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@mpeters10
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Problems with video showing green.

Feb 29, 2012 10:28 AM

What would cause PRE9 to begin covering most of the preview screen with green on the videos I am trying to edit?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 10:34 AM   in reply to @mpeters10

    Welcome to the forum.

     

    Such display issues are almost always related to an obsolete video driver. Usually, updating the video driver to the latest, will restore the Program Monitor's display.

     

    What is the make/model of your video card?

     

    What is the version/date of the installed video driver?

     

    What is the latest video driver from the mfgr's. Web site, say nVidia, or ATI/AMD?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 10:36 AM   in reply to @mpeters10

    There are also links to several threads, with similar problems, in this THREAD. Follow those links, to see if this is what you are experiencing.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 10:48 AM   in reply to @mpeters10

    OK, I would go to the AMD Web site, plug in your card, and your OS, and download and install the latest video driver. Do not trust Windows, or any utility to tell you if you have the latest driver, as those will likely be 6 mos. out of date.

     

    Even simple OS updates and hot-fixes, can render a video driver obsolete, and that is why AMD, and nVidia, issue drivers with such regularity.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 11:55 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Something is not supported but it may not be your video drivers. What kind of camcorder was this recorded on?

     

    While Bill may be right when he states that video issues may be caused by video drivers this is not a common issue that I have seen or found in my working with Premiere Elements, more often the camcorder file format is not supported. More to the point the wrapper or file format is not supported by the program so you get bad video from the program in the form of either no video or green screen. I have seen this with several different camcorders but never with different older drivers, I have never had a problem with drivers for my video card and any of Premiere Elements versions and I have been reviewing them for several years. The main problme I have encountered is the format of the files does not work with Premiere Elements but the same file may work with Premiere Pro. If it works with one program and not the other it is not the drivers but the program.

     

    Bill, I'm sorry to say it but you are way wrong when you keep stating that video drivers need to be updated and are the main cause of problems. Most video driver updates simply add game support to the new versions, not support for video editing. The drivers should be updated but any particular driver that is six months to a year old should work just fine with Premiere Eleemnts, its the file format or as you like to put it the wrapper.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 12:41 PM   in reply to jeffgedgaud

    Well, with many solved user probelms, related directly to the obsolete video driver, I would beg to differ.

     

    Programs, like PrE, PrPro, AfterEffects, and now, even Photoshop, interface with video drivers, much more closely, than anything else, save for CAD (usually special drivers), heavy 3D and extreme gaming. The GUI, and also the Timeline playback are heavily dependent on that interaction with the video driver. Because of this heavy interfacing with the video driver, those Adobe programs will point out problems, that most other programs will never encounter - Word, Excel, IE, the mail client, etc., will all still function properly, and smoothly. They require much, much less from the video driver, than those Adobe programs do. I think that you are misinformed about what is required to use an Adobe NLE program, and how they work.

     

    Is updating the video driver always the fix for all problems? No way, but it is the first thing that I check, should any part of my display cease to function, because it is so common a problem, and is easy to fix. Though I do recommend updating video drivers, as a possible fix, when others experience display issues, I only do so, on my machines, when I experience an issue. As I have my Windows updating set to manual (the default is to do that behind the scenes and transparently to the user, with no notice, or interaction), I know to test my video sub-system, when I do update the OS. Over the last two years, I have had to update my nVidia GeForce 8800M GTX's and my nVidia Quadro FX-4500 drivers, maybe three times each. In every one of those instances, I had just updated Windows - though not all Windows updates caused me an issue. As of this writing, I am about 6 mos. out on the Quadro, and 3 mos. out on the 8800M.

     

    As far as saying that it's always a file format/CODEC, how can you explain why one day, a system w/ and Adobe NLE program will work, with that same Source Footage, and then, after an OS update, the display goes bad?

     

    Sorry, but I disagree with much of what you have said.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 1:37 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    He is using a laptop with mobile video graphics, updates to this set of graphics is almost always related to video games and this would not cause graphics to suddenly cease to work for a video editing program.

     

    While his problem may be caused by old drivers or another driver interferring with video your statement that " Such display issues are almost always related to an obsolete video driver." is not accurate. This is what I have an issue with in your reply and many of your other posts, its not the information you are passing on its the way your doing it and giving the wrong impression to users who are not as much into editing as you are. When a model number of a graphics card is followed by an M it means mobile which is a laptop. AMD Radeon HD 6770M came out in 2011 so his laptop is a newer one, at most a year old so drivers are pretty current. The 6770M is a fast middle class graphics chip set that is built to handle HD video and Blu-ray, it is usually in pretty good laptops which will mean ones that should be able to handle Premiere Elements.

     

    Updating drivers may help him but it would help to know if he recently updated his drivers, OS or other programs, what is the settings for automatic update and what else is the laptop specs like?

     

    Did anything happen between editing the last time it worked and now like updating something or installing something?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 1:51 PM   in reply to jeffgedgaud

    The experience that you cite is just not borne out by my experience. I have edited video on various laptops for about 12 years now, and have done many song-n-dance acts with their video chip drivers, going way back. One Toshiba never did have an update, though the chip was from nVidia. For five years, I had to "roll-my-own" video drivers from nVidia and a Web-based toolkit, to keep them updated, and the programs running smoothly. That was before I went with Adobe NLE's, and only had Photoshop, which was much less demanding, as it did not yet use OpenGL (one big fix for OpenGL issues with newer Photoshop versions, is to update the video driver - surprise).

     

    Like I mentioned, updating the video driver is not an end-all-be-all fix, but for so very many users (and that is pretty much across the Adobe board), it helps most.

     

    Hunt

     
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