Skip navigation
agreen01
Currently Being Moderated

CMYK images in single/2 colour layout - how to?

Aug 11, 2009 3:00 PM

Using InDesign CS3, 504.

 

I'm creating a layout which will be offset printed either single (green and tints thereof) or 2 colour (the green+black and tints thereof) on white stock.  I'm a beginner single/2 colour user, and I'm not sure how I should deal with 4x CMYK images which need to be placed into my layout.  The images are company logos.  All images should be visible below as I inserted them into this post.

 

Should they be converted to tints of my single colour?  If so, what's the best way to do that?  And what format should they be?

 

Or if the client decides on 2 colours, what should I do?  Convert them to tints of black?  Would that be grayscale?

 

Any help much appreciated.

 

Tuffins Making a difference image_edited.jpg

Tuffins Ludlow Logo high res.jpg

LTC logo.jpg

 

acaster logo.jpg

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2009 3:13 PM   in reply to agreen01

    For a one-color job (technically "monochrome") you have two options. The easiest is ... set your text in black, and leave the images unchanged -- even if it's going to be printed in green! In that case, you should notify your printer the images should not be color separated. He will understand, and his machine will convert them to grayscale. The color comes out of a can, and it does not matter if it's green or black. You should make your own text black, because if you make it green, it will also be converted into a shade of gray.

    The drawback is that you cannot show your client a correct PDF preview (and you might have to repeat this story to him).

     

    The second option is convert all images to grayscale, using Photoshop (a breeze) or Illustrator (for vectors -- a lot more work). A word of warning: if you use the Photoshop "Convert to gray scale" filter, the actual image still stays RGB or CMYK. Do not forget to physically convert to grayscale in the Image -> Mode menu.

     

    If you saved the images as grayscale, you can place them as usual in InDesign, and if you need them green, select the open arrow and click on them. InDesign reports its 'color' as Black; you can change it to green using the same swatch as you used for your text.

     

    Two-color is a lot more work. You still need Photoshop and/or Illustrator, but then you have to manually change some parts to black (/gray) and others to green / a shade of green. You also need to take care only to use the same spot color green as you do in InDesign -- for Photoshop, you need a grayscale image with an added color channel.

     

    Looking at the logos, it's virtually impossible to change them accurately into just two colors ... (the Acaster one being the exception). Personally, I'd advise a monochromatic approach.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2009 5:13 PM   in reply to agreen01

    You should ask the client if there are already exisiting grayscale or two-color versions of these logos. No point in re-inventing the wheel if the work is already done and the client is happy with the tones. The good news is you can use Ink Manager to alias one spot color to another in ID, so even if the logos are in the wrong spot colors, you can still use them.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2009 7:44 PM   in reply to agreen01

    Another option for 2 colour which I don't think anyone has mentioned is Duotone, the easiest way by far is Photoshop, use, Image>Mode, you will have to convert to greyscale first, then Duotone.  You get to pick two colours and Photoshop mixes them up...

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2009 11:39 PM   in reply to Stix Hart

    Talk to your client. They may, without realising it, be asking for a solution which would involve a huge amount of work (get paid for it, if so!) - of some elements of the logo in black, some in green. As mentioned, nigh-on impossible with some of these. Or they may be entirely happy with greyscale versions, which might already exist, assigned to either black or green in the document.


    I usually tell such clients that each image will either be shades of black or shades of green - do they realise this and are they OK with it? Make sure you use a spot colour so as to only produce two plates, green and black (which will, of course be both black until the specified ink is applied on the press).


    Check on the printer being used - creating specified spot colours, eg a 'corporate' colour can incur extra charges if a 4-colour press is being used.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 10:42 AM   in reply to Kath-H

    I wouldn't print anyone's logo in a random color without their specific permission. I would push your client to have black as one of the colors to accomodate grayscale logos.

    Jay

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 10:44 AM   in reply to Jay Chevako

    I was assuming that 'black and a specific colour' had been agreed, sorry if I jumped the gun - nor would I

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 10:55 AM   in reply to agreen01

    What is the native program these logos were built it?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 11:02 AM   in reply to Kath-H

    Kath-H wrote:

     

    I was assuming that 'black and a specific colour' had been agreed, sorry if I jumped the gun - nor would I

    I'm making an assuption too, that it's the clients brochure, but they are putting their clients logos in it. If this is the case then it's the all of the client's clients that you would need to get specific permission to change the color of their logo. Grayscale would be much safer.

    Jay

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 11:08 AM   in reply to Jay Chevako

    Very true. Some organisations are much stricter than others on how their logos may appear.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 12, 2009 4:34 PM   in reply to agreen01

    Let your client know your concerns and have them sign offf on the final proof.

    Jay

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 22, 2010 1:52 PM   in reply to agreen01

    In Photoshop go to Image -> Adjustments -> Channel Mixer & click the 'monochrome' checkbox. You'll see the image is now grey scale without any Cyan, Magenta & Yellow. You can confirm this by running the eyedropper tool on your image & checking the percentage of C,M & Y in the information window. They'll all be 0% and only the percentage of 'K' (black) will change. This means that now your offset printer will only need to use a single plate of black color to print the grey scale image.

    You may further fine tune your image by adjusting its Brightness/Contrast.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points