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What PC to build? An update...

Jan 11, 2012 6:37 AM

Tags: #cs5.5 #pc #system #build #components #budget

What PC to build, updated January 2012


A question often asked is what system to build for NLE.


The previous article about this topic dates back to March 2010, so it was due an update because there were so many new developments in the past two years, including CS5.5

 

Basically you can think along three roads, a budget PC, an economical PC and the warrior PC. Notice that MAC is not mentioned here. There are three reasons for that, one is I'm not qualified to really advise on MAC's, two is that they are way overpriced and three they are severely limited in component choices. So this is all about PC.

 

Whether you want to have a budget, economical or warrior PC, there are a number of common components that you will always need, a case, a PSU, CPU cooler, monitor, keyboard, mouse, DVD/BR burner and stuff like that so I'm not going into those components, with the exception of case, PSU and CPU cooler.

 

CASE:

While the case of your choice is often determined by looks and what appeals to you (or your CFO, the wife), I want to stress that for all categories, budget, economical or warrior, it is better to use a BIG tower, instead of a mid tower.

 

Why, you may wonder. Actually there are a lot of reasons. Mid towers can limit your choices in CPU coolers, because the case is not wide enough to install certain CPU coolers. The height of the cooler does not fit in the case. They can limit your choice of video card, because these have grown in length significantly and mid towers often do not allow the installation of certain video cards due to the limited depth or prevent you from installing hard disks in certain slots. Mid towers will limit your expansion capabilities (less drive cages), make installation of components more difficult, have limited cable management features, have limited airflow and tend to become hotter than big towers and thus more noisy (the fans need to run at higher speed) and limit overclockabilty.

 

A BIG tower is the (only) way to go.


PSU:

The PSU is one of the most crucial components in any system but also the one component most often overlooked. A good PSU will give you years of reliable work on your PC, a suboptimal or mediocre PSU will give you tremendous headaches and unexplainable crashes, hangs or errors, causing you to miss deadlines.

 

Go to eXtreme Power Supply Calculator Pro v2.5 and get the Pro version. Enter all your components, including planned expansions, set the Motherboard to High End - Desktop, set the CPU Utilization (TDP) to 100%, set System Load to 100% and Capacitor Aging to 30% and press the Calculate button. Add 10 - 15% to this Wattage for safety and note the required amperage on the various rails (+3.3V, +5V and +12V). Based on these figures, select a good GOLD label PSU, that meets the total wattage and the amperage on each rail. It is your best guarantee for long and reliable, troublefree editing.

 

Budget, economical or warrior system


Before going into these three systems, you can consider them to be a rough 'Best-buying Guide', let me remind you of the basic practical system requirements for CS5.5 and consider your own workflow to interpret these charts.

It starts with the codec:

 

Codec.png

 

Since DSLR is getting so popular, let me remind you that this is ranked under the 'Difficult' codecs and P2 is an 'Easy' codec. The more difficult the codec you use, the higher the system requirements. See:

 

System requirements CS5.png

For the full article, see Adobe Forums: System requirements for CS5

 

As a rough translation from 'Easy', 'Intermediate' and 'Difficult' to the kind of system you want to build, you could say that 'Easy' can be handled quite well with a 'Budget' system, 'Intermediate' is best handled by an 'Economical' or better system and 'Difficult' requires an 'Economical' or better system. A 'Budget' system may struggle with the load of such 'Difficult' codecs.

 

Note that in the following table, I have mentioned components in each category. These are just examples of what could fit in each category, they are not necessarily a combination of components that I would build per se.

Also note that I have not chosen the fastest CPU in each category, but only unlocked CPU's. Each can be overclocked for optimal results and then will deliver a better Bang-For-The-Buck (BFTB) than the highest clocked CPU in that range. Finally, note that the budget system can benefit from increasing memory to 4 x 4 GB for only € 38 extra. That is the weakest link in the budget system.

 

Prices mentioned are current day prices in the Netherlands (01-11-2012) including 19% VAT.

 

Here are my suggestions:

 

What PC to build.png

The main difference in comparison to the previous guide, is that the i7-3930K appears to be faster and better affordable than a dual Xeon X5680 system.

 

Anyway, I hope this helps people comtemplating a new system to get the right components in an affordable system.

 
Replies 1 2 3 ... 6 Previous Next
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 6:42 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Nice Job Harm!

     

    Scott

    ADK

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 7:50 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Nice job on the chart, Harm! However, some of the "easy" codecs are nowhere near as easy as the chart seems to indicate simply because some of those codecs actually require massive disk performance and size just to be handled properly. And DV and HDV is "easy" only because of their lower resolution and moderate-to-high compression (these codecs are limited to 25 Mbps total). Less-compressed codecs (even at extremely low resolutions) require much, much more disk space - and thus, much, much higher disk I/O system performance.

     

    And "difficult" codecs are "difficult" due to the CPU horsepower that's often required of them. And AVCHD not only requires a relatively robust CPU to handle properly, but also require somewhat faster than "standard" disk performance due to the fact that most NLEs decompress and recompress video on the fly. (For Premiere Pro CS5.x, 4:2:0 AVCHD video gets decompressed to uncompressed 4:2:2 during the editing stage, and then gets recompressed into the desired output format during encoding. Some other NLEs are natively 4:4:4 RGB - and all material gets converted to 4:4:4 RGB in those NLEs and then to the desired output format on the fly.)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 8:47 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Great article. Could it be true - Harm, ADK and Videoguys are now all on the same page! Intel 3930K as the way to go for the best perfomance.

     

    Those interested can check out our latest DIY9 sneak peak machine based on the new Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge-E 3930K running on Asus P9X79

     

    Gary

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 8:56 AM   in reply to Videoguys

    So it would seem…

     

    Still selling a good amount of 2600ks however

     

    The X79 has not been without its own set of issues and honestly its been the hardest product launch to date

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 9:06 AM   in reply to Scott Chichelli

    Our customers are finding the 2600Ks are an excellent choice for budget systems.

     

    What kind of stuff are you running into with the X79s? Anything you can share here?

     

    Gary

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 9:33 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    HI Harm,

     

    Way off…

     

     

     

    Budget 3% still usually 2600 no OC with no raids just 3 drives

     

    Economy 30% these are a lot of weekend warriors or hobbyist with money (2600k with 5 drives) mostly OCed

     

    Warrior 30%  (X79 platform 5 drives)

     

    Warrior  35%         (X79 platform with parity raids)

     

    Absurd 2%  (Dual Xeon 2 x 8 drive raids)

     

     

     

    Scott

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 9:39 AM   in reply to Videoguys

    A lot of heat issues not just the CPU but memory, memory controller etc,etc

     

    We build very quiet systems

     

    A lot of crap bios from manufacturers, compatibility issues with Raid Cards, Capture cards, Pro Audio interfaces heck even eSata cards and firewire cards

     

    Un stable over clocks on some boards.

     

     

     

    Trying to not reveal what boards we are using but frankly we were left with having to use the very least fav manufacturer.

     

    And I am very afraid of Quality control from them… this go round seems much better than previous experience (numerous bad ones) so far we will see

     

    Hoping my fav manufacturer will get their act together…

     

     

     

    We try to use just one board for each platform for both Pro Audio and Pro video…

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 11:27 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    As usual, great job Harm, thanks!

     

    Two suggested tweaks for your "Warrior" build list:

    1) The motherboard that you spec'd, Gigabyte's GA-X79-UD7, only has 4 RAM slots and will not take the 8x8GB sticks you listed; note that Gigabyte's "lesser" UD5 board however does indeed have 8 RAM slots

    2) Suggest ARC-1882 series controller cards; I'm not sure what all has improved, but it definitely has a better looking cooler than the 2 different styles of 1880ix heat sinks that Areca put out (1st had 2 small passive heat sinks and did not cool very well, 2nd had a large heat sink and cooled better). Neither is as effective for a workstation case as the old 1680ix design like I think that you use currently, which has 1 small passive heat sink + a 2nd fan cooled heat sink.

     

    Jim

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 12:34 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    I do not know if I can stand this boring peace on all fronts.

     

    Great job Harm!

     

    I wonder how long this disk drive market is going to take to get back to normality, or is this the price we are going to have to pay for so few venders left actually making disk drives.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 1:32 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    [Message deleted by forum host - commercial advertising is not permitted]

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 12:42 PM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    really?

     

    first stinking post and you come in here Spamming the forums

     

    no class man!

     

    scott

    ADK

     

    PS do you see any links in my sig? nope as thats called trolling..

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 12:43 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Hey Bill,

    depending on who i talk with 6-12 months...

     

    Scott

    ADK

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 12:44 PM   in reply to Scott Chichelli

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 11, 2012 2:56 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Hello Harm,

     

    Thank you very much for this great information!

     

    I've been planning my next DIY computer for several months now and my first battle was finding information from someone I could trust, and that delivered information in a clear, logical, and unbiased standpoint.

     

    Gary from VideoGuys has been a real inspiration and I rush to my PC every morning and check for DIY9 blog updates,  already started buying parts!  As the DIY9 system is  linked to a modest budget,  I need to now weigh up whether to tweak it upward$ to a (let's say) "DIY9 UNLEASHED" - full tower, water cooling etc, or stick to the exact components recommended.  The information you've provided is very valuable and makes great sense - thank you again.

     

    Thomas - thank you also for the link to the Tsunami system - very interesting!  Thank you for sharing information and component choices.

     

    Once I learnt to ignore a certain other long time contributor who comes across with a real combatitive attitude, and who is very "secret squirrel" about internal component choices,  it became much clearer who to listen to.

     

    Knowledge will set you free!  Keep up the good work guys!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 8:52 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    I second that motion!! As Teddy Roosevelt would say, " BULLY for Harm!!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:06 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    I agree, Harm. Here's why:

     

    1) The cheapest option, the GTX 580, is also the best option for CS5.5 performance. Premiere Pro does not take full advantage of the Quadros, and that the Adobe apps actually perform slower with any of the three Quadros offered than with the GTX 580 simply due to the inferior hardware specs of the Quadros (in fact, the Quadro 6000 is actually based on the older GTX 470 with a 384-bit GDDR5 RAM bus instead of the 320-bit bus the actual GTX 470 used). The Quadro 4000 suggested by that shop is actually the slowest GPU out of all of those, based on performance in CS5.5. Note that despite my rant, the Quadros do make sense if you frequently run applications that either make good use of the Quadro's capabilities or absolutely require a Quadro just to even run at all.

     

    2) That vendor does not offer even an aid0 array, let alone a RAID, for any of its Tsunami systems even at extra cost. The only disks offered at all are all single, non-RAID disks.

     

    3) The Thermaltake Armor A60 case offered is not good enough for a serious editing system: It can barely fit a GTX 580 inside. Worse, its air circulation inside is poorer than even an Antec Nine Hundred, let alone the Cooler Master HAF series cases, due to its single front 120mm intake fan and the arrangement of its hard drives (the sideways-mounted hard drives result in the hard drive mounting bracket almost completely obstructing intake airflow, leaving only a single 120mm side-panel-mounted fan to provide intake airflow to the rest of the case).

     

    4) The power supply is not specified at all. It could have been a poor-quality unit that could barely handle even half of its claimed wattage.

     

    And all that costs more money than their constituent components are worth, even though there is a cost premium for assembly and testing.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:07 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    In response:

     

    1) The Quadro 4000 is just the default selection.  We also offer the GTX 580.

     

    2) Our video drives are always in a RAID array

     

    3) The A60 is a standard ATX case.  It fits all display cards just fine. There are also 5 silent fans in the system so cooling is NOT an issue.

     

    4)  We use Thermaltake Toughpower Grand power supplies.

     

    Glad to clear that up!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:13 AM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    Thanks for clearing that up. It means that a 2TB "internal video drive" is actually made up of 2 x 1TB 7200 RPM drives in RAID 0 (called "aid0" by some people).

     

    And the Thermaltake Grand PSUs your Tsunami systems always use are good, but I can find better-quality 80-Plus Gold units in the same price range.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:17 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    To each his own, I respect and appreciate your opinion.  We have done extensive testing and stand by all the components we use in our custom workstation builds.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:20 AM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    I also respect your opinion. In fact, a Quadro also makes sense if one wants to "graduate" from Premiere to higher-level Avid programs (which always prefer Quadros).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:24 AM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    Some folks like to DIY, but we find that many of our DIY readers really want to find someone who can build a machine for them, they just need to understadn what specs they need. So our DIY guide becomes teh starting point for their system shopping. Which is why we updated our recommended turnkey NLE workstation dealers page:

     

    Get a turnkey NLE solution from an expert NLE integrator. You can follow this link to a list of turnkey providers recommended by the Videoguys. All of the companies featured on this page make excellent NLE workstations, fully loaded and optimized for long format video editing.

     

    Both ADk and Safe Harbor are on the list. One of the advantages of a turnkey over a DIY is that the resellers we recommend take the time to test and tweak their systems. Many times they have relationships with Intel or the motherboard vendors that gets them advanced looks and even access to system design support teams.

     

    I'd like to thank Harm for this thread, his research and the time he puts in onthese forums. He is a great asset for the Adobe community.

     

    Gary

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:27 AM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    “””We have done extensive testing ’’’” really? Got benchmarks on your website?

     

    If not care to post your findings?

     

    Since you have done extensive testing I am sure you have

     

    Something like this

     

    I realize our testing isn’t very extensive so please enlighten us

     

    Sorry couldn’t resist…

     

    Scott

     

    ADK

     

     

     

    Premiere Pro CS5 Version 5.5 Testing

     

    Mac Pro 2010 Dual 2.93GHz

     

    24GB 1600 CL 9

     

    Quadro 4000

     

    2 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in Raid 0

     

    Video material - AVCHD 1080P 24 Frame Each Cut to 30 minutes of material

     

    Export Codec - H264 HDTV 1080P 24 Preset Default

     

    4 Effects per Layer - Fast Color Corrector, Brightness & Contrast, Video Limiter, Sharpen

     

    Each Layer Scaled to 50% for 4 frame PinP view.

     

    3 Layer - 42:24

     

    4 Layer - 44:05

     

     

     

    I7 990X 3.4 GHz

     

    24GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    580GTX

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    Video material - AVCHD 1080P 24 Frame Each Cut to 30 minutes of material

     

    Export Codec - H264 HDTV 1080P 24 Preset Default

     

    4 Effects per Layer - Fast Color Corrector, Brightness & Contrast, Video Limiter, Sharpen

     

    Each Layer Scaled to 50% for 4 frame PinP view.

     

    3 Layer - 35:55

     

    4 Layer - 39:02

     

     

     

    I7 990X 4.0 GHz

     

    24GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    580GTX

     

    3 Layer - 32:06

     

    4 Layer - 34:45

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    3 Layer - 30:46

     

    4 Layer - 33:36

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    8 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in Raid 5 array with RS2BL080 controller

     

    3 Layer - 29:33

     

    4 Layer - 33:26

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz Z68

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    2 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives Raid 0 and 80GB SSD Cache Drive

     

    Quick Sync

     

    3 Layer - 13:36

     

    4 Layer - 17:20

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz Z68

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    2 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives Raid 0 and 80GB SSD Cache Drive

     

    3 Layer - 31:16

     

    4 Layer - 35:08

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz Z68

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    2 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives Raid 1 and 80GB SSD Cache Drive

     

    Quick Sync

     

    3 Layer - 13:51

     

    4 Layer - 17:50

     

     

     

    I7 2600K 4.7 GHz Z68

     

    16GB Blackline 1600 CL 9

     

    570GTX

     

    2 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives Raid 1 and 80GB SSD Cache Drive

     

    3 Layer - 32:09

     

    4 Layer - 36:47

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 3.9 GHz

     

    16GB  1333

     

    570GTX

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    3 Layer - 31:47

     

    4 Layer - 34:14

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 4.5 GHz

     

    16GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    3 Layer - 29:08

     

    4 Layer - 31.01

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 4.5 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    3 Layer - 27:55

     

    4 Layer - 30:04

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 4.7 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    4 Layer - 29:05

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 4.7 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    Lightning effect on all 4 layers

     

    4 Layer - 1:35:17

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 3.9 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4 WD 1Tb Sata 64 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.1

     

    Lightning effect on all 4 layers

     

    4 Layer - 1:52:36

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 3.8 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4  1Tb Sata 32 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.2

     

    3 Layer - 32:15

     

    4 Layer - 35:19

     

     

     

    X79 3.3 @ 4.5 GHz

     

    32GB  1333

     

    580GTX 3GB

     

    4  1Tb Sata 32 Meg Cache 600 Drives in 2 Raid 0 arrays

     

    CS5.5.2

     

    3 Layer - 27:43

     

    4 Layer - 30:02

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:27 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    You sound like you know your stuff,  however it's very confusing to the average punter like me to build a nice editing system with such conflicting information.  You have given the impression above that the Quadro 4000 is an inferior card for editing with CS5.5 - however it is currently the top card recommended by Gary @ Videoguys.  And that for some bizarre reason an 80-Plus Gold PSU is going to make a better machine than having a Thermaltake PSU??

     

    Technology is evolving at such a fast rate these days,  but the launch of the newest and fastest does not make current technology instantly inferior.

     

    I would suggest that you are technically correct, but living too much in a benchmarking world.  In a real world,  isn't it more helpful to say that "both the Quadro 4000 and GTX580 are very powerful nVidia cards and either would make a great choice for CS5.5 editing."

     

    If I'm currently using a Quadro 4000,  and then "upgrade" to a GTX580,  would it (a) totally change my life and revolutionise my business,  or  (b) shave a couple of micro-seconds off a render which I'd probably wouldn't even notice?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:36 AM   in reply to Dr Jared

    The Quadro 4000 is over hyped and over priced as well as underperforming.

     

    Unless you are using Solidworks or 1-2 other 3d Animation programs any Quadro is pointless.

     

    Its based on a GTX 460

     

     

     

    So basically there “DOC”  you over paid for an underperforming video card.. but hey what do I know…

     

    A 560 would do better.

     

     

     

    Scott

     

    ADK

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:41 AM   in reply to Dr Jared

    Dr Jared wrote:


      You have given the impression above that the Quadro 4000 is an inferior card for editing with CS5.5 - however it is currently the top card recommended by Gary @ Videoguys. 

     

    Could that be because Video Guys happens to only sell Quadro cards, one of their few computer components?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:42 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Are you suggesting I sell my current Quadro 4000 card - which as far as I can tell is working like a rocket,  and spend $$$ on a GTX560 or GTX580?  I do basic long-form editing with HD1080 footage.  Would it knock my socks off, or would I hardly notice the difference?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 11:59 AM   in reply to Dr Jared

    Actually, Dr. Jared, the Thermaltake Toughpower Grand PSU is 80-Plus Gold certified. The difference is the platforms that the various 80-Plus Gold certified PSUs are based on. The Toughpower Grand is based on a premium CWT (Channel Well Tech)-manufactured platform.

     

    Thermaltake's poor professional reputation for its PSUs can be attributed to the TR2 and TR2 RX series PSUs: Most if not all of those cannot handle anywhere close to their labeled wattage ratings without their DC output quality going out of the ATX spec. For example, the TR2 RX "850W" model can only provide up to about 550W under realistic internal operating temperatures.

     

    And yes, Dr. Jared, the Quadro 4000 is weaker than a GTX 460 SE: The Quadro 4000 has only 256 CUDA cores versus 288 CUDA cores in the GTX 460 SE. By contrast, the plain GTX 560 has 336 CUDA cores, while the GTX 570 and 580 have 480 and 512 CUDA cores, respectively.

     

    And yes, Quadro 4000s sell used for more money than the full retail cost of a brand-new GTX 580. So, you actually earn some money just selling the Quadro 4000 and buying a GTX 580.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 12:44 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Would it knock my socks off, or would I hardly notice the difference?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 12:51 PM   in reply to RjL190365

    We have been recommedning the GTX470 and now the 570/580 for Adobe CS5.x as the best value and performance for the Mercury Engine. I posted the hacks on our website to enable the broader CUDA cards to work when Adobe only had Quadro cards and the GTX460 listed.

     

    We recommend the Quadro cards based on our need to support Avid (they only certify Quadro cards) and the added "stability" they offer.  Quadro cards have a longer life cycle, and the drivers don't change as often as the gamer cards. So while they aren't always the hottest or fastest cards, you know what your getting and you know they work. We run into customers with stability and crashing issues all the time. Many times it is the GPU that is the culprit. Our go to tech solutions is to get thema  Quadro card. Why? Because it works and it leaves our customers happy.

     

    Dennis Radeke of Adobe posted a very good article on his blog:

    Diving into NVIDIA GPU’s and what they mean for Premiere Pro

     

    Very good reading.

     

    Gary

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2012 1:01 PM   in reply to Videoguys

    HI Gary,

     

     

     

    Well you knew this was coming…

     

     

     

    1)      I have NEVER had issues with Avid and a GTX card. Now since Avid cant seem to update as well as Adobe

     

    They do have this little nag screen that pops up (pretty sure its gone in 6 however) about “this card is not supported”.

     

    Click it to go bye bye and end of story.

     

     

     

    2)      Avid support well that’s the joke of the day isn’t is? Unless you buy Avid assurance ($1000 per yr) there is no support.

     

    3)      Since my support team is better than 95% of the guys you get on the phone with Avid well obviously we sell the Assurance

     

    Moot point for us..

     

    4)      More stable in Avid? Come on man….

     

     

     

    The whole Quadro card thing is marketing and nVidia strong arming the software vendors by holding Cuda code support over their heads unless they promote

     

    The Quadro cards as being something they are not. (lets not forget the free video cards either)

     

    Since I have been outspoken against Quadros I no longer get any “demo” Quadros hmmm I wonder why?

     

     

     

    Scott

     

    ADK

     
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    Jan 12, 2012 1:05 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Hi Harm - sorry, I was using the 'reply to original post' button - didn't see the 'reply' one.

     

    Comments were not directed at you but at Scott.  I was trying to get his commitment to my that selling my Quadro4000 and replacing it with a GTX580 would be of noticable REAL WORLD benefit, or if he's just arguing theoretical benchmark schemantics.

     

    Personally I think when the GTX590-Ti-Pro-Ferma3-hyper  is released,  he'll be telling me the GTX580 is a waste of time and only losers use them.

     

    I've made my decision.

     
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    Jan 12, 2012 1:07 PM   in reply to Dr Jared

     
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    Jan 12, 2012 1:15 PM   in reply to SafeHarborTJ

    still waiting on those benchmarks... TJ dont get too smug..

     
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    Jan 12, 2012 1:15 PM   in reply to Scott Chichelli

    Scott,

     

    I'm not going to fight with you. For some reason you just can't seem to understand the fact that you are an "EXPERT" integrator, and our DIY articles are for everyone else. Even after I recommend folks buy integrated systems from you ;-)

     

    Bad mouthing Avid support has nothing to do with this discussion or your points. I don't know why you feel you must go there. You don't have to always rip other companies and vendors to show off how good you are. Let your systems  do that for you.

     

    I get calls and emails from end users everyday. We offer free tech support for everything we sell, plus folks just come to us for advice. Replacing the graphics card with a Quadro card solves so many stability problems for so many customers. 

     

    As I said - we recommend the GTX570/580 as the go to solution for Adobe. You are entitled to your opionion about Quadro cards. I'm not saying you are wrong, just that one size does not always fit all.

     

    Please please please try to keep this thread thoughtful and positive. Harm did a great job - lets not derail this thread.

     

    Gary

     
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