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Best Digital SLR Camera???

Jan 7, 2011 7:22 PM

I normally habitate the Premiere and Photoshop forums, but my wife is starting photography.  She's going to do the photography for our sons wedding and also planning on taking photos of Discoverys last launch.  Of course, she'll want a camera that can take many pictures in a burst mode.  She seems to be leaning towards the Canon EOS 7D.

 

Does anyone have any constructive hints, regarding her impending purchase?  Thanks in advance

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 7, 2011 8:15 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    I'm not much of a photo-enthusiast either, not professionally anyway, but your choice in going with Canon is probably wise as

    they provide the largest array of lenses for their cameras, and the EOS line is excellent.  I don't know much about the actual model you

    mention, but I would definitely invest in a good long-distance-range lens (telephoto) as well as the one that comes typically with the body+kit.  That will become especially important in documenting the Space Shuttle launch.  If I were you I would much rather invest money in a video camera that is capable of a long-range zoom with HD quality so that the Shuttle launch can be captured on video.  An instructor once told me "It's always sexier if it moves".  Some video cameras are capable of grabbing stills from moving footage, so definitely explore that option.  And there is nothing like capturing the moving images of the dances at weddings (although believe it or not I've never actually been to a wedding before).

     

    Hope that gets the discussion rolling.  When is the Discovery launch by the way?

     

    -markerline

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 7, 2011 8:16 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    Probably a better idea to enjoy your son's wedding and hire a professional.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 7, 2011 8:42 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    In some cases you will want to take shots with the camera removed from the tripod, so try to find a tripod that has enough stability and weight but with a quick release system that is easy to use to capture those moments that only come in a flash, no pun intended.  If the shutter speed is high enough and the lighting is good I don't really see a need for a tripod, especially to capture moments where people are conversing with one another and the tripod would just get in the way. (We're talking about the wedding here, not the Discovery launch).  If you have a large enough hard drive on your computer and a good backup hard drive or set of hard drives then go for the Canon EOS that has the most megapixels available without going overboard on your budget.  I spoke with a Canon tech analyst recently and he said the Rebel line has at its highest range 18MP which is more than double what my Rebel XT has (8MP).  With Film Photography you could keep the same camera for years because the resolution of film didn't change that often, but with the digital side you have the huge advantage of seeing your shots instantly on the LCD display as well as being able to capture many many more photos on a single card.  Make sure the camera is compatible with Windows Vista and Windows 7 as well as the 64-bit versions of those operating systems.  Also make sure that if you decide to shoot in RAW format that Photoshop has the latest RAW compatibility drivers from Canon.  I understand that RAW is better for professional purposes but JPG takes up much less space on the hard drive.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 7, 2011 9:52 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    I don't say get a professional from the tech side but rather so that you can

    savor the beauty of the day and better tend to your family and guests.

    It's one day you're allowed to "take off" and just enjoy yourselves. You

    didn't see Vito Corleone taking pictures at his kid's wedding, did you? LOL

     

    On the camera side, Canon and Nikon spend a lot on advertising; you may be

    wise to investigate Sony and Pentax.

    Pentax K5 just bested all of it's class. Less expensive, better body

    (titanium), weather sealed, anti shake built into body, mostly any lens ever

    built for their 35mm cameras (plus Minolta lenses) will work on their

    digital lineup.

     

    Good luck.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2011 6:58 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    I was Canon fan for last 30 yrs, was planning on 7D purchase until I let go of my feelings and started comparing apples to apples. Nikon D7000 won my heart and have not regret it. More features 2 card slots smaller and lighter. Video feature whipps Canon. Because of recent years popularity Canon  used lens are higher price than Nikon. Although both products are known for quality lens, Nikon has always held the lead there. I believe you will have less exspene in Niko also. Happy hunting!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2011 7:50 PM   in reply to Mengo55

    Recent Pentax K5 will beat all in its class.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2011 11:16 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    I too opted for the EOS 7D and find it to be an extremely capable camera, as I use mine for underwater photography.  Thanks for sharing the Discovery Launch.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 1, 2011 11:00 AM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    Thanks for all the info.  My wife has a blog with quite a bit of food photography and so far she's just used a canon digital rebel that we pickted up at Costco.  It's been pretty amazing to see what she can do with it and just a few pieces of white styrofoam to create a bit of lighting.  I'm definitely going to look into the 7D or other suggestions here

    Edited by host to remove url.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2011 3:01 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    Its subjective, but a solid professional digital camera is the Canon 5D Mark ii.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 16, 2011 1:47 AM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    It is a hard question that you are asking, I have the two extremes myself, a Nikon D40 6mp and two Sony A900 24mp full frame cameras I use for my photography business. The high res cameras are not nessessarily a boon as they show up any not perfect technique, I have more blurred photos from subtle camera shake from the Sonys despite their good image stabilisation because of the high level of detail they pick up. I dont know why that is but everybody says it and its true. BOTH Nikon and Sony have the ability to use old lenses that are suprisingly good and dirt cheap, the older Minolta glass that Sonys use  is generally of a high standard and I also like my old Nikon lenses although I have to say that my 50mm F2 Nikon lens is not as sharp as my 50mm F1.7 Minolta which olny costs $40 or $50at most. I do love my Zeiss 16-35mm lens though. I have to say that I am not as impressed by most of the Canon glass that I have owned, they do have some great lenses but its more rare than the norm compared to the consistency of the others. What you should do is go for the brand of camera that suits the lenses you do have, in my case I didn't because I need the built in stabilisation of the Sony for low light inside work. It works with any lens including very wideangles, which is something you cant buy in a lens with the other manufacturers.  For sports, the Nikons focus the fastest so they would be my pick. Have a look at the Sonys like the a580, they have some impressive features at a cheaper price than Canon or Nikon. Also, the Sony A850 is cheaper than the Canon 5D Mk11 over here in New Zealand.The megapixels are a bit of a have, the more you have the more noise you get, the Nikon D3s uses the Sony 24mp sensor and the Nikon D700 has the lowest high iso of any of the FF cameras at 12mp. Also, believe me, these big file sizes slow down your computer, my core2duo wasn't cutting it and I had to put together an i7 with solid state drive to avoid going crazy. The only thing against the Sony's ant the moment is that they are a consumer giant and who knows how long they support a camera whereas Canon and Nikon are dedicated camera manufacturers.

    Hope this helps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 30, 2011 8:46 AM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    The leader on the market are Nikon and Canon. If she likes the Canon EOS design and feel I wouldalso recommend the EOS 5 MarkII. Its a fast high quality cam with the advantages of a full format cam and a great price. I love to work with it. you can find examples of the cam on <a href="http://www.christiansiebold-fotografie.de">(German Fotograf in München+Frankfurt)</a>.The lens range of the system is almost the same.Hope this helps a bit for your decision.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 2, 2011 4:33 PM   in reply to DesignCBTs

    The EOS 7D is surely not the best but a very good camera.

    You might also want to look at the NIkon D7000. Sadly it doesnt have the same svively flippy screen as the D5100 has but both have the same sensor.

     
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