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The image exceeds the size Save for Web & Devices was designed for

Jun 10, 2010 9:44 AM

I just upgraded from CS3 to CS5. I assumed that Save for Web & Devices would have been redesigned so that it would not complain with modern large photos that they were just too big!

 

However, it still does. I just don't get this. Photoshop in general now is editing very large images. It should be able to handle them also in this feature.

 

Is this just a legacy message, or is it really true that this feature can only handle small images?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 9:54 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    No one, absolutely nobody needs large images on the web.  That's why Save for Web was designed for web-sized images.

     

    Photoshop is working as designed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 1:55 PM   in reply to snorkeler

    Save for web was originally designed to optimize web graphics by squeezing out bytes while retaining quality.  It was not meant to scale and then optimize large images. This is demonstrated in the alert message.

     

    You could submit a feature request to Adobe to alter the original intent of SFW.

     

    SFW may display 4 versions of an image in various types of optimization. This requires saving 4 temporary files. Imagine trying to save a huge image 4 times at once through 'File-Save As'. This is why you see that alert message. It takes time to generate those temp files, especially when you throw a huge file at it.

     

    Consider a scripted solution to this where a copy of your image is first reduced, then transferred to SFW.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 2:29 PM   in reply to snorkeler

    snorkeler wrote:

     

    Tai Lao misunderstands my question…

     

    No, snorkeler, I do understand your question.  It is you who are misconstruing my remark.

     

     

    snorkeler wrote:

     

    …I am referring to the size of the image you begin before you produce a smaller web version…

     

    So am I. 

     

     

     

    Wo Tai Lao Le

    我太老了

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 2:41 PM   in reply to Tai Lao

    You are mistaken, Mr. Tai. The warning is inappropriate and should be either removed from the program or allow a “Don’t show this warning again,” option. Of course when saving an image for web I will want a smaller image, that’s why there are options to scale the image. I often start with a larger image when using Save for Web, with the full intention of scaling it down. Warning me is pointless.


    It’s as though the door to my house knows I only own a bicycle so it warns me whenever I leave the house with a large package that won’t fit on my bicycle, ignorant of the fact that I have borrowed my mom’s car.


    There are many improvements that Save for Web has needed since it was introduced. This warning is one. Another is that it often takes a long time to generate the preview before the user can enter any data, like the actual image size needed. The program takes several seconds to generate a useless preview of a too large image, rather than letting the use set the size first. It is also unforgivable that the presets, in both Illustrator and Photoshop, do not remember scaling.

     
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    Jun 10, 2010 3:10 PM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    You are entitled to your opinion, Mr. Falkner, but I respectfully disagree with it.

     

    You can always post a feature request for Adobe to consider.  I do not need such a "feature" and I appreciate the alert message.

     
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    Jun 10, 2010 3:12 PM   in reply to Tai Lao

    Tai Lao wrote:

     

    You can always post a feature request for Adobe to consider.

     

    I have, several times. I usually call the official feature request page the Memory Hole.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 4:21 PM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    Scott Falkner wrote:

     

    I usually call the official feature request page the Memory Hole.

     

    I sympathize with that.  It does indeed have the feeling of a black hole in outer space.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 4:45 PM   in reply to snorkeler

    Save For Web is not intended to resize images, just to take the appropriately sized image and optimize if for the web (reduce number of colors, reduce quality, strip metadata, etc.).

     

    The warning is there for a reason, and it is a valid and true warning.

     
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    Jun 10, 2010 5:01 PM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    We do read the user reported bugs and feature requests.

    But we get too many to respond to individually.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 7:46 PM   in reply to snorkeler

    snorkeler wrote:

     


     

    Is there really no way to go straight from a full size picture to a certain size/type/quality level in one step? Say taking a 2400x1600 pixel PSD image, and creating a 480x320 .jpg quality level 10 version? And then doing this as a batch operation on a folder of images?

    Of couse there is...

    Look up Batch Process and Photoshop Actions in the Help file.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 8:24 PM   in reply to snorkeler

    No, there is, by default, no direct way to resize and save.

    You can resize, then save.

    You can write an action to resize, save, undo the resize, etc.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2010 10:09 PM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    Save For Web is not intended to resize images…

    What an absurd statement. Of course it is intended to resize images. That’s why there is an Image Size tab in the interface. Of course people will use it to save images at multiple resolutions, such as logos, program icons, and web page widgets. Of course someone exporting an image that’s 3,000 pixels wide will want to resize it. The warning serves only to get in the user’s way and slow things down. If Adobe wants to add features to get in the user’s way and slow things down then they should be… well, I guess they’re doing fine by that already.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 1:39 AM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    It turns out that the Creative Suite's Help files support Mr. Falkner's position:

     

    Save4web.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 5:21 AM   in reply to Tai Lao

    I'm afraid to look at the help files in reference to the crop tool.

     
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    Jun 11, 2010 6:24 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    Although I'm sure many of you are aware of it, I'd like to direct everyone's attention to Paul Riggott's Batch Save For Web script.

     

    It gets around this and other problems by letting you flatten and resize/fit first, then run an action (e.g. sharpening), then export through SFW.

     

    Like the others here, I can't fathom why an ordinary out-of-the-camera-sized file should be too big for SFW. In fact, resizing large files should be a key function in SFW.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 6:30 AM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    Scott Falkner wrote:

     

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    Save For Web is not intended to resize images…

    What an absurd statement...

    I suspect Chris meant to write:

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    Save For Web is not intended to resize [huge] images…

    I would not argue with an Adobe developer when they state what they intended with a function. We customers cannot read their minds and know their motivations.

     

    As a web designer, it is pretty easy to assume Adobe's intent with SFW.

     

    While there is certainly an ability to resize an image in the SFW dialog, resizing huge images was not likely Adobe's core intent of this SFW function. SFW is primarily intended for previewing temporarily saved variations of an image to obtain the smallest file size. We're talking about shaving bytes off of an image - - not megabytes. Web and UI artists work at 100% view. Every pixel counts and cannot be resampled. Even though there is an ability to do so, they are not likely resizing a design arbitrarily within the SFW dialog.

     
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    Jun 11, 2010 7:03 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    snorkeler wrote:

     

    ...I was trying to avoid the image degradation that creeps in with multiple resizing.

    That should not really be a concern for most situations. If it is, there are plenty of demonstrations of good workflows out on the net. Here is one. You can create an action to automate these steps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 8:21 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    It is quite easy to discern what Adobe intended... if you are a web/UI designer. I can understand everyone's confusion if they are not web designers. Web/UI designers always work at 100% so scaling is not a big concern in SFW.

     

    I've noticed that SFW has been heavily used by many as a crutch for failing to understand image preparation. We see it often here in the forum.

    Someone's image won't save well to JPG that can be emailed to a client? It is probably in 16bit or CMYK. Instead of advising them to sort out their workflow and understand that CMYK and 16 bit imagery is not supported in JPG, we simply say "use SFW". While software is certainly there to make our lives easier, it cannot replace our own common sense. There's no warning on our flatbed scanner that yells at us for scanning a 5x7 photo at 2400 ppi when all we need is a printed reproduction at 4x6 at 300 ppi.

     

    As noted in the link I posted, sharpening is an often needed step after resampling. As SFW does not offer sharpening, it makes sense to prepare an image for the web at 100% before going to SFW.

     

    Of course, there is a place to make feature requests here by following the 'Contact' links at the top and bottom of every adobe.com web page.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 8:53 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    snorkeler wrote:

     

    I prefer documentation over trying to guess how something works, or its 'intent'.

    I thought that documentation was provided to you from several sources.

     

    1. A Photoshop developer explicitly stated in this thread that SFW was not intended for image scaling.
    2. Photoshop's help files show a PSD image at 100% being converted to a web image format.
    3. The professional photographer that I linked to shows how they scale an image before going to SFW.

     

    Sharpening an image for the web helps to clarify the information that is lost when you scale it down and lose detail. We might also sharpen images to compensate for the smoothing that may occur during compression in SFW.

     

    If you want a single step solution, consider a droplet so you can process a whole mess of images at once. SFW only lets you process one image at a time.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 11, 2010 9:12 AM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    Scott Falkner wrote:

     

    The program takes several seconds to generate a useless preview of a too large image, rather than letting the use set the size first.

    There's the rub. Should we go the route you suggest, we'd lose that warning prompt that the image is too large but we'd be held up with another prompt to enter image dimensions (or click to render the preview) on every image when SFW loads.  That would be more intrusive than the current warning. We're probably dealing with the best option as it is currently designed... unless you can suggest a better idea that requires less clicks.

     
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    Jun 11, 2010 9:28 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    There is nothing, except lack of will and perhaps lack of skill, to prevent Adobe from making Photoshop render while letting the user input data. Why not let me change the image size or file format while the image is calculated in the background? If Adobe cared about providing an intuitive and responsive user experience, they would have done this already. So we know how important that is.

     
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    Jun 11, 2010 11:06 AM   in reply to Scott Falkner

    That certainly sounds like a feasible plan for Adobe engineers to work on and possibly release in CS6 or CS7.

     

    I'd be more interested in something I can do today on my own terms. I can spend 10 seconds to create an action that scales the image and then passes it on to SFW. A single F-key assigned to this action seems more appealing to my own user experience than smashing the multiple keys required just to fire up SFW.

     

    Here's are the steps I use for an action I call 'Prep 4 SFW' tied to my F12 key:

    1) Image Size - scale to width of 1024 pixels (or whatever common size you need for your web template) with constrained proportions, bicubic interpolation

    2) Select Save For Web menu item

    3) Select previous history state (restores the canvas to the original size after saving as JPG/GIF/PNG in SFW)

     

    This very basic action seems to be much more efficient than any previous programming suggestion in this thread, except of course, when Chris mentioned it in his own post.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 8, 2010 9:40 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Hi Marion. I have been frustrated over this same shortcoing of SFW. I am an amateur PS user with CS4. I have read through all the letters and replies concerning this issue and one of the original questions still has not been answered. You seem knowledgable and logical in your contributions to the discussion so perhaps you  could answer it. How big is too big to process a file in Save for the Web and Devices.i would really appreciate your opinion. thanks

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 9, 2010 12:42 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    "It is probably in 16bit or CMYK"

     

    While it's true that jpegs don't support 16 bit per channel or alpha channels, there is absolutely no problem saving CMYK files as jpegs when needed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 9, 2010 5:13 PM   in reply to geranium16

    You can experiment to see how big is too big.

     

    SFW is designed primarily to experiment with image compression, not image size.The images that I send to it are already sized.

     

    You can set a temporary size to your image before it is passed off to SFW through an action associated with a hot key. At the end of the SFW function, you can have your action restore the image to its original size.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 14, 2010 5:31 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Hi  again Marion.Many thanks for your advice and info. I am new to this forum process so I hope its Ok to change the topic slightly. Please could you give advice re the following. Most books advise you to resharpen after Saving for Web and Devices. the trouble is if you use the unsharp mask you end up with the image being changed back into  PSD format. then you have to do a Save As to change back  into JPEG format. Is there any way around this?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 14, 2010 7:17 AM   in reply to geranium16

    geranium16 wrote:

     

    ...Most books advise you to resharpen after Saving for Web and Devices....

    Which books? You are correct in assuming that it makes no sense.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 1:10 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    > Save for web was originally designed to optimize web graphics by  squeezing out bytes while retaining quality.  It was not meant to scale  and then optimize large images. This is demonstrated in the alert  message.

     

    and I should care why ? Software does not exist to massage the egos of the programmers, and I (as a programmer for 25 years) do not care a fig for whatever they "intended". It says "save for web" and that's exactly what I want to do - and it offers to shrink the image so one can hardly argue credibly that it wasn't designed to do that. It shouldn't fall to the users to divine the aspirations of the programmers, but contrariwise for the programmers to cater to their users. And don't get me started on the fact that the tool forgets whatever you set it last time despite the obvious fact that you might to squash consecutive images the same way. Much of Photoshop's design is still rooted in the 90s Nnedless to say I have enough RAM and CPU that the tool never does fail despite the fatuous warning!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2011 10:12 AM   in reply to snorkeler

    any update on this?

    I don't care about the intent of the warning, or the best time to resize, sharpen.

    I just don't want to have to see the warning again, ever.

    Any way to get rid of it?

     

    Thanks, Sheldon.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2011 12:24 PM   in reply to Sheldon McLean

    As this thread started with a user's experience with a newly released CS5, you would need to install any CS5 update that has been issued since then.

     

    Supposing that you do not see any change after applying all relevant updates, you should probably try the easy workarounds suggested previously.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2011 3:17 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    thanks for your response Marian.

    I am running the the most up-to-date CS5, but this warning has been there for years (in older CS versions).

     

    I skimmed the thread, but I don't see any easy workarounds. Can you point me in the right direction?

     

    --Sheldon.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 18, 2011 3:46 AM   in reply to Sheldon McLean

    Post #27 has steps you can record in an action.

     
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    Mar 18, 2011 6:55 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    I see you are trying to help, so thank you.

    I'm not re-sizing my images, I'm saving out large (by large, I mean full-res) jpegs that get used on client-review website so my clients can view before and after work (retouching) at full res. My website at www.shiftstudio.ca gives the idea, except on the review site the image are even bigger (full-res)

    I use SFW because it has more of the features I need than a regular save as does. I just don't want to see the warning any longer. I have to click past it 5-50 times per day.

     

    make sense?

     

    --Sheldon.

     

    www.shiftstudio.ca

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 18, 2011 7:48 AM   in reply to Sheldon McLean

    If you are using SFW to convert CMYK->RGB or embed/convert/remove color profile data, you might craft an action so that you can use the regular 'Save As'.

     

    If you are using SFW to strip meta data, there are a few googleable utilities that can process a folder full of files in a couple seconds.

     

    Keep in mind that you are not being held up by just this 'image exceeds...' prompt in SFW. SFW is also taking time to render the previews of the optimized versions of your image. You will likely find more speed with a custom action that does a plain save.

     
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