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Crackling/Clicking Sound After Rendering

Apr 8, 2009 6:32 PM

I have Adobe Premiere Pro CS3 on Mac OS X 10.5 on a Macbook.

 

I have a Canon XH A1 camera and record voice and other audio using an iPod Nano with a stereo microphone, recording highest quality WAV file.

 

Once I get the audio all lined up with the video (usually requires speeding the audio up slightly to sync) everything looks great and sounds great in the preview. No noise at all in the audio...not in the original WAV file, in Premiere Pro or in the audio from the camera.

 

After going through Adobe Media Encoder, the MOV file I create has a clicking/crackling sound (kind of like old vinyl, but louder, quiet popping) any time the audio came from the iPod.

 

Settings are: Quicktime, H.264, 1280X720, quality at 100, 24 fps, AAC Audio @ 44khz.

 

The original WAV audio file is 16 bit, 1411 kbps, 44.100 khz stereo. Also no hissing, pops or crackles in an MP3 derived from the file in soundbooth.

 

I've seen a few threads where somebody else had a similar problem, but it was never resolved.

 

Any ideas?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2009 6:53 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    Welcome to the forums.

     

    This often happens when the volumeis too high. Reduce the volume on the clip or the master volume.

     

    Cheers

    Eddie

     
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    Apr 9, 2009 8:59 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    When you play the audio on the timeline do the master audio meters ever turn red?

     
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    Apr 9, 2009 9:28 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    This may sounds silly, but have you confirned the source audio isnt crackely to begin with?

     

    Edit; No; I see yousaid not in your first post.

     

    So; educate me how you made the wav file with an ipod.   The fact you had to alter the speed of the audio file makes my spider senses tingle.

     

    For giggles convert the wav file with soe utility  to an mp3 and see if that plays ok.

     
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    Apr 9, 2009 9:46 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    DustoneGT wrote:

     

    Putting the audio out to an MP3 gives good clear audio without the crackling sound.

    Then we know its how the wav file is being made that is the problem.   Since Im not familiar with the tools you are using to create the wav file, I dont think i can be much more assistance.

     
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    Apr 10, 2009 7:39 AM   in reply to DustoneGT

    The audio has to be sped up to 100.04% to match up with the video.

     

    I have the same problem (and solution) when I record audio separately using an iKey device.  But there are no issues with my exported sound.

     
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    Apr 10, 2009 12:59 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    I tried changing the project settings

     

    See: FAQ:How do I change the project settings?

    Cheers
    Eddie

     
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    Apr 10, 2009 4:28 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    Evidently the noise is being introduced when it goes from 44.1khz to 48khz during the rendering process.

     

    That is certainly not normal.  I can't think of any technical reason to explain it.

     
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    May 19, 2009 10:02 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    I'm having the same issue. I was doing voice overs with a small micro recorder, saving to MP3 and when I pop these into PPro CS3 it sounds fine on the timeline but whatever it is rendered to gives me pops and clicks and hiss as that audio that was provided in the way of an MP3 file plays in thoutput file.

     

    I'll investigate some of the things posted here and report back.

     

    Very annoying<grin>.

     
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    May 19, 2009 2:27 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    Jim wrote:

    >"I can't think of any technical reason to explain it."

     

    Oh, there are some technical reasons I can think of, but...

     

    Practical test (sort of taken "out of the blue"):

     

    Open the original sound file in for example SoundBooth. Apply a bandpass filter (high order) that preserves the sound of interest well. If voice, I would suggest 100Hz to 8kHz as a starter. Export to same as source (bits and. kHz), but if source is anything else than wave, select .wav as output.

     

    Now import the "bandpassed" version into Premiere and see if the exports are getting the same Crackling/Clicking.

     

    Dag

     
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    Nov 10, 2009 3:24 PM   in reply to DustoneGT

    The solution I used was importing my audio into Audition and running "auto click/pop eliminatior" on the clip. Then imported that audio clip in to Priemere and exchanged the original audio with the audio saved from Audition, and then relinked the video and audio.  Worked great.

     
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    Jun 20, 2011 9:29 AM   in reply to DustoneGT

    I had this problem for the first time too. I was able to eliminate it by removing my time stretch (my audio was at 100.1%). It seems that Premiere just sucks at time-stretching audio now. I suppose our solution is to use a different application to timestretch. or sync by chopping a few frames out here and there.

     
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    Jun 20, 2011 10:11 AM   in reply to TheRealQwertMan

    I wonder if the introductions of the "clicks & pops" could be due to Cuts that are not on Zero Crossings in the Audio?

     

    This ARTICLE goes into a bit more detail.

     

    In Audition, one can limit their Cuts to Zero Crossings (not sure about SoundBooth?), but as PrPro is a Video editor (with almost everything geared for Video), that also does some Audio editing, I do not think it has such a limit, unless it's been added very recently.

     

    Good luck, and hope that this helps someone in the future.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Sep 2, 2011 9:21 AM   in reply to TheRealQwertMan

    For me it was also time stretching of the audio file (a separate, non-video, WAV recorder).  Even at 100.01% it introduced pops, ticks, clicks, etc.

     

    I used Soundbooth to do the time adjustment then Premiere handled it fine from there.

     

    Erik

     
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