.
     
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    Apr 6, 2009 1:14 PM   in reply to (Heather_K)

    I'm sure there are many sources for inspriation, but I stumbled across this not too long ago: http://www.makebetterflyers.com/

     

    As for which is better, Illustrator or InDesign, I would not use Illustrator if there were a lot of text. As pointed out if you're comfortable with Illustrator use that. You might try doing the text in InDesign though... maybe you'll find you like it better!

     
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