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tmveliotis
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Authoring DVD's for maximum player compatibility?

Mar 31, 2010 7:03 PM

I'm in the middle of a project using Premiere and then Encore for the first time to author and compile a DVD. I went crazy trying to figure out what I had done wrong, because when I tried playing the DVD in my Yamaha player, the minute it got to the menus it wouldn't allow me to select anything or do anything - however all the buttons and menus and chapter selection worked properly during the preview.

 

I was discussing it with a colleague who asked me to bring her the DVD to test as she has several different players at home - and it worked perfectly in all of hers. In the past I had authored my DVD's using Pinnacle Studio in Windows and never ran across this problem. I even tried a variety of brands in DVD mediat that I had available. I'm concerned that I may send the completed DVD to the several people who have purchased it and someone will have issues playing it as well.

 

Are there any tips or hints that someone can give me on how to make it more compatible? The format is there is a firstrun short slideshow, then it goes to the main menu which allows you to either play through the DVD in it's entirely or go to the chapter selection sub-menus.

 

Thank you for any possible suggestions.

Tina

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 1, 2010 8:23 AM   in reply to tmveliotis

    Read this, including all the links http://forums.adobe.com/thread/607390?tstart=0

     

    Pay special attention to the 2 brands recommended, and the work flow of Encore to ISO to Imgburn to disc at a SLOW burn speed

     
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    Apr 2, 2010 4:54 PM   in reply to tmveliotis

    Here is another THREAD worth reading. Here is a FAQ Entry from the Encore forum, that will give some more info.

     

    I strongly recommend burning at less than the max speed. As I buy slower blank media, I'm way down the speed list. Some will recommend going about 1/2 way between slowest and fastest. Regardless, the better the burn, the more likely it will be to play in more set-top players. A moment saved during the burn can easily be wasted if one has to do just one replacement disc.

     

    There are a couple other little things to think about: if you are doing DD 5.1 SS, then begin each Timeline with about 02 sec. of silence (this from your NLE program), to give players (especially higher-end players) time to lock onto the signal. Otherwise, one can loose the first few notes. I always begin with 02 sec. of Black Video, and my Audio does not begin, until after that.

     

    I am not at all a fan of adhesive labels. Besides the potential for out-of-balance, and parts of the label coming off at the higher RPM's of DVD's, some studies have indicated that over time, the adhesive's solvents can leach into the plastic carrier and degrade the dyes. For both my Taiyo Yuden and my Verbatims, I go with the printable and run them through my Epson R-1900.

     

    Also, remember that no DVD player is certified to play any burned DVD, but only replicated/pressed ones. Most will, but there is no guarantee. Using the highest grade blank media, and doing a slower-than-max burn, will go a long way to success. Right now, I have a pretty good average. With Taiyo Yuden blanks for DVD-5's and Verbatim for DVD-9's, with almost 2000 total discs delivered, I have had zero returns.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Sep 3, 2010 5:21 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    It's not really about the slower speed being a "better" burn, but simply one of the burn being good at all. Discs are rated for a certain zone of speed. You'll notice many burners (or burning apps) won't allow you to burn 1x-2x on a 16x disc. This is by design. A 16x discs is rated for "up to" 16x, and the quality fall-off is steep above that range. If you burn slower than 8x, the quality fall-off is steep there, too. Burning 2x on a 16x disc is as bad as burning it 20x. The "goldilocks zone" (to steal an astronomy term) is 0.5 to 1 full "x" steps below the max rating. On a 16x disc, that's 12x or 8x. A 1x, 2x or 4x burn is not a great idea here.This isn't me just blabbing either, this is backed up by a decade worth of thousands of hours of burning stats collected by The Digital FAQ. You can read some of their guides at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/guides/media

     

    Sticky labels mess up the balance of media, and causes discs to be unreadable. Rather than repeat information, I'm just going to link to that document, too. See http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/showthread.php/never-use-sticky-2159.h tml ... I would agree that labels can leach adhesives into CD materials, as it's just lacquer on foil. But that's more or less silly with DVD, as the adhesive would have to be HIGHLY ACIDIC to leach through the polycarbonate. I don't see that happening.

     

    Indeed, Taiyo Yuden or Mitsubishi (Verbatim) discs. Be careful about Verbatim, they are using some non-Mitsubishi media right now! You don't want the low-grade Verbatims (same quality as Memorex, yuck!) More on that warning at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/showthread.php/verbatims-dvd-r-2286.ht ml ... the DVD+R DL appear to be unaffected, all still MKM discs in use.

     
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    Feb 25, 2011 4:45 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks for the info. We are looking at purchasing a DVD tower duplicator with at least 10 drives that can do Blu-ray and maybe lightscribe. Does anyone have any recommendations?

     
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    Apr 19, 2011 4:02 PM   in reply to Neverends Productions

    Sorry to be so tardy, but I just have not dropped by the DVD Lounge that recently.

     

    Wish that I could help you, but I have no experience with duplication towers. I hope that Neil Wilkes drops by the thread, as I believe that he uses a couple.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 19, 2011 7:01 AM   in reply to Neverends Productions

    Neverends Productions wrote:

     

    Thanks for the info. We are looking at purchasing a DVD tower duplicator with at least 10 drives that can do Blu-ray and maybe lightscribe. Does anyone have any recommendations?

    I'd build my own tower, and stack it out with Plextor PX-LB950SA.

    It's a 12x BD write, 16x DVD write device with LightScribe.

    They do not get much better than Plextor, plus you get PlexTools.....

     

    Software? GEAR Pro Mastering Edition for a tower.

     
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    Mar 31, 2012 2:26 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Speed is everything, for the most part between 4x and 8x is best depending on the burner. The reason is between 4x and 8x is where burners and/or the sw will switch from CLV (constant linear velocity) to Z-CLV (multiple sections of differing CLV) and CAV (Constant angular velocity) from 8-12x. Older and less expensive DVD players will only read CLV reliably and will skip or lock up at Z-CLV boundaries and will not read CAV at all. Almost the same exact issue with CDs years ago, audio players and older CD ROMs would only read CLV but many didn't like to burn at the slower speeds because it reduced the read speeds on the computer CD and made it sound like a leaf blower when it hit the final tracks.

     

    If the burner support it, programs like Nero will force DVD video content to be written CLV even if it is burning at a higher rate, if not it will force 4x or even 2.4. Images written at slow speed are also a mixed bag, some burning programs will obey the slow format track written no matter the speed burned, others will rewrite the data or allow the burner to change states, sometimes creating a nice coaster or a CAV disc that can't be read by your target device.

     

    The second reason for 4-8x is media. Some are overly optimized for 16x burning, you'll get a good burn even with a weak laser at 16x. Problem is these disks are highly succeptible to sun/heat damage and are damaged by burns slower than 4x as the highly reactive dye that makes good for 16x takes in too much heat and degrades in overly slow burns.

     
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    Apr 1, 2012 8:58 AM   in reply to ty2010bc

    ty2010bc wrote:

     

    Speed is everything, for the most part between 4x and 8x is best depending on the burner. The reason is between 4x and 8x is where burners and/or the sw will switch from CLV (constant linear velocity) to Z-CLV (multiple sections of differing CLV) and CAV (Constant angular velocity) from 8-12x. Older and less expensive DVD players will only read CLV reliably and will skip or lock up at Z-CLV boundaries and will not read CAV at all. Almost the same exact issue with CDs years ago, audio players and older CD ROMs would only read CLV but many didn't like to burn at the slower speeds because it reduced the read speeds on the computer CD and made it sound like a leaf blower when it hit the final tracks.

     

    If the burner support it, programs like Nero will force DVD video content to be written CLV even if it is burning at a higher rate, if not it will force 4x or even 2.4. Images written at slow speed are also a mixed bag, some burning programs will obey the slow format track written no matter the speed burned, others will rewrite the data or allow the burner to change states, sometimes creating a nice coaster or a CAV disc that can't be read by your target device.

     

    The second reason for 4-8x is media. Some are overly optimized for 16x burning, you'll get a good burn even with a weak laser at 16x. Problem is these disks are highly succeptible to sun/heat damage and are damaged by burns slower than 4x as the highly reactive dye that makes good for 16x takes in too much heat and degrades in overly slow burns.

    Absolutely.

    This is why I always makesure that the birner & the discs are matched.

    All masters go via DDP/CMF or else DLT tape, and never as a written playable disc - although one usually gets sent along as a reference disc.

     
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    Apr 1, 2012 9:03 AM   in reply to LordSmurf

    LordSmurf wrote:

     

    Indeed, Taiyo Yuden or Mitsubishi (Verbatim) discs. Be careful about Verbatim, they are using some non-Mitsubishi media right now! You don't want the low-grade Verbatims (same quality as Memorex, yuck!) More on that warning at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/showthread.php/verbatims-dvd-r-2286.ht ml ... the DVD+R DL appear to be unaffected, all still MKM discs in use.

    It's risky using anything other than +R DL media for anything, as with -R DL you have a fixed layer break for burned media that cannot be adjusted.

     
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