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Need a word in English

Feb 28, 2012 4:51 AM

Nothing to do with Illie, but has anyone got the right word in English for the top three handles in the picture below?

They are countersunk or routed (?) into the surface of drawers and cupboard doors.

Countersunk is right for screws but I'm not sure if it's right for handles like this.

Any ideas?

Picture 1.png

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 5:39 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    As oposed to handles the are draw pulls and sometimes jut referred to as pulls also door pulls.

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 5:40 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Rebated? As in, set into a rebate.

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 5:51 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Rebate is correct as an English (British) woodworking term. Not certain about it being used for cabinet hardware. In American English, that type of pull would be called a "recessed pull."

     

    In looking in the UK via Google:

    http://www.bkservicesonline.co.uk/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath =7_16_417

    where it is called a "flush inset" pull for the above site and example.

     

    Take care, Mike

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 8:59 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Steve,

     

    I would suggest your using inset handle (flush inset handle if you must).

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 9:21 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Over here we would use rabbet rather than rebate,  variant spellings of the same word.

     
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    Feb 28, 2012 9:36 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Technically speaking, it isn't a rebate nor rabbet (for the 'Mericuns such as me, though I use the British term in my woodworking).

     

    Because it is a blind hole, it is a mortise nor matter the English used. Doesn't matter if it is square, rectangular nor circular. It's a mortise.

     

    Jacob's term(s) is the more accurate one, despite the retailer I linked to.

     

    Take care, Mike

    (a recovering woodworker)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 12:09 PM   in reply to MW Design

    Probably I'm wrong, but in my eyes it's a coffin for a fat man (1), a coffin for a beanpole (2) and a coffin for the Earth (3).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 12:54 PM   in reply to Kurt Gold

    I wonder: is a rabbit hole blind?

     

    Probably I'm wrong,

     

    Impossible, Kurt, just look here:

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/message/4149914#4149914

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 3:20 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Steve,

     

    We are in deep details here (luckily far from being deep in something else), where things become a bit woolly and pleasantly challenging, especially since the number of terms is smaller than that of the items they decribe, especially when uses are taken into account.

     

    Before suggesting anything, I had a look in the OED to make sure I was remembering what I thought I was remembering, and from that I would say that a rebate is a through thing, from end to end of the edge, and that a mortise can be there without a tenon, serving a rather wide range different purposes, the combined term only appearing in the second sense in the OED.

     

    By the way, the word rebate is consistently listed in dictionaries with reebait mentioned before rabbit, as some of us (still, maybe sillily so) prefer it; and in my other favourite dictionary, which is very distinct in its distinction between BE and AE, rabbet is listen as another word for rebate.

     

    But I believe usage is the key, and doubtlessly usage differs, with time, country, phase of the moon, and other important influences.

     

    In any case, the visitors will doubtlessly be doubtless.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 28, 2012 8:00 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    ...a rebate doesn't necessarily go all the way from end to end of an edge...

     

    Yep, a blind rebate. I failed to notice the top one closely enough. Though I would probably have called that one a recessed pull as well

     

    Anyway,  it's been a pleasant diversion away from pixels and bits.

     

    Take care, Mike

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 3:09 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    I still prefer mortise over blind rebate, as in I in the image below, but that is just usage.

     

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.shopsmith.com/academy/m ortistenon/images/F8_5LG.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.shopsmith.com/academ y/mortistenon/index.htm&h=749&w=600&sz=21&tbnid=fsINHiRWAjlUsM:&tbnh=9 5&tbnw=76&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dmortise%2Bimages%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&z oom=1&q=mortise+images&docid=Aq-uc1xe5aoUKM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=CwROT_jOLo_T sgaKu6nEDw&ved=0CF0Q9QEwEw&dur=716

     

    You may also get into trouble with the RSPCA or the new Icelandic constitution if you tell anyone that you make blind rabbits for use in furniture.

     

    Recessed pull is descriptive.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 4:20 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    It was nice that collectively we were able to assist in working it out. And I agree that a handle is more to something you grab a hold of as opposed to reaching into and pulling as opposed to tugging

     
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