Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

More Info on CS6

Feb 12, 2012 2:50 PM

Tags: #photoshop #cs6

Full Article Here: http://psd.tutsplus.com/articles/news/more-new-features-for-photoshop/

 

Highlights:

 

1800 New Icons and 250 New Cursors

Crash Recovery

Content Aware Move. This new feature will allow you to make a selection and then move those pixels to another part of your image without having to use multiple layers.

Adaptive Wide Angle, a feature that will allow you to quickly correct for lens distortion.

 

I won't reprint the article for Copyright reasons why I provide link above.

 
Replies
  • Trevor Dennis
    5,905 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2012 3:09 PM   in reply to Lynda Spangler

    Unfortunately, still nothing of consequence.  Content Aware Move is more of a JDI (Just do It) feature as it is combining move and and Content Aware fill.  I'm betting we all worked out how to do that the first time we started using CAF.  Same with Adaptive wide angle.  AFAICT It's nothing we can't already do with the lens correction tool. 

     

    Thanks for sharing though.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2012 3:18 PM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    Wow. Those dots 'n' dashes sure are looking exciting!

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,488 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2012 3:51 PM   in reply to Lynda Spangler

    Leveraging the things Adobe knows how to do in different ways is nice.  If the entirety of Photoshop CS6 is cleanup, robustness enhancements, performance enhancements, and little things it will still be a nice upgrade to have.  Who doesn't like faster and more reliable software?

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Trevor Dennis
    5,905 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2012 5:06 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    Leveraging the things Adobe knows how to do in different ways is nice.  If the entirety of Photoshop CS6 is cleanup, robustness enhancements, performance enhancements, and little things it will still be a nice upgrade to have.  Who doesn't like faster and more reliable software?

     

    -Noel

    They wouldn't dare. On top of the stricter upgrade policy it would cause a huge back lash and disaffected user base. Blimey. Even I would have to think twice, and if I thought I was locked in because I'd have to pay full price for CS7 in two years time, I would not be happy!!!

     

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2012 11:27 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Who doesn't like faster and more reliable software?

     

    I'm sure we all do... Still,  fixing performance issues with the sheer force of GPU acceleration and luring people into a false sense of easiness with semi-smart/ semi-automatic features gives me an uneasy feeling about where this is all headed...

     

    Mylenium

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 2:07 AM   in reply to Lynda Spangler

    I'm in the happy position where my employer pays for all this, but I still need to justify the expense.

     

    With CS5 I had a really good case in ACR, I could even demonstrate with an actual print (exhibit A). But the party tricks, CAF and so on, just won't fly. I didn't even bother trying that angle.

     

    So I'm pinning my hopes on ACR one more time. Also, next month we're starting on a very exciting project using IR and UV, as well as the possibility of getting a digital back for a Mamiya 67 with some beautiful optics we have lying around. There may be something I can hold on to there.

     

    But bottom line: productivity, or the money's not there. Those are the rules.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Trevor Dennis
    5,905 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 2:21 AM   in reply to twenty_one

    I have said somewhere in one of these sneak peek threads, that JDI features are not to be scoffed at, because they save LOTS of time.  So features like CAF, and refine edge, ought to be a good selling point.  Especially if deadlines are important.  Refine edge has changed my whole approach to image making, because it is so quick and easy to make accurate complex selections, I don't think twice before taking them on.  So composites, and rearranging image elements with a view to improving composition, do not tie you up for long periods.

     

    D Fosse, have you tried the Lighroom beta 4 RAW conversion process?  I haven't, but have great things about it. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 3:08 AM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    Yes, you're absolutely right of course, the trouble is that I can't sell it upstairs...

     

    The Lightroom beta is on my list. I don't very much care for Lightroom itself, but it will show where ACR is headed.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,488 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 9:45 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    Mylenium wrote:

     

    luring people into a false sense of easiness with semi-smart/ semi-automatic features gives me an uneasy feeling about where this is all headed...

     

     

    We all have that feeling.  The computer industry is catering more and more to the masses, and less to the professional.  Even Adobe can't ignore than billions of people will want to edit images after a fashion on their little handheld devices, and we already see that Mac is increasing in popularity because it enables more non-technical people to just use it.

     

    My point, however, is this:  It's about damned time Adobe put some effort into finishing stuff that was left out of prior releases in their mad dashes to include more gee whiz features to spur sales.

     

    Hey Dag, if you really, really want Photoshop CS6, and your employer won't pony up the upgrade price, there is always the possibility that you could buy your own tools.  You're probably going to buy an upgrade for your copy at home, and we know you can install it on up to 2 systems...     In all seriousness, in other industries people are expected to bring their own tools to work.  Back when I worked for others I did it a few times.  When my boss actually SAW what I was telling him he usually then went ahead and approved the purchase for a work copy for me and others.  After a while he just started approving what I requested.

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 9:54 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    The computer industry is catering more and more to the masses, and less to the professional.

     

    I have no problem with catering to the "masses" as a commercial prospect nor as a way of giving more people access to specific tools as in making it more democratic. However, I'm concerned how it inevitably ends up more and more people not caring for the artsy/ artistic aspects of the trade. You know, every kid can do some weird stuff with Instagram on his smart phone, yet many of them can't draw a straight line or have the slightest clue about image composition. By introducing features like content aware move/ scale you only further this ignorance and that doesn't make me all that optimistic... If you will, some of this stuff will become to image processing what Comic Sans is to type design...

     

    Mylenium

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,488 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 9:57 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    I agree with you 110%.  I think that just says that we can't rest on our laurels, and have to grow and move on ourselves in order to continue to define the difference between "run of the mill" and "exceptional" work.

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 11:51 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    You know, every kid can do some weird stuff with Instagram on his smart phone, yet many of them can't draw a straight line or have the slightest clue about image composition.

     

    They can no longer read, write or do arithmetic, so I guess drawing straight lines crooked is not so unexpected.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 2:59 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    there is always the possibility that you could buy your own tools.

    Well, I do to some extent, just to keep things smoothly rolling. Expenses build up: cameras, lenses, a couple of studio flash units, computer hardware, not to mention a design premium suite...it adds up.

     

    I also have my own personal license, but haven't upgraded it after CS4 so it's just sitting there.

     

    But I'm not complaining. I feel very privileged as employed photographer. My take home pay is at least twice that of the freelancers I know, and it's regular. So if I have to haggle a bit now and then, that's OK with me.

     

    Just give me something substantial in the upgrade, that's all I ask

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Trevor Dennis
    5,905 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 8:43 PM   in reply to twenty_one

    D Fosse wrote:

     

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    there is always the possibility that you could buy your own tools.

    Well, I do to some extent, just to keep things smoothly rolling. Expenses build up: cameras, lenses, a couple of studio flash units, computer hardware, not to mention a design premium suite...it adds up.

     

    I also have my own personal license, but haven't upgraded it after CS4 so it's just sitting there.

     

    But I'm not complaining. I feel very privileged as employed photographer. My take home pay is at least twice that of the freelancers I know, and it's regular. So if I have to haggle a bit now and then, that's OK with me.

     

    Just give me something substantial in the upgrade, that's all I ask

     

    Sounds like you have landed a great job.  DPReview linked to this interview with the view that photojournalism is a dying trade.  Even people like Dave Hill have dry periods.  I listened to an interview with Dave Hill where he was speaking about the hero projects he did, and how it saved the business because he was not getting a whole lot of work.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 13, 2012 11:40 PM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    Indeed. So I want to hang on to it, and not rock the boat too much. This is an art museum, so it's a sheltered world. Actually I'm generating more income than I cost them, as we sell a lot of images to other institutions and publications, so I feel safe for the moment. But times are tough and you never know.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points