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Adobe Media Encoder 4.2 update forces Frame Blend

Feb 16, 2010 6:57 AM

I didn't really want to repost, but I felt the title and info in my previous post were innacurate (http://forums.adobe.com/message/2576915#2576915)

In my previous post, I thought Premiere was to blame, but after a few reinstallations, I've found that the update to AME 4.2 causes the problem.

 

I've found that Adobe Media Encoder 4.2 forces Frame Blend, even if it has been disabled on each clip of the timeline, when the frame rate of your sequence settings differ from the frame rate of the target format.

 

Example: Exporting from 24fps Desktop -> MPEG2-DVD (23.976fps)

 

Adobe Media Encoder 4.1 does not have this behavior.  I've reverted to 4.1 for the time being.

 

If anyone has a workaround for this, or any other info on this problem, please share.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 16, 2010 7:05 AM   in reply to noframeblending

    Frame blending is only relevant when using slow motion. If the clips all run at standard speed, it is not used and thus not relevant.

     
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    Feb 16, 2010 7:16 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Harm Millaard wrote:

     

    Frame blending is only relevant when using slow motion. If the clips all run at standard speed, it is not used and thus not relevant.

    Not entirely correct. As of 4.2, Premiere and AME now introduce frame blending when exporting to a frame rate that does not exactly match your sequence frame rate. For example, I previously would export any 29.97fps sequence to a round-figure frame rate of 30fps for web use (FLV, H.264, WMV, whatever). Before 4.2, AME would do a 1-to-1 transfer of source frames to the destination frames, so the end result was discreet frames with an ever-so-slight duration change. Now, AME tries to keep the duration the same when doing such an export, which results in an awful blurring resulting from blended frames. It's even worse if you try to do something like a 15fps export (which is nice for the longer preview exports I have to do)--there is no 14.985fps option in AME, so the result is dream-like mush.

     

    Try it for yourself...

     
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    Feb 16, 2010 8:37 AM   in reply to noframeblending

    I admit I said slow motion, where the more accurate statement would have been: "If there is ANY change in speed". All these problems only occur when there is a change in speed between original and export.

     
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    Feb 16, 2010 8:33 AM   in reply to noframeblending

    noframeblending wrote:

     

    A tangent, but something to think about: How many people have complained about fuzzy/unsharp/poor encodes that are actually a result of  frame blend being applied?

     

    Interesting...any thoughts Dennis?

     
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    Feb 16, 2010 11:38 AM   in reply to noframeblending

    PAL does not have those problems. NTSC got it's name for a reason. Time to abandon NTSC altogether, which would have been great 30+ years ago, but some people thought it better to keep that strange format alive. Lucky I'm living in PAL land.

     
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    Feb 18, 2010 10:52 AM   in reply to noframeblending

    This "update" is also driving me nuts.  I can't believe Adobe would add something like this in a patch!!  And with no mention of it anywhere!!  (If it was announced in a changelog/version history/readme, etc, please point me to it.)  We routinely export stuff for the web at 15fps (originally shot at 29.97 or 30 fps) and this new "feature" is killing us.  Now we have to export at the native frame rate and run that through VirtualDub -- which can properly reduce the frame rate without turning our video into a bad acid trip -- then encode that second intermediate file!  It blows my mind that a free program written by one guy produces better quality results (in other tasks too, like resizing, deinterlacing, etc) than a very expensive program written by, I would assume, a fairly large team of professional developers.  And VirtualDub (and other programs) have had better methods for many, many years!  Why hasn't Adobe "adopted" some of these better methods over the years??  I've been using Premiere since 6.0 (that's pre-Premiere Pro 1.0 for the newer users) and every time a new version came out I would think, surely they're going to export/resize/deinterlace/encode/etc/etc/etc better in this version.  But I've finally given up on that hope.  It just don't understand why they don't/can't get this stuff right.

     

    Sorry for the rant.  It's been a long time in the making.

     
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    Feb 18, 2010 12:42 PM   in reply to noframeblending

    Dennis??

     
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    Feb 18, 2010 3:34 PM   in reply to noframeblending

    I am having a similar problem.  Is it just me or is it Adobe?  I have had so many problems with Adobe Premiere CS4.  It may have also been exacerbated by the fact the I updated to 4.2.1 (mostly in part to determine if another issue was resolved with this update).

     

    I have some editing background in the Windows Movie Maker and iMovie world, and was excited to use Adobe Premiere, but I have had nothing but problems.

     

    Everything that I am trying to do, looks really washed out, and renders the video useless.

     

    I am trying to do what you just described, with speeding up and slowing video to match the computer actions with the person's voice.  I am capturing video using CamStudio and Helix YV12 CODEC, and tried to use HuffyUV lossless compression: using DV-NTSC as the standard format.

     

    Then I go to compose my video, and output the video, but the video is crap.  It sounds like the Adobe Premiere and Media Encoder are having major problems.

     

    I tried rendering it to Uncompressed Microsoft AVI with UYVY @ 100% quality, and tried to compare it with Windows Media at the highest quality, and it is frustrating.  When I hear that Frame Blend is being applied, it seems to look worse.

     

    I am running:

    Intel Core 2 Quad CPU 2.33 GHz (which is kind of slow)

    8 GB RAM, 2 SATA 1 TB Drives WD Caviar Green (a little substandard)

    Windows XP 64-bit

     

    Let me know there is another process that I am missing.  I don't really want to give up on Adobe Premiere, but from a end-user standpoint, I will have to revert back to using WMM due to time constraints.  I want to take full advantage of all of the editing and effects capabilities of Premiere, but can't because I can't even produce a decent export to be used by any other program (and given that every conversion will in some way affect the quality of the output, I want to reduce any intermediate steps).

     

    Arrggh!!!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 16, 2010 6:48 PM   in reply to noframeblending

    Six year old girls notified us we had the "squashed bug" problem.

    AME does frame blend going from Canon 24P AVCHD to Apple TV 720 24P preset.

    Why?

     
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