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Lightroom, Bridge, Camera Raw and inDesign

Jan 8, 2012 10:17 AM

After editing a DNG image in LR3.6, if I look at the image in Bridge CS4 the brightness seems off. If I use Bridge to open the image in Camera Raw 5.7 the Brightness and Contrast sliders do not match settings in LR.

 

In LR, if I select "Edit in" Adobe Photoshop CS4, a pop-up advises upgrading to CR 6.6 by going to Adobe Photoshop Help. When I do that, PS advises that no updates are available. Is this issue related to PS version that I am using?

 

Ultimate aim is to import into an inDesign document, but I need to change color space to CMYK, and to resize the image to fit into my inDesign end-product. Appears to me that, rather than exporting from LR, "Edit in" will first need to come into play to complete the development.

 

Any comments appreciated

Branched to a new discussion.
 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 8, 2012 10:42 AM   in reply to Jack Cane

    John,

     

    The message you're getting is saying that the version of Camera Raw in your PS CS4 won't understand everything that Lightroom has done to the images. Yes, you're right that you can't update CR to a high-enough version unless you have PS CS5.

     

    If you say render a copy with Lightroom changes (or whatever the exact wording is), LR will create a TIFF file with all the modifications you made baked in and pass that to Photoshop. It's probably what you want to have happen.

     

    Hal

     
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    Jan 8, 2012 12:32 PM   in reply to Jack Cane

    Lightroom causes many people to adjust their workflow, and in this case (and in most cases), I think that's the right thing for you to do.

     

    My workflow is pretty darn simple, and sounds very much like what you are headed towards. Photos are placed in a folder upon import and never moved again (exception: when I need to move the photos to a new hard drive). Keywords and other metadata are assigned either in the Import dialog box, or immediately thereafter using the Lightroom Library Module. I never search my folders for photos, I used keywords and other metadata for searching. In fact, I have no clue what folder a particular photos lives in, because I let Lightroom do the hard work of remembering.

     
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    Jan 8, 2012 12:32 PM   in reply to Jack Cane

    John,

     

    You're pretty darn close.

     

    If you keep your masters in Lightroom, you can always find them using keywords or other search criteria, no matter what folders they are in. In my case, I just import into date-based folders and rely on keywording to find what I need. Using folders as a means to categorize your images tends to get unwieldy pretty quickly. What happens when a picture falls into more than one category? If you always go through LR to find the images you're interested in, you'll have no trouble.

     

    There's no need to export from Lightroom until you actually have a use for an image. Export it to where it needs to be for your purpose, use it for that purpose (email, print, burn to dvd), and then delete the exported copy, secure in the ability to re-create it if you have another use for it.

     

    Hal

     
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    Jan 8, 2012 1:26 PM   in reply to Jack Cane

    But, having grown up with folder structures, I'm scared to death of having thousands of images in just one folder.

    No one is recommending putting all photos in one folder.

    Then there is the naming process. Errors need correcting. Again, as I write this, it could conceivably be neater to do it only in metadata (which I do anyway) rather than physically moving the image files. I'm still thinking about that. I could easily conclude that the LR catalog just gets in the way of my moving, evolving folder structure. It's a new way of thinking about content, for sure.

    In my opinion, the LR catalog doesn't get in the way of any organizing that you do, it facilitates and improves organizing. There is nothing that happens in LR that can't be changed at a later date. But, as both Hal and I have implied, your ever evolving folder structure is irrelevant; your organizing is done via keywords and other metadata. Folder structure should evolve only in the sense that you add new date-based folders when you take new pictures; and have your keywords evolve to represent the ever-evolving content of your photos.

     
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