Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

How would I go about creating my own font?

Oct 22, 2011 7:31 AM

I can't find the 'perfect' font for a particular logo.  How would I go about creating my own?

 

I have Illustrator and Photoshop.

 

Assuming I could create a set of alphabetic characters, would I be able to use them via Photoshop in the same way other PS fonts work?

 

thanks,

 

Paz

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 22, 2011 7:50 AM   in reply to _Paz_

    Illustrator and Photoshop are not enough. You need a font editing tool, such as FontLab Studio, FontForge, Fontographer, TypeTool, or Glyphs. They range in price from open source (free) to $600+. They allow you to turn a "set of alphabetic characters" into a font, and help with creating those glyphs.

     

    But having the software isn't the same as knowing what to do with it, any more than having Photoshop makes you a photographer. Your question is kind of like saying you can't find a good piece of music to have playing at your wedding reception, so how do you go about creating a symphony? Or you don't like the chair you've been sitting in, so how do you create a replacement? It's not that these things are impossible to learn, but the relevant skills are a substantial investment of time and energy.

     

    My serious answer would be study on your own for a year or so, and apply to the appropriate Master's degree program at the University of Reading (UK), or the Royal Academy in the Hague. Or the new program just starting up in Buenos Aires.

     

    Cheers,

     

    T

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 22, 2011 8:49 AM   in reply to _Paz_

    If all you really need are the letters for the logo, why don't you

    simply create the logo in illustrator? Some of your design may be in the

    shape of a word or letters, but they needn't be from a font. Most major

    commercial logos are uniquely drawn and do NOT use fonts. See, for

    example, Coca Cola, Adobe, and McDonalds. Unassociated people may have

    created a font based on those logos, but not the other way around.

     

    If you plan to use the same typestyle for arbitrary headlines or text,

    that's a different matter entirely - see Mr. Phinney's reply, which may

    in fact make it look too easy! Text fonts are infinitely more difficult

    than just a few nicely designed letters.

     

      - Herb

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 23, 2011 9:26 AM   in reply to HerbVB

    With due respect to Herb, often logos are a combination of a regular typeface and a graphic design. Sometimes the typeface is modified, sometimes not. Even among his three examples, Adobe's logo uses Myriad, McDonald's golden arches are a graphic, but used to be accompanied by the word "McDonald's" in Helvetica (if I recall correctly), and Although the Coca-Cola logotype is custom, for Diet Coke I believe the word "Coke" is set in a normal typeface (Times, IIRC).

     

    That being said, completely custom lettering and modified (even heavily modified) font usage are both quite common for logos as well.

     

    Cheers,

     

    T

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 23, 2011 4:52 PM   in reply to _Paz_

    To put it another way, and with all respect, anyone who needs to post the question is at least years away from acquiring the necessary skills to create a font.   

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 23, 2011 5:28 PM   in reply to Tai Lao

    Tai Lao said:

     

    "To put it another way, and with all respect, anyone who needs to post

    the question is at least years away from acquiring the necessary skills

    to create a font."

     

    That's a bit harsh. While it might be true if the desired end result is

    a quality text font, there are simple and inexpensive - even free - ways

    to produce functioning fonts - particularly if they're for a limited

    purpose.

     

    These include various services that produce a font from your handwriting

    (you don't HAVE to submit your pigeon-scratches, you CAN submit nicely

    drawn images of letters or even clipart). There's also the free on-line

    Fontstruct.com.

     

    No, you won't produce a multi-language multi-weight artistically

    superior, coordinated font family, but you WILL get something, and some

    of the results, particularly for display fonts, can be quite striking.

     

       - Herb

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 23, 2011 5:51 PM   in reply to _Paz_

    Re - Fontstruct - go to the website ( www.fontstruct.com )and see what

    it does and how it works. Essentially you use building blocks to put

    letters together. Go to the gallery to see what people have done with

    it. The individual letters/glyphs range from simple to very complex; the

    fonts as a whole are simple, and truetype only, if I recall.

     

      - Herb

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 24, 2011 5:08 PM   in reply to _Paz_

    I will just note that given what you want to do FontStruct probably may not work out. One thing it really can't do is script, handwriting or calligraphy fonts. It's about assembling letter shapes from sort of building blocks and shape primitives. Though it is very cool and fun, and perhaps worth checking out for those reasons alone. 

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points