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ICC profile editor

Nov 24, 2008 11:16 AM

Hi. Anyone knows an ICC (ICM) profile editor (by Adobe or - in lack thereof - any other, preferably freeware) to fine-tune an ICC profile created by a calibration device ? Thanks.
 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 24, 2008 12:28 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Generally spoken, profiles shouldn't need editing.

    My practical advice is this: if the profile isn't
    convincing, then change the parameters for the gene-
    ration of the profile, based on accurately measured
    target values. There are so many degrees of freedom,
    concerning total ink limit, GCR strategy, starting
    point of GCR etc..
    So far my comment refers to printer profiles.

    More feedback can be expected here (Adobe Color
    Management):
    http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?14@@.eea5b31

    Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 24, 2008 1:07 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Mark,

    I'm using ProfileMaker5, and here it's really not
    necessary to 'tweak' the monitor profiles.
    I don't know whether PhS offers editing of (monitor)
    profiles.
    It should be discussed why your calibration device
    doesn't deliver reliable profiles.

    I'm not believing in the eternal truth of industrial
    software, but concerning the monitor calibration,
    the state of the art is IMO convincing.

    Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 24, 2008 9:34 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Monitor profiles really should never need or be edited. They are what they are, and they're supposed to represent the current state of your calibration. Datacolor should give you another puck if you're not getting dead neutral grays. When you bring up a neutral RGB "gray" ramp in any standardized RGB space, it should appear neutral or very near neutral throughout the tonal range.

    I use ProfileMaker 5 too, and the Edit Module in it is one of the best available. There are plenty of times where you need to do a very specific Selective Color tweak to some output profiles. There are also times where I've edited a slightly steeper, and more contrasty, black curve in CMYK profiles for offset presses, but only after seeing that every file needed the same post conversion fix to make them pop.

    Profile Editing in general is not something to be taken lightly, and often, "fixing" one thing unfixes something else. If you have the interest and the patience and the real need, editing can put that final touch that takes your output to the next level - just not on the monitor.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 1:12 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    No, I cant think of any way at all you can edit your monitor profile in Photoshop. Your reference was to a not-very-scientific way of compensating for an imperfect scanner profile (basically, rebuilding it having used Curves to change the scanned values it is built on).

    Im wondering what it is youre seeing that makes you feel your monitor profile needs adjusting? (Dont forget, any sensor or profiler is limited by what the monitor is physically capable of).

    BasICColor Display4 is an excellent monitor/display profiler and does have a fine-tuning edit facility (though Ive never tried it out) You can trial it
    here

    Good luck
    Glenn
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 1:54 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    I too think BasICColor Display4 can do very good monitor profiles and it's quite unexpensive for what it does (especially compared with ProfileMaker).
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 2:03 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Mark - what are the white point/gamma/luminance settings? Have you tried using the monitor controls to get it roughly right and recalibrate?

    While the Spyder3pro isn't the most expensive, it should be perfectly adequate for this purpose. I don't use it myself (I use a Spyder2 puck with ColorEyes Display Pro) - but I notice it has an ambient light sensor, could this be what's throwing it off?

    Oh, one more thing, is your monitor properly warmed up (at least 30 mins) before calibration?
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 4:13 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    >It has several predefined working modes: Text, Picture, Movie, Custom, sRGB.

    I'd go for custom and get it in the ballpark on the monitor first. Then calibrate to D65 (6500), gamma 2,2 and luminance 100 - 120 cd/m².

    Edit: that is, if "custom" is what I think it is. Check that it sets all controls more or less to neutral, then go from there.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 8:53 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Mark,

    Please, please, do not edit your monitor profile. It will only serve to confuse your issues and you'll never know exactly where you are, color or calibration wise. In the last 12 years of making hardware calibrated monitor profiles, I have never once encountered a circumstance where the monitor profile needed editing and I can't believe yours does either. What you are trying to do is compensate for bad hardware, and that's not what profile editing is for.

    Order yourself up a Gretag/X-Rite calibrator and be done with it.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 10:33 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    >why would "custom" be more adequate than sRGB ?

    It was just that since the sRGB setting seemed to lock down all parameters you had nothing to lose. As the others say, a profile that doesn't give you dead neutral grays is basically useless.

    Just go with what Peter says. He's been doing this for a long time.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2008 1:57 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Adobe Gamma...that could well be your problem right there. See, the calibrator's LUT loader and Adobe Gamma are mutually exclusive, if they're both active at startup. If Adobe Gamma kicks in after the LUT loader, that's the profile that will load.

    Open the "Run" box in your start menu and type "msconfig" (ex the quotes). Click the Startup tab. If Adobe Gamma is checked, uncheck it and restart.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2008 1:34 AM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Mark,

    I have a Flexscan as well and with a colorimetre and a BasicICColor or a ColorEye or even the software that comes with the colorimetre, the profiles are very good (I have tried the three, by the way and I bought the first one thought ColorEyes is almost as good as well and much easier to install).

    I would not mess around with the monitor's profile, truly. Ask in the color management forum. Over there, Lou Dina has a PDF on basic calibration for his clients that explains this matters and their 'whys' and 'hows' very well, for instance.

    You'll reach a rather satisfying point with no doubt, just don't get lost in this editing-profile track, if I may say it so.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 28, 2008 12:59 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    "Color.org says that Photoshop can both create AND edit profiles !! : "

    What they fail to mention is the extremely limited fashion that Ps can do this. The only profiles that Ps can create or modify on its own are the "icc" compliant profiles generated from the Custom CMYK control panel. When you generate and save these settings as profiles, Ps does see them as such, but they're not the same in the sense that they're based off of custom measurements.

    The only way I know of to modify or edit true icc profiles in Photoshop is with Kodak's Custom Color Edit module, which operates as a Photoshop plugin and uses Photoshop's color and tone controls to do the editing. ColorVision's edit module may also work in a similar fashion.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 28, 2008 1:41 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    There is an app, now discontinued I think, called Doctor Pro. If memory serves, it is—or was—a Photoshop plugin. It allowed you to adjust your image with Photoshop's controls, saving the steps as an Action. Once you had the result you wanted, you could tell DP to read the action and edit the targeted color profile. How well it accomplished the job is anyone's guess.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 28, 2008 2:12 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    "Can you edit all sorts of profiles with Kodak's plugin or only CMYK profiles? "

    I have a copy of it, but I haven't used it in some time. I believe it will edit both input and output profiles, RGB and CMYK. Not as robust as Profilemaker, but not bad for $500. I'm pretty sure that DoctorPro was the ColorVision product I remembered. I don't have any experience with that, just the two others I've mentioned.
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 28, 2008 4:09 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)
    Mark, that looks like it might work in a similar fashion. Quickly skimming through the text reminded me that there were certain profiles that couldn't be edited properly if at all, and that seems to be the case with this product as well. Might be worth a try, although you won't know how effective it is until you've bought it (trial version doesn't save your edits).
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2010 12:39 PM   in reply to (Mark_J_Peterson)

    "You can create a custom ICC profile using Adobe Photoshop. In Photoshop, choose Edit > Color Settings. The RGB and CMYK menus in the Working Spaces area of the Photoshop Color Settings dialog box include options for saving and loading ICC profiles and defining custom profiles."

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2010 12:51 PM   in reply to Gernot Hoffmann

    >> Generally spoken, profiles shouldn't need editing.

     

    That wasn't the question.

     

    Wright Brothers: "How do we make a man fly?"

    Gernot:              "Men shouldn't fly."

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,471 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2010 9:30 PM   in reply to Danvidian
    function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

    Danvidian wrote:


    "You can create a custom ICC profile using Adobe Photoshop. In Photoshop, choose Edit > Color Settings. The RGB and CMYK menus in the Working Spaces area of the Photoshop Color Settings dialog box include options for saving and loading ICC profiles and defining custom profiles."

     

    Custom RGB...

     

    Thank you for that.  Yet another function hidden deep within Photoshop that I've just never noticed before.

     

    -Noel

     
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