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Discs beginning not to work anymore :(

Aug 26, 2011 2:21 AM

Hey, i have CS4 Production Premium. I reinstalled Windows yesturday for a nice clean start, and of corse this involved re-installing all of CS4. However, i think its going to have problems soon....

Production Premium is on 4 main discs to install, however disc 4 seems to be beginning not to work 90% of the time -.-

I finally got it to carry on the instalation by keep ejecting and reinserting the disc (none of the discs have any visible damage on them), but in the end it said it installed "with errors". So i followed what it said to  do ( restart, then try to reinstall and it should fix itself).

I figured it had done this because when i tried it installed a bunch of codecs and stuff from after effects and premier pro, but ive noticed not they all *seem* to work with the exception on Photoshop cs4 32bit only. Ill try to fix that with another reinstall soon, but my main question is:

Is it possible to copy everything from the discs (when they work), and one day reinstall the programs like that? Or does it always require to be on disc to install properly?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 3:59 AM   in reply to Ricky-T

    It is a good practice to back up valuable media.

     

    If you are concerned about legal copying, read the EULA and realize that you are safe to back up.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 7:57 AM   in reply to Ricky-T

    As Marian mentioned, doing a backup of your installation media is a good thing, and can often "repair" a damaged disc. If you do not have a DVD copying utility, I recommend the great, free ImgBurn. It will make copies of your media (plus much more), and often the copy will be much better than the original. Even if it does not "fix" things, having the backups is a good thing.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - I strongly recommend only premium blank media, like Verbatim, or Taiyo-Yuden.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,523 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Aug 26, 2011 9:31 AM   in reply to Ricky-T

    Yes, you can install from an image on the hard drive.

     

    If you have a disc that reads with errors, try a different drive.  Different drives have different capabilities, and they can degrade too.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 10:14 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    If you have a disc that reads with errors, try a different drive.  Different drives have different capabilities, and they can degrade too.

     

    I strongly agree. That is why each workstation has two totally different brands of multi-drive, plus perhaps a BD burner.

     

    On my current, main workstation, I have a Plextor and an LG. Each handles certain discs, more easily than the other. Seems that the LG is most lenient, but I have encountered discs, that would ONLY read properly in the Plextor. I also have a handful of external multi-drives, and have had to press one, or another, into service with some really bad discs.

     

    Also, with two multi-drives, using a utility, like ImgBurn to make Copies is very easy, and fast - basically just the time to write, as the data does not have to be read, then written to the HDD, then read and finally written to the blank disc, after swapping the media out. With two multi-drives, the write comes moments after the read, and is almost coincidental.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 26, 2011 12:00 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    By the way, it's only loosely related to this thread, but I really like this bit of freeware for helping to manipulate disc images:

     

    http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 4:24 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt
    and often the copy will be much better than the original.

    Really? How? It's all digital right, not like analog says.

     

    Maybe describe the differences?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 4:34 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Lawrence,

     

    I wish that I had a direct answer, filled with 1's and 0's, but I do not. I only have many casual observations.

     

    I have had install discs, that would not read adequately, to allow installation FROM them. However, doing a Copy (as described above), has yielded copies, that DID install perfectly. I have encountered this oddity, maybe a dozen times, over the years, and have fielded many more responses, such as "hey, that worked!"

     

    This is pure speculation, but I would say that some pits are marginal, and when the installation module tries to access those, errors crop up, and perhaps time-outs. However, in the Copy phase, those pits are read, and duplicated in a more exacting way.

     

    Kind of like doing "the wiggly dance," while installing some Adobe programs - it seems to work, but I do not know why...

     

    Maybe some other, more informed person, will drop by, and tell us both how a straight Copy can "fix" things.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 26, 2011 4:37 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    It's all analog bubbles and laser reflections until some circuit turns it into 1s and 0s, Lawrence.

     

    We're talking about discs that are on the edge of being unreadable here, where the signal to noise ratio drops below a point where that can be reliably done.  A fresh copy written on good media by a good writer can be better than the original with regard to readability and reliability, assuming the copy process was able to read the original disc completely.

     

    Ever hear a disc reader retry a number of times, then finally read the data properly?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 4:38 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hunt said:

     

    Maybe some other, more informed person, will drop by, and tell us both how a straight Copy can "fix" things.

     

    Dang! That was fast. I knew that such a person was likely lurking, just waiting to comment with a pithy answer. Thank you Noel.

     

    Now, why does "the wiggly dance" work?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 26, 2011 4:47 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt said:

     

     

    Now, why does "the wiggly dance" work?


    You really want to know?

     

    My theory is that we are all a part of a grand universe simulation being run in a higher dimensional universe, probably by a graduate student at SBU*.  He's watching us, feeding us situations, and having a grand old time seeing what we do with them.

     

    -Noel

     

     

    *Supreme Being University

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 26, 2011 4:58 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Well, I can relate to that!

     

    Concerning the pits, if it doesn't read to generate the 1's and 0's, you will get a corrupt copy.

     

    This reminds me of the early days of audio CD's when people were coating the inside and outside edges of their cd's with a "special" pen that absorbed the IR which would reflect from the edge discontinuities between substrate and air. That turned out as phony as a 3 dollar bill.

     

    And don't get me started on cables!

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 26, 2011 5:00 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    What, you don't believe in gold-plated cables? 

     

    -Noel

     
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