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Enver Pex
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Best way to stabilize several dozen clips in a Premiere sequence?

Feb 20, 2012 5:28 PM

The Warp Stabilizer feature in AE is nice in that it helps if you have one clip to stabilize.

 

However, I keep finding that I have dozens of clips to stabilize. Take an average home video tape, cut it up into clips, and you have yourself between 15 and 100 clips in Premiere. Most of them now need the following actions applied:

 

- Replace with AE composition

- Wait for AE to load

- Add Stabilize Motion effect

- Wait for the analysis to complete (can take 5 minutes to an hour)

- Save and close

 

Needless to say, doing this for 100 clips is very impractical. The worst part is waiting for analysis to complete: if I don't, then Premiere simply shows a blue band with "Click Analyze to begin stabilization" across the frame, but of course that button is in AE. Can I get Premiere to kick off these Analyses and leave it working overnight, or does it require my attention every time one clip is finished? If I just leave it alone and pick "Render entire work area", the blue band with the message is "burned in", instead of forcing AE to do the work.

 

Is there anything else that can be done to make this process less time-consuming? Doing everything in AE is not an option because the rest of the work is traditional editing of these clips. I'd love to script replacing each clip with an AE composition, and especially force the analysis phase in batch mode, but Premiere CS5.5 doesn't seem to support that.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 20, 2012 7:42 PM   in reply to Enver Pex

    Have yet to use AE for this and hoping that CS6 will incorporate it into Premiere. Final Cut Pro was great in this regard, but also slow to analyze. The best, of course, is to shoot it so you don't need to stablize much at all or use a steadycam device at acquisition.

     
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    Feb 22, 2012 10:24 PM   in reply to Enver Pex
    Is there anything else that can be done to make this process less time-consuming?

     

    Yes.  Use a tripod.

     
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    Feb 22, 2012 10:53 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Absolutely Jim!

     
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    Feb 23, 2012 2:33 PM   in reply to Enver Pex

    To save some time jumping back and forth between PPro and AE, you could use a PPro pluggin such as Mercali right on the time line.  But, no, there isn't a way around waiting for the pluggin to do its analysis.

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 12:07 PM   in reply to Enver Pex

    I have the same problem. I have a couple of hundred clips that all need Warp Stabilization due to the limitations of filming..

    here is one of those clip actually...

     

    We started replacing the clips with AE Comps but I would recommend DON'T. The memory and CPU load of Warp Stab' is so high makes everything come to a grinding halt as PPro tries to touch all the clips.

     

    Instead, as painful as it sounds, drop each video file into AE and fix them there and export them again to a Digital Intermediate/Editing Mode of choice.

     

    good luck..

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 12:24 PM   in reply to Enver Pex

    Enver Pex wrote:

     

    Take an average home video tape, cut it up into clips, and you have yourself between 15 and 100 clips in Premiere.

     

     

     

    I think I would definitely just put the entire uncut footage into AE and stabilize it first, then export it and re-import to PPro to be cut into clips. But yes, a batch processing script for this would be nice.

     
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