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which version of html and css should I learn

Nov 22, 2011 7:02 AM

I want to learn html and css.  I google and asked the question of which I should learn first.  Most of the responses said it doesn't make much difference.  I did get several different answers as to what version of those I should learn.  I'm a beginner so what forms of html and css should I learn to get a better handle on DW.

 

thanks

Mike

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 22, 2011 7:06 AM   in reply to squatch97401

    You should learn the version that is currently embraced by the W3C as a Standard.  That would be HTML 4.01, and CSS2.  Knowing those will position you well for a segue into HTML5 and CSS3 (neither of which are so different than what you have learned already), as soon as they become the standard.

     

    You can get a great deal of information from the http://www.w3schools.com site about these.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 7:43 AM   in reply to squatch97401

    Hours?  Depending on how well you intend to learn this stuff, you would need weeks, not hours.  That's not because it's hard, there's just alot to plow through, and you will need lots of hands on experimentation.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 8:05 AM   in reply to MurraySummers

    Murray *ACP* wrote:

     

    Hours?  Depending on how well you intend to learn this stuff, you would need weeks, not hours.  That's not because it's hard, there's just alot to plow through, and you will need lots of hands on experimentation.

    I've been at this for eight years, and I'm STILL learning things every week.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 8:05 AM   in reply to squatch97401

    It really depends on how thoroughly you do the tutorials (yes, that's what I meant).

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 1:13 PM   in reply to Curtis_E_Flush

     

     

    I've been at this for eight years, and I'm STILL learning things every week.

     

     

     

     

     

    You must be a very slow learner then?  Could it be because you are not serious to put your mind into it and get on with it?

     

    Moderator note: Please keep the discussion on topic.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 9:31 AM   in reply to mytaxsite.co.uk

    Could it be because you are not serious to put your mind into it and get on with it?

     

    If you're serious about web design and getting on with it, you have no option but to learn something new daily.

     

    It's part and parcel of web design.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 12:58 PM   in reply to squatch97401

    Really, what you need to do is to understand what the rules adopted by the W3C are (once you understand how to work with code) and why. I am beginning to learn why presently, and I have been building websites for several years. And I really didn't start understanding why until I started reading up on the new, as yet unadopted HTML5 standard.

     

    As for learning stuff, my next work will be in php and JavaScript. I dove into php for a while there and then started getting really busy with work. I know enough JavaScript to get myself into serious trouble and that is something I shall certainly need to understand better as we get away from Flash and move towards the HTML5 and JavaScript alternatives to Flash.

     

    One thing I would mention is that if you declare a proper HTML format in Dreamweaver, you get a lot of help in proper code by the application. So if you tell Dreamweaver to set up a website in HTML4, It will make a header that complies with that standard.

     

    Most of my websites are in XHTML and, as I do more with HTML5, I shall carry a lot of those code practices from what I do with those websites. This means stuff like I don't capitalize my tags and some of my tags self-close. XHTML (which stands for eXtended Hypertext Markup Language) was never really adopted by the W3C as a full-on standard, but it does make good websites that tend to show up very well in most browsers.

     

    But as you are learning remember to occasionally ask, "Why?" Get enough code under your belt and you'll begin to suspect the answers and that will cause you to be better at making good websites.

     
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    Nov 22, 2011 1:13 PM   in reply to squatch97401

    I just started at the end of August and have found that it requires a lot of determination. The course that I am following has time guides and I always fall behind them, but I find that you need to do a lot of practise with assignments to learn each bit thoroughly. You shouldn't expect to learn everything in a couple of months! It is best to take it easy and make sure you understand each bit properly. It is well worth it though - GOOD LUCK!

     

    Keep in touch with you once you start learning, any questions just SHOUT!

     

    Have fun

     

    Dan

     
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