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Adobe Premiere Pro CS3 MKV support?

Aug 1, 2008 11:14 AM

  Latest reply: Jeff Bellune, Jun 5, 2012 3:13 AM
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 6:28 PM   in reply to NetBuzz

    Pirates? You are not thinking that small, are you? We here at CoreCodec have been pushed for Matroaka adoption for over 4 years now.... and it is supported within products by:

     

    - Toshiba

    - Panasonic

    - LG

    - Netgear

    - Samsung

    - ASUS

    - Motorola

    - JVC

    - Sigma Designs

    - Seagate

    - RMI

    - Western Digital

     

    Conveting as you are suggesting is not an option... TS and PS while good for streaming... is not really a 'great' container.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 6:36 PM   in reply to corecodec
    Pirates?

     

    While I do have to admit that I have not encountered MKV that often, all instances have been in the legit arena. Maybe there is use elsewhere, but none of my clients have brought material from that area.

     

    I've been following this thread for some time, as I always want to learn of newer CODEC's and technologies, because there is always a client, just around the corner, who will drop it on my desk.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 6:46 PM   in reply to corecodec

    Please dont put word in my mouth.

    I am not stating my personal opinion. Only what i think may be the reason why Adobe Premiere does not support MKV.

     

    I personally think MKV is a great container for video.

    Also i am currently using the CoreCodec to properly watch my AVCHD video taken with my personnal digital camera. So i respect your work.

     

     

    It is also my opinion that a thread should not be hijacked with debate or emotional matters especially when the creator of the thread is asking for a way to use MKV videos in Premiere.

     

    You may not agree with my method but its a simple one that only takes minutes with almost lossless quality when imported as far as i know.

    And it works!

     

    If anyone have a better solution i will be more than happy to use it...  If not please start your own thread.

     

    Have a good day

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 7:05 PM   in reply to NetBuzz
    It is also my opinion that a thread should not be hijacked with debate or emotional matters especially when the creator of the thread is asking for a way to use MKV videos in Premiere.

     

    This is a valid point. One consideration is that it is a "zombie" thread from 2008, and it was brought back to life by a recent post on the MKV CODEC/container. While emotional aspects are probably not germane to the discussion, methods of dealing with the CODEC/container would be.

     

    All comments on the techniques used to implement, or edit it, should be fair game.

     

    As I stated, I have followed it from the beginning, only to learn. I probably did not further that, with my observations, however accurate those might be for me, with my client relationships. Sorry for that.

     

    Just my $0.02.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 7:14 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    @Thewinesnob

     

    My message was in response to CoreCodec  :-)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2009 9:00 PM   in reply to NetBuzz
    My message was in response to CoreCodec  :-)

     

    I realize that, but I commented on my observations regarding the CODEC/container, so probably did not help things.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2011 9:24 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    HI ALL!

     

    I I have CS5 running in Win7 64bit. All I did was change the .mkv to .avi, dragged and dropped. No avisynth installed.

     

    Hope this helps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2011 9:40 AM   in reply to qmunikate

    I I have CS5 running in Win7 64bit. All I did was change the .mkv to .avi, dragged and dropped. No avisynth installed.

     

    I get the error message when trying to replicate this.

     

    "Unsupported format or damaged file"

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2011 9:59 AM   in reply to NetBuzz

    Success likely depends on what's in the file itself.  Both MKV and AVI are simply containers.  What's inside makes the critical difference.

     

    Bottom line, stick to using video you shot yourself with a supported camera format inside of Premiere Pro, and you should be fine.  Look for a consumer program to edit Internet downloads and other non-standard media.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 8:52 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    @ Jim Simon and Harm Millaard

     

     

     

    It's people like you that are destroying the internet. The original poster was simply asking if there is a way to import mkv format into Adobes $300 video editing software instead of using freeware. He didn't ask what your opinion on the format was and frankly no one really gives a crap.

     

     

    Since I’ve edited video for paying customers I’m what you could call a ‘professional’ using ‘professional software’ so here’s a conundrum maybe you ‘video format experts’ can answer. How can I, a video professional using professional $300 software that I paid for from my own pocket, edit my daughters first baby steps to upload via youtube so I can share this shorter, yet more touching, video with my parents whom reside abroad?

     

     

    If your answer doesn’t include a link to a plug-in, directions on importing mkv video or anything of that nature than please save it for another thread, because I doubt anyone stumbled upon here just to read criticism of certain video formats. Thank you.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 9:45 AM   in reply to fuwad84

    Reread #6. Already answered.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2011 6:50 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard
    6. Aug 1, 2008 1:38 PM in response to:                                     (David_Kozar)

     

    Re: Adobe Premiere Pro CS3 MKV support?

    OK, the short answer is it is impossible.

     

     

     

    [Personal attack deleted by moderator]

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:07 AM   in reply to fuwad84

    I don't know of any plug-in that will allow import of MKV files into Pr CS3.

     

    -Jeff

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:34 AM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Jeff,

     

    IIRC, there was another MKV thread, but I have not found a link (thought that I had mentioned above, but guess not), where a rep from the developer commented. I do not recall if the solution was a plug-in for use by PrPro, a stand-alone converter, or similar, but seem to recall a bit of a solution.

     

    As with this thread, much discussion was on the merits of MKV, and the developer's rep. did address some of that, but did have some comments, that might be useful to PrPro users.

     

    If I can track down that other thread, I'll reread it, and if there is something beyond a discussion on the uses of the CODEC, I will post that.

     

    Good luck to all,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:36 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks, Hunt.  It'd be great if there is a plug-in, but I don't know of any, free or pay.

     

    -Jeff

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:38 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Here is one ARTICLE from another forum, on conversion.

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - tried for an Edit, but was kicked out. Guess someone is Replying to my earlier post?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:42 AM   in reply to fuwad84
    How can I, a video professional using professional $300 software that I paid for from my own pocket, edit my daughters first baby steps to upload via youtube so I can share this shorter, yet more touching, video with my parents whom reside abroad?

     

    You need to rephrase the question, as any true professional would.  The short version would read:

     

    "How can I get the job done."

     

    One possible answer:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then use other software that will.

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then only use a camera that shoots in a standardized camera format.

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then convert it to something Premiere Pro can handle.

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, file a Feature Request, and wait a year or more hoping Adobe will incorporate support.  (Though the rarity of MKV files makes this unlikely.)

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then either become a programmer, or hire one, and create a plug-in that will allow it to.

     

    Yet another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then buy Adobe and as the new CEO, you can set the design agenda for Premiere Pro.

     

    You get the idea.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:43 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    Jeff and Mr. Hunt, Thank you both VERY VERY MUCH - you're both thousands of times helpful than either of the afformentioned 'experts' on video formats.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:56 AM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Jeff,

     

    The input was actually here, from CoreCodec, up in Reply #34. Then in Reply #39, a user had a suggestion for a conversion/transcoding option - no plug-in. In CoreCodec's reply is a link to the Matroska site, and there might be new, and better info there now. I'd follow that link, to see what's shaking.

     

    What messed up my memory was that the thread was resurrected several times, by a few posters. I thought that some of what I recalled was in separate threads.

     

    Sorry for the false alarm - it was all here.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 11:55 AM   in reply to fuwad84

    Thanks for the props, but to be fair I have to say that all I did was echo Harm's "it's impossible" comment, while leaving open the possibility that a plug-in existed that I didn't know about.

     

    I think conversion is your best bet, and if you have the right freeware (like maybe VirtualDub, AviSynth and DGMPGDec) you can probably do the conversion on the cheap.  For example, if DGMPGDec will open your MKV file, then you create a D2V index file, and use that as the source in an AviSynth script.  Then load the AviSynth script into VirtualDub and save it out as an AVI file.  I recommend the Lagarith or UT codecs for maximum quality.  Pr will import and edit the new AVI file just fine.

     

    -Jeff

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 12:05 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    You need to rephrase the question, as any true professional would.  The short version would read:

     

    "How can I get the job done."

     

    One possible answer:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then use other software that will. Sure, no sweat after investing my money, effort and time into Premiere.

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then only use a camera that shoots in a standardized camera format. Of course, use a different camera, I'll just fetch the $1200 I have lying around to purchase ANOTHER high quality video recorder that does work in a different format.

     

    Jim up to this point I'm going to venture that you're simply going to forward these needed monies into my paypal account. I mean, heck, if that's not your intention all along than you're going to look awfully stupid for suggesting options one and two.

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then convert it to something Premiere Pro can handle. Yes, lets convert ALL the video I record from now in Premiere. Could you please kindly point me towards the video conversion tool in my $300 video editing software, I assume that premier possess said capability as most any free video editing software have been able to do this for quite some time, which brings me to my 4th point….

     

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, file a Feature Request, and wait a year or more hoping Adobe will incorporate support.  (Though the rarity of MKV files makes this unlikely.) I’m sure they will, after all Adobe has every reason to quickly corner the market on innovation considering how competitive the video, photo, flash and .PDF editing market is. Unfortunately by that time it won’t be my issue anymore.

     

     

    Another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then either become a programmer, or hire one, and create a plug-in that will allow it to. Or while I’m at it maybe a key generator, so potential professional customers like myself can try out the software before making a really big mistake like I did.

     

     

    Yet another:  If Premiere Pro won't handle your footage, then buy Adobe and as the new CEO, you can set the design agenda for Premiere Pro. Why Jim, that’s your best, most logical answer yet!

     

    You get the idea. I think we all do Jim, I think we all do.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 12:15 PM   in reply to fuwad84

    I actually don't think you do.  The point is to get the job done.

     

    My suggestions make that possible.  Find the one that suites you best, or whine about it and never finish the job.

     

    Your choice.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 1:43 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Wow, this thread is ever more interesting than its primary subject!!  A real Soap!!

    Also thanks for the suggestions!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2011 1:49 PM   in reply to fuwad84
    lets convert ALL the video I record from now in Premiere.

    Are you using a camera that records MKV files?  Which camera is it?

     

    Can you use the free tool MediaInfo to find out which codec is contained in that MKV wrapper from your camera?

     

    -Jeff

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 16, 2011 6:38 AM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    The real explanation as to why Adobe won't support the Matroska MKV container is of course that they simply don't like it. I bet this reluctance has something to do with making money. If Matroska (or FLAC or OGG) was in fact supported natively by any Apple, Microsoft, Sony, Adobe (or any other major MPEG-LA member) product, many users would use it instead of MP4, M4V, MOV, F4V and other commercial standards falsely being marketed (via the ISO label) towards public and private companies as the only acceptable video standards.

     

    Top quality freeware programs like Handbrake or MediaCoder and many 'cheaper' commercial products support both MKV and MP4/M4V and many of the best video codecs available. So there's no reason to pretend that there's any other explanation than commercial 'monopoly' interests behind this decision!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 16, 2011 7:47 AM   in reply to EuroSiti

    I bet you think we've never actually been to the moon either.

     

    No, the real reason is almost certainly lack of need on the part of Premiere Pro's user base.  There are no cameras that record files using the MKV format.  It's not widely used in professional circles.  MKV remains a primarily consumer format for teenagers illegally ripping and sharing their movies across P2P networks.  Until enough professional users require the MKV container, I can understand why Adobe hasn't spent resources incorporating support.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 16, 2011 9:39 AM   in reply to EuroSiti

    Welcome to the forum.

     

    I completely agree with Jim, as to the "why" - just not enough folk in the user-base have a need for it. The way to have your need and voice heard, is to file a Feature Request. Adobe engineers do not just sit around the Official Adobe Cafeteria, dreaming up what to add to Premiere. They survey the user-base (partly through the Feature Request forms), and then try to figure out what is worth the development time and money.

     

    It was that way with AVCHD and also VOB editing. Initially, only PrElements could do that, but then the capabilities were added to PrPro, when enough users requested it. As it happened, AVCHD became very popular in some circles, and though editing the MPEG-2's in the VOB containers does not yield high-quality results, it is popular enough.

     

    Let Adobe know what you want, and if the numbers justify, you will likely see internal support in the future.

     

    With the MKV conversion programs, and as Jim points out, no camera producing it, I rather doubt that there are enough users of that format/CODEC to justify, but could be very wrong.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 4:52 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    A quick comparison of these two lists:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_container_formats

    http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/405/kb405978.html

    ... just confirms that the open source standards are only video container formats that are excluded from Adobe products. No WebM. No OGG. No MKV.

     

    The claim that no professional users need this format is a kind of self-fulfilling statement, isn't it?

    Obviously, professional photographers are simply using the formats that are provided by the industry (primarily Adobe, Canon and Apple products). Traditionally, these major companies have developed their own patented container formats and delimited their support for 'competing' formats. More recently, they have started to support each others' container formats, while they've still left out all the unpatented formats and containers.

     

    So supply equals demand here, because professional photographers aren't as focused on export and compression as they are focused on lossless quality editing. But why support a crappy container like Microsoft's AVI, outdated MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 containers, or even the handheld formats if it's just about professional needs in the first part of the media production chain?

     

    DivX supports the Matroska format, which has forced Adobe to improve their outdated H.263-dependent FLV container (aka. F4V), because it was clear that DivX had developed a technically competitive (maybe even superior) HD web video / streaming format. Adobe could simply have chosen to support the MKV container... but they didn't. No, they decided to invent yet another container, of course!

     

    Matroska has existed for almost 9 years. Despite all the newer commercial containers, MKV is still the best option for storing multimedia video/sound/extras in a single file (it even supports DRM if need be!) in a potentially lossless export file format, because MKV supports technically lossless video+sound codecs, which MP4/M4v/F4V don't.

     

    The ongoing lack of support for this format-unlimited, content-unlimted, streaming-friendly, HD-fit container reminds me of the industry's unwillingness to support the MP3 format back in the 1990s, because it was just a format

    ... "for teenagers illegally ripping and sharing their music across P2P networks."

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:11 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    Obviously, professional photographers are simply using the formats that are provided by the industry (primarily Adobe, Canon and Apple products). Traditionally, these major companies have developed their own patented container formats and delimited their support for 'competing' formats.

     

    I am not sure what your intent is, with the above statement, but let's take it at face value, that you are attempting to report in a "fair and balanced" manner.

     

    The ONLY pure Adobe formats are PSD, PDF and DNG. Only PSD really has much place in a video-editing discussion, but no Adobe NLE program limits one to PSD, and will Import other still image formats. PSD's only offer the ability to use the Layers.

     

    Now, with regards to video formats and CODEC's, all that I can think of, belong to someone else. There is MOV (Apple), WMV(MS), AVI (really open here, but not owned, even in part by Adobe), MPEG (really open here, but not owned, even in part by Adobe), AVCHD (a subset of H.264, but not owned, even in part by Adobe), etc.. I could go on, but you see the point. Adobe owns none of those.

     

    Perhaps, a better, and more accurate statement would be, "Adobe has chosen to provide support for some of the most common AV formats, with a variety of CODEC's."

     

    Will you agree with that, or do you have some specific instances, that I just might have missed?

     

    On the part of Open Source, one could argue that PrPro does not support Xvid, but then they only partially support DivX, the commercial version, and that is in Export (though I have the latest Xvid CODEC, I have never been able to Export to it - crashes!).

     

    However, Adobe's NLE's support both Lagarith and UT, two open source lossless CODEC's. What's up with that?

     

    What comes off to me as a "conspiracy theory" is just not holding water, but perhaps I am missing something very important here. Some have postulated that MKV is commonly used by bit-torrent users, but I feel that is wrong. Policing the world is something that Sony and MS are pretty good at, but with the exception of US currency Images in PS, Adobe has steered clear of other efforts, and provide ways to produce both BD's and DVD's - something that Sony has been fighting for over a decade. I just cannot subscribe to many of the points made, but then I am not able to speak for Adobe, so what do I know?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:13 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    Euro Siti: I love you and want to have your children

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:15 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    But why support a crappy container like Microsoft's AVI, outdated MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 containers...

     

    I wanted to address this separately. Let's take a look, shall we?

     

    • DV-AVI is still the basis for SD editing in Adobe NLE's, and is directly supported in Encore.
    • MPEG-1 support is very limited, as it IS an older spec. Some bemoan the lack of complete support, but not many.
    • MPEG-2 is still the CODEC for DVD. Encore authors those. They are still viable. A variation, MPEG-2 HD is one of the only two approved formats/CODEC's for BD. Not sure that I'd write that one off any time soon.

     

    Any more points to contest?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:18 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    No one on earth should be still using AVI or Mpg2!!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:41 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    One last one:

     

    Matroska has existed for almost 9 years. Despite all the newer commercial containers, MKV is still the best option for storing multimedia video/sound/extras in a single file (it even supports DRM if need be!) in a potentially lossless export file format, because MKV supports technically lossless video+sound codecs, which MP4/M4v/F4V don't.

     

    I feel comfortable in stating that after surveying the install-base of PrPro, Adobe has just not hit the number necessary to implement the MKV format/CODEC's. When they do, they will.

     

    Remember, AVCHD was first supported in PrElements, as it was a "consumer format" with the H.264 CODEC. PrPro added it about 18 mos. later. Same for the Import of MPEG-2 in the VOB container. PrE had that 3 years before PrPro added it. It is about the numbers.

     

    This is not an indictment on a format, a container, or a CODEC. It is about the numbers, and profitability.

     

    The ongoing lack of support for this format-unlimited, content-unlimted, streaming-friendly, HD-fit container reminds me of the industry's unwillingness to support the MP3 format back in the 1990s, because it was just a format

    ... "for teenagers illegally ripping and sharing their music across P2P networks."

     

    Not quite so quick here. PrPro does support MP3, though many can cause problems. Still, and in general terms, PrPro (and PrE) supports MP3, and with the right MP3's, many have zero issues. If PrPro supports MP3, what's your point here?

     

    IMHO, you are joisting at "windmills," and using invalid, or partially invalid points to support your biases.

     

    You state that MKV is a great "streaming media" format/COODEC. Fine. Streaming media is a delivery design, and is not meant to be edited. Just like WMV, and others. Why would an NLE, aimed at the pro/pro-sumer market add support for the editing of material, that is not designed to be edited?

     

    Can you name any consumer, pro-sumer or pro cameras, that shoot in MKV?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 24, 2011 5:42 PM   in reply to qmunikate

    Which camera are you using, that shoots in MKV?

     

    Maybe that has something to do with PrPro not offering direct support for it?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 25, 2011 3:30 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    There are no video cameras that record in VOB or M2TS either. They are export (end user) container formats - just like Matroska - only more inconvenient for storage/backup purposes and more space-inefficient than the format- and content-unrestricted MKV container.

     

    MKV is supported by all sorts of regular hardware media players these days (NAS drive / media centers, most Samsung and also Philips players, and basically most of the "minor" electronics manufacturers have products that support MKV. Among the "big ones", only Canon, Sony and Apple have a 100% Matroska-less product line, as far as I'm aware.

     

    http://help.adobe.com/en_US/mediaencoder/cs/using/WS725e431141e7ba651e 63e3d1267818bc51-8000.html

     

    I did not mean photographers (sorry) but professional video makers/editors. These people have no more need for, VOB, SWF, 3GP, MPEG-1, M2TS, MP4 or WMV than they have for MKV, OGG or WebM. They're simply using thet file containers for export that are available in programs such as PrPro and Final Cut.

     

    If quality preservation really mattered to Adobe, they would of course have begun supporting the lossless video and audio codecs (and the containers that support them, namely Matroska and basically no thers) years ago.

     

    Perhaps it is worth adding that Adobe doesn't support the lossless, but critically acclaimed and professionally adopted FLAC audio+container format either?

    - I wonder why? The obvious answer is that they value a good relationship with Apple, Sony and Microsoft (whom are currently at war with Google and the entire open source community) above anything else.

     

    The "ban" on MKV these days just reminded me of the "ban" on MP3 by all the major hardware manufacturers back in the 1990s... And your reference to "MKV as a teenage pirat format" sounded like an echo of what Sony said about MP3 back then.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 25, 2011 7:37 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Roughly said: Since Matroska and FLAC were invented, there hasn't been any need for any other video or sound containers for end user storage purposes - only a need for improved compression algorithms.

     

    But for the past two decades, Apple, Sony, Canon, Micrsoft and also Adobe/Corel have continually been adding primitive (technically unnecessary) format restrictions to their popular software products. ("If you wanna use OUR software, you also gotta use OUR format standards... and no one else's!")

     

    There was never any need for an FLV container (Ogg+Theora was just as good), and there certainly isn't any need for the F4V container either with both MP4 and MKV already on the market.

     

    Inventing new file formats just to make extra license profits is an incredibly old-fashioned and unhealthy way of making money these days. Maybe it worked 5 or 10 years ago, but today it just seems stupid... just as it was stupid to fight against the MP3 format 15 years ago.

     

    When high quality video editing and rendering becomes available through powerful, cloud-based solutions, oldfashioned standalone programs like Final Cut, Premiere Pro etc. will of course become obsolete - and so will the file formats that were invented along with them. The world has no need for any more license-crippled, content-restricted file formats.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 25, 2011 8:22 AM   in reply to EuroSiti

    There are no video cameras that record in VOB or M2TS either.

     

    You are missing all of the miniDVD cameras here. Yes, they are consumer units, but that is why PrElements added VOB support, well before PrPro did.

     

    MKV is supported by all sorts of regular hardware media players these days (NAS drive / media centers, most Samsung and also Philips players, and basically most of the "minor" electronics manufacturers have products that support MKV. Among the "big ones", only Canon, Sony and Apple have a 100% Matroska-less product line, as far as I'm aware.

     

    This is for delivery, no?

     

    I did not mean photographers (sorry) but professional video makers/editors. These people have no more need for, VOB, SWF, 3GP, MPEG-1, M2TS, MP4 or WMV than they have for MKV, OGG or WebM. They're simply using thet file containers for export that are available in programs such as PrPro and Final Cut.

     

    I agree, but it seems that Adobe has detected such a need, and in great enough numbers to justify adding support for some of those formats. When the numbers are high enough for the support of MKV, I feel that Adobe will add it.

     

    If quality preservation really mattered to Adobe, they would of course have begun supporting the lossless video and audio codecs (and the containers that support them, namely Matroska and basically no thers) years ago.

     

    For me, Lagarith and UT work perfectly fine in my Adobe NLE's, including PrElements. Not sure what you point is here.

     

    The "ban" on MKV these days just reminded me of the "ban" on MP3 by all the major hardware manufacturers back in the 1990s... And your reference to "MKV as a teenage pirat format" sounded like an echo of what Sony said about MP3 back then.

     

    You choose to use the word "ban," but I would say "lack of support," and that still goes back to numbers. If one wishes to campaign for support of a particular format/container/CODEC, Adobe makes it easy - the Feature Request form. When enough users file those, I am sure that Adobe will add support. However, the numbers must reach some "critical mass."

     

    You appear to see a vast conspiricy, run by a "star-chamber" populated by Adobe, Microsoft, Sony, Apple and a few other power players. I see a market-driven company, attempting to return a profit for its shareholders, faced with choices on resource allocation, directed at creating a program that functions best for the largest segment of its user-base. I imagine that to add support would take development, and the resources for that development are limited and expensive. Adobe is just looking for ROI, with that development. R & D, and then implementation, cost money. If that money gives greater ROI elsewhere, I would think that Adobe would apply it there. As I have stated above, I feel that if the numbers justify it, then Adobe will implement it, unless there are some deep coding issues, where to add MKV, would break something else. I doubt this, but do not know.

     

    I have no problem, whatsoever, with MKV, but have to admit that in my years, have not had the need for it. No client has either requested it, or provided it. Should they, then I would look for 3rd party solutions first, and not waste my time bemoaning Adobe's lack of support.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 25, 2011 8:27 AM   in reply to EuroSiti

    Then, by your model, Adobe, Microsoft, Apple and Sony will all fail, because the full market has gone elsewhere. Is that correct?

     

    Maybe we should also campaign for all camera mfgrs. to stop development of proprietary CODEC's, since MKV exists and is so far superior to all developments, that have come since.

     

    Perhaps a boycott of Canon, Panasonic, RED, Sony, JVC, Nikon and all others, would be in order. We could carry banners stating, "Give me MKV, or give me death," and rally around each companies' headquarters?

     

    BTW - have you filed your Feature Request with Adobe?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jun 6, 2011 1:22 PM   in reply to (David_Kozar)

    I suppose no one tried changing the file extension from .MKV to .AVI, right?

     

    It worked for me.

     

    It took awhile for the video to conform (after importing the video to PP, check the status bar on the bottom right corner to view the status of PP conforming the file).

     
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    Jun 6, 2011 3:10 PM   in reply to HS1979

    Good to know, and thanks for reporting.

     

    Unfortunately, the thread deviated very soon from the original question, which should have been Importing/editing MKV footage. There is another similar MKV thread around, and it too deviated into an "Adobe should, or should not, support every format." Or, they became an argument on how good/bad MKV was.

     

    Your comments and suggestion are appreciated,

     

    Hunt

     
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