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OH, I REALLY, REALLY MISS GOLIVE!

Aug 28, 2008 8:59 PM

  Latest reply: STURMKATZE, Jan 15, 2012 11:39 AM
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2012 10:20 AM   in reply to STURMKATZE

    Sturmkatze: I hear you and I sympathise -

     

    Just FYI: WordPress started out as a blogging-only platform but it has advanced dramatically and you can now make "regular" websites with it. Indeed, all of mine have been built for businesses and they aren't blogs, though a couple of them include blogs. In WP you can create both "pages" and "posts". The homepage can be set to a "static page" versus the blog page, etc. Posts are for blog or blog-like entries and pages can be used just like pages built in GoLive. The difference is that the pages are dynamic. They can also include multiple "sidebars" that allow for placement of all kinds of plugins (such as calendars, twitter feeds, facebook links, scrolling announcements, videos, audio, photo albums and on and on. All kinds of things that I used to have to search out and adapt for GoLive (and sometimes pay a programmer to configure, install..).

     

    Because the pages are built from templates (header, footer, sidebar, main content, and endless variations) you can make global changes in certain things very quickly. For instance, changing a phone number in a header or footer - you change it once, save it, and it changes on all the site pages, and so on.

     

    OTOH, WordPress, in it's own way, has the same issues illustrated by the "WYSIWYG" versus "Coding" discussion we're sort of having here. WordPress spans the gamut. It offers the ability to create a "functional" website within minutes to people who literally have no web design/web development skills whatsoever. However, those sites of course then limit people to whatever the template looks like out of the box, etc. The templates typically build in a certain amount of customization ability - you can place your own logo at the top and change background tiles and homepage images and change text colors, etc. A good designer can do a lot within those parameters but the average person usually doesn't. But otherwise you have to work within the design as established.

     

    On the other end, you can build dynamic sites from scratch within WordPress, using whatever design you create, which is what I do. But you have to learn how to do it.

     

    You can download all kinds of plugins to all kinds of things, but you find out that some are quite simple to implement and others require some level of programming knowledge to use or to customize. There's lots of support forums and you'll see a lot of cries for help from people who don't know anything about HTML, CSS, PHP, JQuery etc. that are trying to do things they don't have the knowledge to do.

     

    WordPress markets itself as (among other things) a solution for people with no related skills, just as do various WYSIWYG applications. The eventual problem for a lot of people is that they desire outcomes they don't have the skill to implement themselves. So they either have to live within their limitations; they have to pay others to do things they can't do, or they have advance their skill set.

     

    One last thing - the world isn't filled solely with "designers" and "coders". A lot of people span both categories and a lot of very fine-looking, well-functioning sites have been built by people who can do both.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2012 10:21 AM   in reply to STURMKATZE

    Sturmkatze: I hear you and I sympathise -

     

    Just FYI: WordPress started out as a blogging-only platform but it has advanced dramatically and you can now make "regular" websites with it. Indeed, all of mine have been built for businesses and they aren't blogs, though a couple of them include blogs. In WP you can create both "pages" and "posts". The homepage can be set to a "static page" versus the blog page, etc. Posts are for blog or blog-like entries and pages can be used just like pages built in GoLive. The difference is that the pages are dynamic. They can also include multiple "sidebars" that allow for placement of all kinds of plugins (such as calendars, twitter feeds, facebook links, scrolling announcements, videos, audio, photo albums and on and on. All kinds of things that I used to have to search out and adapt for GoLive (and sometimes pay a programmer to configure, install..). 

     

    Because the pages are built from templates (header, footer, sidebar, main content, and endless variations) you can make global changes in certain things very quickly. For instance, changing a phone number in a header or footer - you change it once, save it, and it changes on all the site pages, and so on. 

     

    OTOH, WordPress, in it's own way, has the same issues illustrated by the "WYSIWYG" versus "Coding" debate we're sort of having here. WordPress spans the gamut. It offers the ability to create a "functional" website within minutes to people who literally have no web design/web development skills whatsoever. However, those sites of course then limit people to whatever the template looks like out of the box, etc. The templates typically build in a certain amount of customization ability - you can place your own logo at the top and change background tiles and homepage images and change text colors, etc. A good designer can do a lot within those parameters but the average person usually doesn't. But otherwise you have to work within the design as established.

     

    On the other end, you can build dynamic sites from scratch within WordPress, using whatever design you create. But you have to learn how to do it.

     

    You can download all kinds of plugins to all kinds of things, but you find out that some are quite simple to implement and others require some level of programming knowledge to use or to customize. There's lots of support forums and you'll see a lot of cries for help from people who don't know anything about HTML, CSS, PHP, JQuery etc. that are trying to do things they don't have the knowledge to do. 

     

    WordPress markets itself as (among other things) a solution for people with no related skills, just as do various WYSIWYG applications. The eventual problem for a lot of people is that they desire outcomes they don't have the skill to implement themselves. So they either have to live within their limitations; they have to pay others to do things they can't do, or they have advance their skill set. 

     

    One last thing - the world isn't filled solely with "designers" and "coders". A lot of people span both categories and a lot of very fine-looking, well-functioning sites have been built by people who can do both.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2012 11:39 AM   in reply to rudnosukas

    rudnosukas, I understand. Like I said, I have a coupleof WP sites and like it, way better than other blog stuff -- I just want a bit more control. I have not delved into making a theme for WP yet. Be nice if there was a simple tutorial that I can find for that. Still, while it has a lot of bennies, it also has some irritating limitations. I will say however, the updating is painless w/ it!!!! That is nice.

     
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