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Adobe Premiere Pro CS3 MKV support?

Aug 1, 2008 11:14 AM

Is there any way to get Adobe Premiere to support MKV files or it simply just doesn't support it?
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    Aug 1, 2008 11:17 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    FAQ: How do I import xyz format files?


    Cheers
    Eddie

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    Aug 1, 2008 12:01 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    I thought it answered the question very well, even without specifically referencing .mkv files.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 12:14 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    > whoever wrote that just called everyone an idiot instead of admitting the deficiencies of the program.

    How right he was and how wrong are you calling it deficiencies. You obviously don't know the program, nor it's intended use. Anyone using an obscure wrapper like Matroska better use freeware or shareware to edit, not a professional program.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 12:38 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    OK, the short answer is it is impossible.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 1:22 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    There are a lot of formats that are not appropriate for Premiere Pro. Some should be included, some perhaps not.

    The main goal of Premiere Pro is to edit video imported or captured directly from a video camera.

    There are no video cameras at this time that use the Matroska format.

    Hence, it would be inappropriate for the codec to be added to Premiere Pro until after all of the other codecs that cameras actually use are included.

    Make sense?

    Besides, that format is not designed to be edited, merely played back to be watched.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 1:52 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    I didn't say it would be wrong, just expensive. You are the only person to ever ask for it. Therefore, I doubt that it is appropriate to take all that time to code in a new codec for one person.

    If enough people asked for it, then that would be different.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 2:03 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    David,

    Adobe cannot possibly cover every possible file format. Photoshop has slowly added formats, as their use has increased to the point that it makes it sensible to do so. The same for Premiere, but it has been slower, as file formats in video seem to fade very rapidly.

    The Matroska format is meant as a delivery format. Delivery formats are usually not meant to be edited. If a broad enough base of cameras used this format, pressure would be applied to Adobe to include it. Now, Premiere does not handle DivX, VidX, Vivio, and a host of other formats, regardless of which CODECs are installed on a system. Even Premiere's little brother Elements, a consumer application, does a poor job with many consumer formats, other than DV-AVI. It has real problems with .MOD files, and there are at least two popular camera companies, whose consumer models use this format.

    There are many camera formats that are also not supported, yet. I'd think that Adobe would be putting their resources to work on them first, depending on how large each format's user-base is.

    Give it time. If it becomes popular, then maybe Elements will incorporate it into its list of supported formats, but I'll bet not before they handle .MOD files.

    I do not even know if any of my file converters handle .MKV files.

    Hunt
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 2:25 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    >Since when is it correct for a professional program not to support formats that freeware would support?

    Professional products being limited to professional assets is quiet common. There are a host of audio and video hardware that will only accept signals from a professional connection - like XLR for audio or BNC from video. I don't find it at all surprising that a professional NLE acts much the same way, working only with more professional media.

    >The designed or not designed to be edited doesn't matter.

    It actually does, from a software programming standpoint.

    >you'd want to import some clips you might have of some cartoon if its a clip for a baby's birthday or something.

    Most people doing those kinds of home videos are probably using Premiere Elements anyway. It's more oriented towards the non-professional.

    >What's wrong with the MKV format, I don't get it

    Then you would fall under the category of non-professional as described in the link supplied by Eddie, and should probably follow the advice given for such. Doing so doesn't make you an idiot, it just means you're untrained. And the easiest method for the untrained to achieve their goal is to use other, more consumer oriented software.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 2:28 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    I know well that these forums are no real place to discuss out feature wish-list for Premiere, but high on this list (for me) is native AviSynth input support. There is a plugin available, but built-in support would be better and more stable. (After Effects CS3 has it: Why not Premiere?)

    AviSynth can be the vehicle by which almost any other format can be imported, including MKV.

    David -- If you're already AviSynth savvy (and if you're into AMV then you probably should be), then this will be no problem for you. I believe you can simply create a script like...
    DirectShowSource("filename.mkv")
    ... and import that into PPro with the avs import plugin above.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 2:39 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    >What I meant was that no matter what the format was designed for, the goal of editing software should be to be able to edit the video.

    But if the format wasn't designed with editing in mind, it makes it that much harder to design software that can edit it.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 4:41 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    I don't know that format, but others have said it is for delivery and not editing... so, read here to see Why NOT to try and edit an MPEG for a possible reason
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 6:10 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    Sidebar:

    >native AviSynth input support. (After Effects CS3 has it: Why not Premiere?)

    Define native AviSynth support, please. On my system AECS3 won't import .avs scripts. ;)

    EDIT: I suspect that you installed the plugin to the Adobe\Common\Plug-ins\CS3\MediaCore folder. When I did that, AE imported .avs scripts quite nicely, thank you.
     
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    Aug 1, 2008 8:18 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    Oops.. maybe I forgot ! I do s**t like that sometimes :)
     
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    Sep 8, 2008 8:00 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    Hi,
    sorry for resurrecting this not-so-new thread.
    I have installed the plugin in the Adobe\Common\Plug-ins\CS3\MediaCore folder, but AE crashes when I import the .avs file.
    I am running AE CS3 on XP SP3.
    Does anyone have a hint?
    Thanx
     
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    Jan 18, 2009 7:53 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    Hi,
    sorry for re-resurrecting this not-so-new thread. You support .mov and .AVI files but not .MKV? .Avi files where never meant to be edited. It would do a lot of good to Adobes reputation if it supported MKV, after all how hard could it be to implement an open format?
     
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    Jan 18, 2009 7:55 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    This will sound rude, and I genuinely mean no disrespect, but I have to say that you really don't know what you're talking about.
     
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    Jan 18, 2009 8:02 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    Audio Video Interleave, known by its acronym AVI, is a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a standard container that allows *synchronous audio-with-video playback*.

    ehem... 1992. playback...

    one of matroskas goal is to: Establish Matroska as the opensource alternative to existing containers such as AVI, ASF, MOV, RM, MP4, MPG

    Adobe opened up the pdf format, adobe is just notch below google as a simbol of good under the public eye. mkv would only improve that image.
     
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    Jan 18, 2009 8:10 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    >ehem... 1992. playback...

    Yeah, you're reading too much into that.

    And what Matroska hopes to be and what it's place really is the current world of computer media are two very different things.
     
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    Jan 18, 2009 11:49 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)
    I'm not particularly 'against' Matroska files. But the reality is that at this point in time, they're pretty much a non-existant format in the world of editing. (Hell even in the world of consumer playback, they're very rare).

    Masking in video is called a Matte. Premiere has this ability. If you mean rotoscoping, then yes, that's something Premiere can't do automatically. (But then even Hollywood uses special tools for this, doing it one frame at a time.)
     
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    Apr 15, 2009 11:09 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Hi Jim Simon - I told you we've had this conversation before, lol - or at least a very similar one.  When I signed in recently, it asked for a username for some reason. I entered Typhoon859 but technically it's the same account.  This is David "Kozar".

     

    -Sorry for giving birth to this thread again but.. in a similar respect, this thread was continued here: http://forums.adobe.com/thread/419411?tstart=0
    Just trying to point out that nothing ever changes XD

     
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    Apr 17, 2009 5:50 AM   in reply to Typhoon859

    Not until Premiere programmers add support, anyway.

     
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    Aug 13, 2009 11:36 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Hi. Sorry to revive this discussion again, but scanning through I think my specific question isn't quite answered:

     

    I have a client who would like me to deliver in MKV format. Their playback system works best with that format, so it's what they want. (Just to be absolutely clear, I have no desire to edit MKV, I just want to export to that format.)

     

    From what I have been able to find on other forums and FAQs, it looks like the thing to do is to export to some other format (AVI?) and use a freeware program to transmux to MKV. That seems a bit dodgy to me, but that's what I'll do if necessary. I would think it would be better to export directly from Premiere, so if anyone is aware of a plugin for this, I'm all ears.

     

    Thanks!

     
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    Aug 13, 2009 11:42 AM   in reply to FionaCurrie

    This CONVERTER has gotten some good reviews on other fora.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 1:41 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Harm Millaard.... that's a pretty ignorant post. You do know that Matroska is being used by consumers (with over 40+ million downloads), as well as being used by CE companies like LG, Panasonic, Mitsubishi, Western Digital, Sigma Designs, DivX just to name a few. In production is being used for Film Daily's, TV Series Tagging and Storage, Movie Production, Content delivery, again... just to name a few.

     

    My point is get the facts straight as its far from obsure (imho)... and adding to to APP is a must.

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 2:03 AM   in reply to corecodec
    You do know that Matroska is being used by consumers (with over 40+ million downloads)

     

    That is why PR does not support it. PR is for professional formats and PE is more suited for consumers.

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 7:48 AM   in reply to corecodec

    its far from obsure (imho).

     

    I would have to disagree. In the overall world of video, Matroska is extraordinarily rare compared to other file formats like .avi, mov, the various MPEGs and even .mxf.  It's but a tiny blip on the video radar.

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 8:12 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    I should have clarified the point I meant "imho" is from a design perspective it has always been made for 'professionals' (Some of us are in the production field for broadcast TV) and with 3 years since our last release is Matroska 1.0 is pretty bullet proof in it's design and flexability. We do have a ways to go before we release 2.0 with better support for streaming and more advance menu support, but we do not want to hurt its current adoption rate and hence that we feel that is way past time for Premiere to support it.

     

    We invite discusions on the opportunity and would even dedicate an engineer to make this happen. If anyone wants to see the technical side of Matroska, visit here: http://www.matroska.org/technical/index.html

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 8:43 AM   in reply to corecodec
    We invite discusions on the opportunity and would even dedicate an engineer to make this happen.
    
    

    Other than for the edification of us "users," this forum would likely not be the best place to hold the discussion. Adobe presence here is very limited, if it exists at all. However, we users can always stand to be educated. We may find benefits from using MKV, or, as the poster who reopened this thread did, may find that one, or more, of our clients requests it.

     

    Many here handle the entire workflow and in so doing, determine the delivery package to their clients. Some, however, receive material, edit it, and then hand it off to someone else. These would be the most likely candidates, but the dictate for format comes from their clients, or from the next person in the production chain.

     

    Most of us here are always ready to learn something new. Heck, there was a time that I did not know what JPEG2000 was, not that I use it much, even today. DNG was once a new format to me. Many of the newer Video formats and CODEC's are still not part of my vernacular - yet, but then I don't encounter them away from the forum.

     

    I've read some articles on MKV, but have yet to grasp how it could help me. I feel that others are in the same boat. Can you give an abstract, that could give us "pointers" on the benefits?

     

    Hunt, always curious

     

    [Edit] As one who knows MKV, do you have any recommendations on how the poster, who re-opened this thread can best get their material into MKV format for delivery to their client? I made one rec., but it was based on suggestions in other fora and might not be the best route. Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.

     

    PS in the edit of this post, it looks like I may have lost the block quoted text. If so, it should read "We invite discusions on the opportunity and would even dedicate an engineer to make this happen."

     

     

     

    [Edit 2] Yep - block quote gone, but material still there. The first line of this post is the quote from the post to which I am replying - not my words, but another poster's. May have fixed it now. Or made it so ugly that no one will even bother with it...

     

    Message was edited by: the_wine_snob Added [Edit] and PS

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 8:27 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Thanks Wine Snob for your assistance.

     

    Sorry I reignited an old debate. My 2 cents is I think it comes down to the difference between production formats and delivery formats. A professional producer wouldn't use DVD source material to edit (well, unless really hard pressed!) but it's quite reasonable for a professional producer to want to export to DVD as a delivery format since that is a format that consumers can use. Or perhaps a more apt example would be the fact that Premiere Pro allows me to export 3GP files for mobile devices, definitely a consumer format that should never be imported for editing, but very useful to have available.

     

    From what I read, Matroska is intended as an end-user format - not intended to be re-edited, but I am told it gives high quality playback, e.g. for HD digital theatre. (I will find out for myself soon.) I don't think it's mainstream at all, but if it becomes more widespread, I think it would be reasonable for Adobe to add it to Media Encoder as an export option.

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 8:36 AM   in reply to FionaCurrie
    Sorry I reignited an old debate.

     

    Let's change that to "an old discussion."

     

    I only wish that I had more options for a converter. As I have never worked in this format, I cannot give you "first-hand" user info - only what I have read from others.

     

    Fortunately for me, the only oddities are usually with regard to the Assets that I get handed. They are always "the ONLY copy of that file on earth... " Most of my delivery is straight forward - produce an SD DVD-Video. That's why I know almost nothing on MKV, but am always ready to learn.

     

    I should have had the good sense to ask the poster, who recently responded to this thread for recs. on a converter/encoder for you. I assume that he/she at least has ties to MKV, so should also have knowledge of the best way to help you. I see that I need to make an [Edit] to one of my Replies, if still possible.

     

    Good luck, and please update this thread with what you find works best. Someday, someone will benefit, especially if MKV becomes more mainstream, as some hope.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Aug 14, 2009 9:04 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Ha! Yes "discussion" wouldbe the friendlier term.

    Like you I actually often need to deal with less-than-ideal source material (if it's a rare enough shot, I'll try to make it work.) Luckily in this case the source is great; it's just the delivery format I'm unfamiliar with. But I'm used to working on the bleeding edge, so I'm happy to be a guinea pig, try stuff out and repost my findings.

     
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    Sep 15, 2009 6:14 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    A simple way to use high definition video (h.264) in a Matroska Wrapper (MKV video) is to transcode it to M2TS using a free tool called:

    SmartLabs tsMuxeR.

     

    http://www.smlabs.net/tsmuxer_en.html

     

     

    3 simple steps to use the video:

     

    1: Open it

    2: Change profile level to 4.1

    3: Save and start muxing

     

     

    Here is a nice blog post with more information.

     

    http://www.bitburners.com/articles/convert-mkv-video-files-to-m2ts-for -playstation-3-using-tsmuxer/4015/

     

     

     

    In my opinion the reason why Premiere does not want to support MKV is because it is mainly used in the pirate world for copyrighted videos.

     

     

    Good luck and creativity! :-)

     
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