Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Can my projects files be on an external hard drive or do they need to be on computers C: drive?

Nov 17, 2011 7:35 AM

Tags: #importing

PC Windows7 HP

Pr CS5 Master Collection for Education

 

"EXTERNAL OR INTERNAL - that is the question"

 

I have footage and audio files on an ext hd("2011 drive") 38.8 GB (5DM2 + zoom files).  Do I have to copy the folder to computers C: drive first before I import files to edit in Pr? I would like to work be able to just import from the hd and then work in Pr.  However, if it adds SPEED I'll copy folder to C: drive first. 

 

Does it make a difference?? Thanks.

 
Replies
  • joe bloe premiere
    4,391 posts
    Dec 6, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 17, 2011 7:47 AM   in reply to Maribeth R
     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 17, 2011 9:45 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    If the external is an eSATA 7200 disk, leave the media there. If it is slower either by connection (USB2, Firewire) or rotational speed, all you should do is copy it to your SATA 7200 D drive but not to C. If you don't have a physically separate D drive, go out and get at least one but preferably two extra 7200 SATA drives. It will make life so much easier. The minimum requirements for PR are AT LEAST  two physically separate SATA 7200 disks.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 1:38 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    You have several options, but I think the most affordable solution is, despite the high disk prices:

     

    • Get a 320 GB Samsung Spinpoint F4 disk for OS and programs. Yes it means a complete fresh install. Cost around € 82 over here.
    • Designate your current 2 TB drive as D.
    • Ideally get another internal SATA 7200 disk as drive E.
    • Use your current external for backup and possibly exports.

     

    The MyBook you linked to can be used over eSATA and replace the E drive above.

     

    Just as a rule of thumb you will see transfer rates on the various connections in the order of:

     

    • SATA: 100 - 130 MB
    • USB3: 70 - 90 MB
    • FW800: 50 - 70 MB
    • FW400: 30 - 45 MB
    • USB2: 20 - 25 MB

     

    Exports for most people are not time critical. When they are exporting, they usually take the export time for granted and do something else. That is why I said, possibly use the external for exports.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 4:15 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Could you add some more specs on your HP. There may be bigger road blocks.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 6:59 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    As I migrate Projects between different computers, I use external FW-800 HDD's, and all works fine. Using eSATA externals would be even quicker. This ARTICLE goes into some details, and also lists a caveat, or two, on using externals for Projects.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 9:19 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    There are several things that you can improve on that PC, given the less-than-optimal choice of a CPU in your system (an Intel i5-760, in your case):

     

    1) Get at least two additional hard drives (in addition to your current C:/D: drive, which is actually a single physical drive that's been partitioned into two volumes). In this case, since the 2TB drive is your OS drive, and you cannot reliably transfer all of the content onto another physical hard drive without messing up the recovery volume, both drives should be of equal (and relatively large, like 2TB) size and of the same 7200 RPM spindle speed - and move your media and project files to one of the new additional internal hard drives, and the pagefile, previews and media cache to the other new internal drive. As configured, you are currently using a single hard drive for absolutely everything - OS, programs, media cache, pagefile, previews and exports (the media is stored on a USB 2.0 external hard drive). Two volumes do not guarantee separate physical drives, in this case.

     

    2) Ditch the HD 4850, and go with a GTX 550 Ti for that i5-760 system. The i5-760 is not fast enough to take any advantage of a GTX 560 or higher for such video editing apps that tax both the CPU and GPU simultaneously.

     

    3) Upgrade the RAM from 6GB to 16GB. Premiere Pro CS5.x runs best with more than 12GB of RAM.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 10:04 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Harm,

     

    FW400 can theoretically transfer at 30-45 MB/s. However, many external hard drives and external hard drive enclosures with FW400 capability have horrible FW400 controllers - so much that transfers from those same enclosures would actually be faster through USB 2.0 (25-30 MB/s) than through FW400 (10-15 MB/s).

     

    In addition, the VIA FW400 controller onboard a lot of Asus motherboards is also slower than USB 2.0 in export performance (transfers from PC to device). That makes onboard FW400 on those Asus motherboards in question far better for ingesting (transferring from device to PC) than for exporting.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2011 11:09 PM   in reply to Maribeth R

    I would go for more balance rather than investing in a GTX570. A GTX 560 Ti is cheaper and will do.

     

    Ditch 1 2GB memory module (4) and install 2 X 4GB modules of the same speed. The same brand might be safest, but not a requirement.

     

    You need at least one dedicated video hard drive. I've had best luck with internal. A powered external may be less taxing on your PSU.

     

    The Power Supply (PSU) is often overlooked. You will want to get specs on your PSU. If it is under 500 watts, there may be issues. Hopefully it is 600-750 watts. Considering that you have a Radeon 4850 installed, it will likely handle swapping to a GTX card and adding a hard drive without issue.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 19, 2011 1:03 AM   in reply to Stephen_Spider

    It is a HP, so it is nearly impossibly without extensive modding to install a better PSU, because of the non-standard dimensions of the PSU in HP's. I agree with Stephen with regards to the memory and the 560.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 19, 2011 7:26 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    I also agree with Stephen with regards to the memory and the GPU. However, the plain, non-Ti GTX 560 is a better match to the i7-860 in a non-overclockable system: Even the GTX 560 Ti is a bit overkill. (Remember, in my brief testing with a borrowed i7-870 system it performed roughly as fast as a stock-speed i7-920 with the same components and the same amount of RAM.) Forget about the GTX 570 in that system since it needs an overclocked i7-2600K+ or a hexa-core CPU for the 570 to be taken full advantage of.

     

    In addition, the GTX 560 Ti itself is transitioning from its original 384-core design to a slightly more power-hungry design with 448 cores. That's because the 560 Ti is migrating from the GF114 GPU to a cut version of the GF110 used in the GTX 570 and GTX 580. This may allow the original 384-core GTX 560 Ti to drop the "Ti" moniker and be sold as the plain GTX 560. In turn, the current plain GTX 560 may be renamed the GTX 560 SE.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 22, 2011 1:13 PM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Maribeth,

     

    The problem with the HD 6870 is that it, like all other ATi or AMD GPUs, is not supported at all in CS5's MPE GPU accelerated mode. Therefore, all ATi GPUs will force CS5 to run only in MPE software-only mode.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2011 2:16 PM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Maribeth, since you have one empty memory slot now, you should get 2 memory modules, both 4GB.

     

    Also, as stated before, it would be a huge waste to get a non-Nvidia GTX card for Premeire use. To be clear to a point, it is a big deal.

     

    Best of luck.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 18, 2011 1:49 AM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Mac?.....

     

    NO.

     

    Current macs can't be configued to run Mercury Playback hardware acceleration unless you spend a bank on a Mac Pro and a Nvidia Quadro GPU that will alone cost nearly as much as a properly configured PC.

     

    Macs can work with CS5.5, but it is not the best option getting started.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2011 1:31 PM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Maribeth,

     

    The problem with your situation is that none of the pre-builts from the big companies are suitable for video editing (at least not without having to either spend an exhorbitant amount of money or feel comfortable opening up the computer case and manually adding the parts all by yourself).

     

    Why? Because although their base configurations are attractively priced, these companies will steal you blind when it comes to upgrading such a system with even the minimum number of components that Adobe requires just to even run Premiere Pro CS-anything satisfactorily. You see, Adobe requires a minumum of two fast, internal hard drives (three or more are even better), and that only Nvidia GPUs with 1GB or more RAM can run CS5.x with MPE GPU acceleration at all.

     

    Unfortunately, Apple does not currently offer any system at all whatsoever with an Nvidia GPU (that company's systems offer either integrated Intel HD graphics or AMD/ATi discrete GPUs).. And even more restrictive, the only Macs capable of using MPE GPU acceleration at all are the full-tower and super-expensive Mac Pros (of which the currently available models are mere carryovers from 2010, with no new CPUs or GPUs offered); that's because anything less than a Mac Pro are all self-contained and not user-upgradable at all except for the RAM. Furthermore, the only current-generation Nvidia desktop or workstation GPU that's compatible with Macs is the $800~$900 Quadro 4000.

     

    As for the other brands like Sony and HP, the cases that their systems are housed in are way less than optimal for an editing rig: They are seriously cramped and provide extremely poor (extremely low) airflow. Plus, they often cannot accommodate long graphics cards at all or more than two disks.

     

    So, in other words, don't go to any of those big-name companies for a custom PC build or a pre-built: They either charge you an exhorbitantly high price for even a minimally adequate configuration for editing or they do not offer such a robust required configuration at all. Instead, go to a smaller custom builder such as ADK who knows how to custom-configure a PC that's suitable for some heavy-duty video editing (these editing-specific companies charge a couple of hundred dollars more than an assemble-it-yourself PC made up of those exact same components).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 21, 2011 12:45 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    I agree with RjL190365.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 12, 2012 3:32 PM   in reply to Maribeth R

    Maribeth R wrote:

     

    I got a quote from ADK and I have asked a few peeps their opinion and they think it's a bit high.

     

     

    Remember that you are not paying just for the hardware. Of course it would be cheaper to build it yourself.


    You are paying for their knowledge and ability to asssemble a system which is properly set up and will work efficiently and be stable.

     

    I'm a satisfied customer.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points