Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Lumix G1 Lens Profile

Sep 8, 2010 1:30 AM

does anyone have a lens profile for lumix G1 with 14-45 and 45-200 lens, created from adobe lens profile creator?

 

Thanks

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2010 1:40 AM   in reply to anfrw

    anfrw wrote:

     

    does anyone have a lens profile for lumix G1 with 14-45 and 45-200 lens, created from adobe lens profile creator?

    Thanks

    Why would you need one? Because there are no profiles in the list shipped with the product? Just in case you don't know already, since version 2.x LR can read and interpret the lens correction data written by the Panasonic camera body into the raw file. Thus, you don't need lens profiles for Lumix G lenses, unless you aren't happy with them for some reason. Therefore, there are no Lumix G lenses listed and the new lens correction feature does not provide any additional benefit in LR3 for Lumix G users, except manual perspective correction.

     

    Kind regards

     

    Thomas

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2010 9:01 AM   in reply to anfrw

    Panasonic did their lens corrections themselves. It's written in the RAW files and is correctly interpreted by Lightroom.

    You will notice on Panasonic support site that there are firmware updates not only for camera bodies but also for the different lenses.

    You can correct them manually for perspective reason, but barrel vignet and Chromatic Aberration are done inside the camera.

     

    Frans

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2010 9:49 AM   in reply to c.frans w

    No, lens corrections are not done inside the camera when shooting raw, they are only applied to in-camera JPEGs. Panasonic only writes the parameters needed to correct the images into the raw file, but it does not alter the raw image data. Additionally, lens corrections are applied to the small camera-generated previews, embedded in the RAW files. Adobe reads the correction parameters from the raw file and applies the required correction to the previews and eventually to any exported RGB file. This features is available already since version 2.6(?), before LR3 showed up with lens profiles.

     

    As I said, Panasonic Lumix G users don't need to do anything. There images get corrected automatically, and this has nothing to do with the lens profile panel. Therefore, Lumix G lenses are not listed there. The lens profile panel is not applicable to those lenses and nobody needs to worry about doing his own lens calibration. If you use legacy lenses, then you need to establish your own lens profiles.

     

     

     

    Kind regards

     

    Thomas

    c.frans w wrote:

     

    Panasonic did their lens corrections themselves. It's written in the RAW files and is correctly interpreted by Lightroom.

    You will notice on Panasonic support site that there are firmware updates not only for camera bodies but also for the different lenses.

    You can correct them manually for perspective reason, but barrel vignet and Chromatic Aberration are done inside the camera.

     

    Frans

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 7, 2010 4:33 AM   in reply to tgutgu

    Hi tgutgu

     

    I wondered too why there are no lens profiles available for Lumix G lenses.

     

    But what i do not understand is, why are there lens profiles for Nikon, Canon etc.? Why do they not embedd the correction parameters to their lenses like Panasonic does it? (and so you have to use and activate the preinstalled profiles?)

    And why Lumix G users can not deactivate the lens correction to compare the resulting difference?

     

    Kind regards,

    Roman.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 7, 2010 5:23 AM   in reply to romankue

    As far as can see from info provided on the net this is as designed by Panasonic. To control the size and design features of the new mini four thirds lenses there needs to be further processing by firmware in camera or in the raw processing software to achieve the desired / design results.

     

    Processing the raw files with third party raw converters without the adjustments necessary for the specific lens will not deliver acceptable results. I am not aware of the specifics but this is my understanding from what I have on the web. Adobe were provided with the adjustments necessary.

     

    This is not the case with other DSLR manufactures systems other than mFour Thirds.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 7, 2010 5:36 AM   in reply to romankue

    Oh, Canon, Nikon do embed a lot of this information in their raw files.  They just don't fully share the details of this information with others, at least not to the level and detail that Adobe requires.

     

    The camera and lens profiling tools are a way to level the playing field, and allow Adobe to offer a standard kit across many manufacturers.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 8, 2010 9:07 AM   in reply to clvrmnky

    ACR and LR automatically support lens corrections for Panasonic (and more generally all Micro Four-Thirds cameras), since versions 5.2 and 2.2, respectively.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 8, 2010 4:26 PM   in reply to anfrw

    If you want to see what m 4:3 images look like without lens correction you will need to use a RAW processor that doesn't read the data that all m 4:3's cameras embeds for the lenses designed for them. It is quite interesting. I took a look at the f 1.7 40mm lens in LightZone, which unlike LR doesn't read and apply the embedded information, a really great value lens and the only actual m4:3 lens I have (I usually use old MF lenses and it was the ability to use MF lenses that I got a GF-1) but without the software correction it shows quite a few flaws. However the corrections are applied by LR and I haven't felt the need to apply any further correction, so I can't see the need for any profiles at least for this lens. If the correction profiles are as good for the other m 4:3's lenses I can't see Adobe bothering to build its own.

    It's a pity that CaniKon don't pass on their own profiles to Adobe. As Canon doesn't sell any software (it gives it away) I can't see what is stopping them I assume Nikon are unlikely to co operate as they have software to sell and as for Leica..they aren't going to admit that their lenses have any flaws anyway!!!

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 8, 2010 4:44 PM   in reply to Pete Marshall

    Pete, I think you have missed the point here, the mFourthirds lens design require that there is further corrections via camera firmware/computer software to achieve acceptable rendition. Other manufacture lenses are designed to give acceptable results as is.

     

    Depending on the design features of these lenses there are corrections that can be applied to optimize the rendition. For instance lenses designed for slr film cameras may require more correction than more modern lenses designed for dslr cameras. Also the higher grade lenses which cost much more than the normal/kit lenses reguire less correction. That is where the special profiles come in to provide optimizing performance.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 8, 2010 11:49 PM   in reply to DdeGannes

    Not sure how I have missed the point......all lenses require a degree of correction, irrespective of their cost or age. Some of the least distorting lenses I own are very, very old lenses certainly not designed for digital. However they are very soft in comparison to modern lenses. I also own recent L series Canon lenses which require considerable correction in software. In the case of Canon lenses a correction profile is supplied for these by Canon which works with Canon software on the RAW files. This is not the same as the profile Adobe have had to build themselves. In the case of m 4:3 lenses the manufacturer profiles have been supplied and used by LR for some time. If by normal lenses you mean normal on 35 mm film (45-50mm) these usually require the least correction of any lenses. If by kit lenses you ,mean lenses that come with camera bodies as standard, the only lens I have which came with a body was an old Olympus 50 mm f1.8 lens, this requires hardly any correction even on a 5 D, whilst the 16-35mm f2.8 II, L lens I regularly use on a 1 d mk II requires more correction than any other lens I own...even on a cropped sensor (it is however very sharp)! Modern lenses are optimised for sharpness and to reduce CA, this does not mean that the distortions that lens correction is for is better, in fact it is usually worse than old lenses.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 9, 2010 2:47 AM   in reply to clvrmnky

    clvrmnky wrote:

     

    Oh, Canon, Nikon do embed a lot of this information in their raw files.  They just don't fully share the details of this information with others...

     

    Click here if you want to check the facts.

     

    R

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 9, 2010 3:31 AM   in reply to Pete Marshall

    Pete, I agree with the fact that "all lenses require a degree of correction" however with respect to mFourThirds lenses this is a requirement by design.

     

    Maybe I am the one that is mistaken, since I was not aware that other manufacturers make lenses that require digital correction by design. .

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 8:18 AM   in reply to DdeGannes

    What if you are using a lens with a different manufacturer?I have an Olympus PL1 and I use Panasonic Lumix lenses, which is very common and possibly the norm for Oly u4/3 users. From what I've read the Panasonic body will automatically correct for the lens in its internal JPEG engine, but that certainly won't help me any and thus I have to correct in Lightroom.

     

    I actually came into this forum specificially to look for a lens profile for a Panny 45-200 Lumix G, which is not included in LR 3.3. Unless this is handeled in the RAW file created by an Olympus body, this seems like we can't dismiss this as unnecessary.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 8:58 AM   in reply to abatterbury

    Panasonic and Olympus provide a joint update service for updating M43 bodies and lenses to ensure that their equipment interworks correctly. Additionally lens firmware can be updated with the lens mounted on a body from either company.

     

    It is an essential part of the M43 design that lens correction is supported in the camera body. The downside is that new body firmware may be required every time a new lens is released.

     

    I regularly use a Panasonic 20mm and a 45-200mm with my E-P1 and process the raw files in LR3 without feeling the need for any additional profiles.

     

    Ian

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 2:36 PM   in reply to PevenseyPirate

    Hi Ian,

    PevenseyPirate wrote:

     

    It is an essential part of the M43 design that lens correction is supported in the camera body.


     

    Very interesting...

     

    So does the lens correction get baked into jpegs, or can you benefit from the in-camera lens correction support even when shooting raw?

     

    Just curious...

     

    Rob

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 2:46 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    The raw conversion software provided will make the necessary corrections. It just means other third party software providers would have to create profiles to also cater for the needed lens corrections to produce an acceptable initial preview.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 2:49 PM   in reply to DdeGannes

    Ah - and this is something Lightroom does for some cameras / lenses, just not all yet, right?


     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 2:59 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Its just a business decision by Olympus and Panasonic in creating the Mini 4:3 system. Lenses were created with minimal size but which required correction in the software/firmware. The cost of producing lenses to near perfect specs which did not require correction would have been prohibitive.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 3:05 PM   in reply to DdeGannes

    DdeGannes wrote:

     

    Lenses were created with minimal size but which required correction in the software/firmware.

     

    Sounds like a good idea in the modern computer age. I was just curious the level of support in Lightroom for this.

     

     

    R

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 3:43 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    There are no Panasonic and Olympus Lenses in the list of lens profiles in LR 3.3. So I expect that whatever lens corrections they are making to the m4:3's cameras they probably obtained from the camera manufacturers. In addition there are only Adobe Standard camera profiles available for supported cameras no camera specific profiles.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 4:03 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    LR has always supported the lens profile mechanism of m 4:3 Panasonic lenses. They had this support before the inclusion of the lens profile support in LR 3 and I would guess that the Panasonic mechanism was shared with Adobe right from the start. It is in the interest of Panasonic to push the m 4:3 system and Adobe to develop software to do what previously required very high end lenses. It certainly works.

    The quality of images taken with the Panasonic 20 mm f1.7 lens is absolutely remarkable given that it costs less than £300. Never required the slightest manual lens correction in LR on either a GF or GH body.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 4:10 PM   in reply to Pete Marshall

    ambienttroutmask wrote:

     

    Never required the slightest manual lens correction in LR on either a GF or GH body.

     

    I think I've got it - its an alternative to the profile-based auto-corrections, so you'll never see these lens profiles in the lens corrections section of the develop module, yeah?

     

    R

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 5:23 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    No you don't see them. They were there even in LR 2 which didn't have the lens profile correction. LR reads the metadata automatically that is written at time of capture. Other RAW editors also read the data and apply it. Silly Pix, Capture One (I think). Some don't,. I have LightZone and this doesn't read the metadata, the lens is quite distorted when viewed in LightZone.

     

    The profiles read the lens and camera metadata and then apply a profile, whereas the M 4:3's system writes the profile directly into the RAW file and can be read by any RAW processor that chooses to implement the system as I understand the 4:3's group (which includes Adobe) shares the data amonst members.

     

    Obviously you can also create profiles of your own, but these will sit on top of the RAW profile.

     

    I don't see what is to stop any manufacturer following the same path, but it does mean sharing this data. It is in the interest of Panasonic and Olympus to work with Adobe. They are all members of the 4:3's group. Neither Olympus or Panasonic make software and Adobe doesn't make cameras. They have a mutual business interest in developing the format. This doesn't apply in the case of Canon or Nikon. Both Canon and Nikon embed metadata corrections for some lenses on some bodies. This data is available for Adobe to use, but they don't and instead develop their own (perhaps superior) system.

     

    In economic terms Adobe are attempting to commoditise cameras and lenses in order to sell software solutions. Cheaper cameras and lenses suits Adobe as more people buy cameras and more people require software to use those cameras. Panasonic by using software solutions to problems that previously required expensive hardware can undercut other camera manufacturers on price, whilst maintain quality. The price point of the G series cameras and lenses must be putting a lot of pressure on both Canon and Nikon at the moment.  Makes business sense for Adobe and Panasonic to work closely together.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 5:32 PM   in reply to Pete Marshall

    I now realize the answers to all of this had already been given above - my apologies for not reading more thoroughly.

     

    Thanks for the info just the same.

     

    Rob

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2011 5:59 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Ditto that - I now have the answer to a bunch of questions that I'd had for a while (and a few questions were answered before they occurred to me). Much appreciated!

     

    --Alex

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points