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Best export settings for HD video to DVD

Sep 22, 2010 4:02 PM

hello, I now use premier pro cs5, from cs4 on my mac, love it, but I shoot with a cannon XL H1s HD video, my questiion is when viewing video from camera or on the screen in cs5, perfect hd picture, but when I export to DVD, i see in the media encoder if I choose mpeg2-DVD it goes output to 720x480, how do I export to dvd for the best HD seetings for DVD to get a HD playback on the DVD, now I see an OK video on the TV playback, but not the same as the original recording, can anyone help,, thanks in advance for any help.....

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2010 4:05 PM   in reply to artisan3425

    Welcome to the forum.

     

    To get full HD with more than moments of Duration, you will want to author a BD (Blu-ray Disc), at use either MPEG-2 HD, or H.264, the accepted BD formats.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2010 4:52 PM   in reply to artisan3425

    Artisan, everybody experiences the same outcome as you when compressing HD video to standard definition.

    You use the correct codec (MPEG-2) in the process. What you can do to further improve the quality of the SD footage is to raise the bitrate

    to 8 mbps. I output my HD files using the MPEG-BD codec and bump the bitrate to the max (40 mbps). Only then can I approximate the quality of the original footage. You can see now how much information and detail one lose when one's bitrate is merely 8 mbps (SD video) compared to the 40 mbps of the HD video. Hope this helps.

     
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    Sep 22, 2010 5:28 PM   in reply to artisan3425

    If you have clients with only DVD players, I would down-rez the HD material to SD and burn a DVD for them. You might find Jeff Bellune's tutorial, linked in this ARTICLE, useful for this process.

     

    For those with BD players, then do a full-rez BD for those.

     

    One can put HD/BD material onto a DVD disc, BUT it will be a very, very short duration, and a DVD player will not be able to handle the HD material. IMHO, doing that is a waste of time and with no decent results. For some background on DVD and BD, this ARTICLE might be useful, as it links to Jim Taylor's DVD Demystified site.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Sep 22, 2010 5:35 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt
    function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

    the_wine_snob wrote:


    One can put HD/BD material onto a DVD disc, BUT it will be a very, very short duration, and a DVD player will not be able to handle the HD material. IMHO, doing that is a waste of time and with no decent results. For some background on DVD and BD, this ARTICLE might be useful, as it links to Jim Taylor's DVD Demystified site.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt


    Yes one can put about 20 minutes HD on a dvd just to save having to burn to DB. One still needs a BD-player but the quality is excellent.

    I do it all the time.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2010 6:45 PM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Ann,

     

    Thank you. I did not recall what the limited Duration was, but 20 mins. sounds about right.

     

    Appreciated,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2010 8:32 PM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Ann, I did not know that you could burn a short BD on a standard DVD disk and play it in a BD player.  This is great for testing footage w/o the expense of a BD disk.  Thanks for the tip.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2010 8:36 PM   in reply to DVDmike

    BD-RE disks are also good for that task, just like DVD-R/W disks were good for testing/review purposes.

     
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    Sep 22, 2010 8:50 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    This discussion has me thinking of another idea that I'd like some input on.  For short run SD initiated projects, is there any quality gain to be had by encoding them as a BD?  If I encode SD at 8mb, I could encode this same footage to 20 or 30 mb and put it on a DVD (or blu ray disk) and play it back on Blu Ray player.  If I did this, would I see any quality difference in the final product for 720x480 source input and output?  I am just wondering if anyone has any experience trying this.  I suppose that it might depend on the source material?

     
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    Oct 27, 2010 12:34 PM   in reply to artisan3425

    Look like many people have same probleme  like me!!!

     

    my question is at list how to get raw SD footage quality on DVD I'm doing from Premiere CS5 straight to Encore so on my understanding i'm not converting it only Encore converts it and i raise the bitrate  to 9.4 best what encore can do for DVD but still quality is not same as on SD Raw footage, for BR i get the quality pretty close with 40 MBPS ............is somebody can help me......

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 27, 2010 5:55 PM   in reply to DVDmike

    How can you burn Blu ray on a DVD? I tried and my Blu Ray burner says wrong media?

    Thanks

    Mitchell

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 9:01 PM   in reply to artisan3425

    Hey Artisan, just wondering what progress you've made since posting this. I'm in a similar position with my sports videography business and looking for better solutions. I'm wondering if maybe there is a better codec out there (Divx?) that would improve the quality of my products on DVD.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 10:31 PM   in reply to APPJoey

    Your only option for DVD is MPEG2.  If you want better than that, you need Blu-ray.

     
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    Jul 12, 2012 10:41 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    What I have been doing is exporting to AVI - DV Widescreen. Then I import the avi file into Windows DVD Maker.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2012 5:06 AM   in reply to APPJoey

    That is not the way to go for HD to SD.

    If you want to encode in 3rd party software (or do not want to use Dynamic Link for Encore)

    DV avi is not a lossless codec.

    Use uncompressed, a lossless intermadiaire codec or frameserve .

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2012 7:38 AM   in reply to austcoll@nectar.com.au

    >How can you burn Blu ray on a DVD?

     

    BluRay image on a DVD http://forums.adobe.com/thread/871854

    AVCHD direct to BluRay http://forums.adobe.com/message/2785066

    AND a possible workaround http://forums.adobe.com/thread/706465

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 9:39 AM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Hello Ann, I would be willing to pay for your expertise if you can help me solve my problem or at least improve my workflow. If you are interested, please email me at memovid AT aol DOT com.

     

    Thanks!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 9:27 AM   in reply to APPJoey

    APPJoey,

     

    In an open forum, like this one, you might want to mung your POP address, something like this "____ AT ___ DOT ___," (mine gets written as "info AT huntphoto DOT com") so that spam'bots do not harvest that e-dress. Most people can figure out that AT = @ and DOT = . and if they cannot, you can always give 'em short instructions.

     

    I did not reply to your post with the e-dress, so that you can go in and edit it, provided that no one else Replies directly to it - then only a MOD can edit it for you.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 9:40 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks Bill! I was hoping you were going to take me up on my offer but your friendly advice is much appreciated!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 10:54 AM   in reply to APPJoey

    No problem. I just do not want your InBox filled with spam.

     

    In this case, I think that Ann is a better source for you.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jul 14, 2012 11:16 AM   in reply to APPJoey

    You can also send a PM (private message), which is an even better option than posting email address in the open forum.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 24, 2012 12:39 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    I've recently shot a short 7 minute Full HD video that I have edited in Pr CS5 and am looking to export it to the highest possible quality that will play on a DVD player. I will then be creating a DVD in Adobe Encore. What would you suggest the settings should be to achieve the best possible quality on the DVD (both in Pr and En).

     

    I tried my first export using the default/automatic mpeg2-DVD settings and then authored the DVD in Encore, but the quality was terrible! The titles, still images and video looked quite blurry and appeared to 'shake' on the screen.

     

    EDIT- I have just tried to increase the minimum/target/maximum bitrate of the Pr export settings to 9Mbps, hoping that it will give me a much higher quality of file. Estimated Time Remaining: 03:07:32 & 16% complete, so i'll report back soon'ish

     
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    Jul 24, 2012 10:57 PM   in reply to ShackyC

    I found (via a friend who is experienced in Pr & En) that it all comes down to the export/authoring settings.

     

    In Pr, my export settings needed to be adjusted as follows:

     

    1. Format: MPEG2-DVD
    2. Preset: PAL Progressive Widescreen High Quality
    3. Selected 'DVD' in the Basic Settings section of the
    4. Multiplexer tab (this creates a single mpeg file rather than a m2v file which has a separate video and audio file)
    5. Selected the highest possible quality (5) in the Basic Video Settings section of the Video tab, changed the TV Standard to PAL (to suit Australian TVs) and then
    6. Set the minimum/target/maximum bitrate settings to 8Mbps (when I set it at 9Mbps, the final file had too high a bitrate for DVD)
    7. In the Audio tab, I selected PCM as the audio type.
    8. I also ensured that the Use Maximum Render Quality checkbox was ticked at the bottom of the export settings window.

     

    Then I exported.

     

    Once encoding was complete I opened Encore, started a new project, selected DVD as the authoring mode and PAL as the Television Standard within the Basic settings for the new project. I then imported the final mpeg file as a timeline into Encore, set all the appropriate first play/title button/end play functions as necessary, then I opened the Edit Quality Presets window from the File menu and made the following settings;

     

    1. Format: MPEG2-DVD
    2. Presets: PAL DV High quality 8Mb CBR 1 Pass
    3. Basic Video Settings - Quality: set to maximum (5)
    4. Basic Video Settings - Field Order: None (Progressive)
    5. Basic Video Settings - Pixel Aspect Ratio: Widescreen 16:9
    6. Basic Video Settings - Bitrate Settings - Bitrate [Mbps]: set to maximum (9)
    7. Basic Audio Settings - Audio Format Settings: Audio Format: PCM
    8. click OK

     

     

    Then I authored the DVD and was quite pleased with the result. Still not quite to the quality I was hoping for (i.e. the quality of a DVD movie), but still a significant improvement on my initial attempts using default Pr & En settings.

     

    Hope it helps

     
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    Jul 25, 2012 12:16 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    Another issue that I just discovered is that one of the 7 Audio Tracks i've used appears to be out of sync in the exported mpeg file. I'm currently updating Pr and hoping that that might fix it, however looking at some of the discussions out there on the interwebs, i'm not hopeful this will fix the issue. As the file i'm working on is a music video, having one of the vocal tracks out of sync is massively obvious and severely impacts on the final product.

     

    any suggestions on this one?

     
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    Jul 25, 2012 2:28 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    artisan3425 wrote:

     

    Thankyou, what if we use standard DVD discs, can we this HD settings to standard DVD disc, we shoot events in HD, and deliver lots of discs, not everyone has blu-ray players, and blu-rays are much more expensive, hard to pass that expense on , thanks for you help, my export settings show MPEG2-DVD or MPEG2-Blu-Ray

     

    I know I'm late to the pary on this one, but if you think about this for a second,  if DVDs could do HD and play it back on a DVD player, why would they have bothered to invent Blu-ray?

     

    DVD players are standard definition.  End of Story.  The fact that some Blu-ray players (but not all) will read Blu-ray encoded material from a DVD as well as Blu-ray discs (albeit much shorter) doesn't change the fact that DVD players won't be able to play it.

     

     

    ShackyC wrote:

     

    Another issue that I just discovered is that one of the 7 Audio Tracks i've used appears to be out of sync in the exported mpeg file. I'm currently updating Pr and hoping that that might fix it, however looking at some of the discussions out there on the interwebs, i'm not hopeful this will fix the issue. As the file i'm working on is a music video, having one of the vocal tracks out of sync is massively obvious and severely impacts on the final product.

     

    any suggestions on this one?

     

    If it's out of sync in an older version it's likely to be out of sync after you upgrade too.    When ever I found a track was out of sync I could always trace it back to the source sequence as being the problem.

     

    Turn off all the other tracks and listen to just that one, at the start, middle and end, and check to see if the time is drifting at all.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 25, 2012 3:24 AM   in reply to ExactImage

    I've checked the tracks in question and both appear to be fine. I can't work out why they would be falling out of sync during export.

     
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    Jul 25, 2012 3:33 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    If you select the audio in question, then perform a "Render and Replace" from the menu, is it still in sync?

     

    If you are hesitant to do this on your timeline, either duplicate the sequence and try it there, or make a copy of this audio, disable the orignal and do it to the copy.

     

    Depending on the codec and smaple rate strange things could happen.  If you allow Premiere Pro to do a render and replace *and* it's still in sync when you play it back it's probably going to be OK on export too.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 25, 2012 3:38 AM   in reply to ExactImage

    Sorry ExactImage, I can't seem to find Render and Replace in the menu?

     

    EDIT: Found it in 'Edit in Soundbooth' > Render & Replace

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 25, 2012 3:41 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    No No No .... not in soundbooth.....

     

    First, select the audio clip in question then in the menu .....

     

     

    Cip --> Audio Options --> Render and Replace
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 25, 2012 4:58 AM   in reply to ExactImage

    ExactImage, just rendered the audio file in Sb and then played it in Pr and it was out of sync like in the exported file....

     

    http://www.whosawesome.com/images/awesome.jpg

     

    Hoping it will work after export now

     

    found that doing it via Clip>Audio Options>Render and Replace did the exact same thing, but was much easier as I could select all of my clips and R&R at the same time (when doing it via File>Edit in Soundbooth>Render and Replace you can only do it one clip at a time).

     

    thanks again!

     
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    Jan 25, 2013 4:17 PM   in reply to Igor Valentovitch

    Igor [reply no.3] - Would your comment about bit rates possibly affect the quality of rendering titles?

     
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    Jul 23, 2013 9:37 PM   in reply to ShackyC

    What I am trying to work out, is that I've just completed another DVD using these settings and even though the footage was all full-HD, the final exported video was less than 8 minutes long and was almost 500MB in size, yet it still doesn't 'look' anywhere near as good as DVD movies.

     

    I'm wondering how studios get a three hour feature onto a 5Gb DVD and get it to look so good.

     

    Surely if i'm using full-HD footage, I should be able to get that same footage to look as close to HD as you can get on a DVD...

     

    any comments?

     
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    Jul 23, 2013 9:50 PM   in reply to ShackyC

    I have not seen too many 3 hour features films on a single layer DVD.  Can you name one?

     
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    Jul 23, 2013 9:59 PM   in reply to DVDmike

    The one I tried to do last month... Gotta make the the m2v file with a different program. Also, the quality is extremely awful... like, really bad.

     
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    Jul 23, 2013 11:39 PM   in reply to DVDmike

    Really Mike? THAT is the point you want to discuss from my post? Perhaps focus on the question i'm asking...

     

    <EDIT> i.e. why do commercial feature DVD's have such good quality for such 'large' files and yet it is so difficult to get the best possible quality image into relatively small files?

     
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    Jul 24, 2013 12:20 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    If you get your hands on such a dvd you could in theory pull one of the VOB files and drop it into something like gSpot or Media Coder to see what it's made of... but in my experience it never really helps you to match back the export setting for setting... but it's good info.

     
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    Jul 24, 2013 5:58 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    This is a a much better question:

     

    i.e. why do commercial feature DVD's have such good quality for such 'large' files and yet it is so difficult to get the best possible quality image into relatively small files?

     

    Than:

     

    how do studios get a three hour feature onto a 5Gb DVD and get it to look so good

     

    If you ask the three hour question, a proper response would be that they use dual layer discs.

     
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    Jul 24, 2013 8:15 AM   in reply to ShackyC

    why do commercial feature DVD's have such good quality

     

    Several reasons.  For starters, most Hollywood DVDs start out on film or digital cinema.  Second, the studios use expert compressionists with $50,000 tools for the creation process.  Your HD video and Adobe tools just can't compete.

     
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