Skip navigation
PeterPershan
Currently Being Moderated

Photoshop for Undergraduates

Feb 29, 2012 2:27 PM

Tags: #student #marketing

I am developing a course on photography and was intending to include lessons in the use of Adobe Photoshop.

 

Unfortunately, I discovered that the student's cost for a license would be nearly $200.

This is unfortunate since PhotoShop is a great project; however, in view of the cost

I am now planning on usng the freeware Gimp.

 

I suspect that Adobe might eventually lose customers by not having a marketing

option for instructional use. Nevertheless, my students and I will probably do very

well with Gimp.

 

Too Bad

 

Peter Pershan

Harvard  Univ.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 2:43 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    Harvard  Univ. and $200 is to much for the student version? Ok...but in a photo class you would prolly be better served teaching Lightroom which is $99 for the student version or even Elements which is less (price varies a lot).

     

    P.S. you do know this is a User to User Forum right? You aren't talking to Adobe here.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 2:49 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    That is an interesting take on 'value'. How much is tuition where you work and will you continue to work for your students long after they have graduated? 

     

    In addition to GIMP, also consider RawTherapee. These free programs run on Win/Mac/Lin, which is more than can be said for Photoshop.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 3:19 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    The university probably already has a volume license for Photoshop for use in other classes or common computing sites.

     

    The student pricing is for the full software that the students can keep -- not for just a semester, and not for limited functionality.

    And that is significant discount off the full $700 - $1000 price for Photoshop.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 3:20 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    Interesting that you feel a student Photoshop license is too expensive.

     

    I'll bet they blow $200 on one night out with the girlfriend or boyfriend, on gas to drive home to see their parents, on a couple of months of cell phone plan...  Out of curiosity, what does a typical printed textbook cost a student nowadays?

     

    Does teaching them "Gimp" have much real-world use?  Anyone serious about imaging is using Photoshop.

     

    Have you considered Photoshop Elements (I see Jeff has asked this also)?

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 3:21 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    >> Out of curiosity, what does a typical printed textbook cost a student nowadays?

    Don't know, but several of my Physics textbooks cost that much back in the 80s.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 3:55 PM   in reply to Chris Cox

    I know. I sent my son back to university for the winter semester with $1,000 for books. He called to say just one book for one engineering course, was $250, so please send more money. And he's taking six courses.

     

    And yeah, since when are Harvard students strapped for cash?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 5:13 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    ...Does teaching them "Gimp" have much real-world use?...

    What is your definition of 'real-world'? In just the past week there have been a half million downloads of GIMP from sourceforge.net (just one of the many sources for GIMP). The numbers seem to indicate that people in the real world find value in GIMP as an image editor.

     

    A good teacher does not teach software. They teach concepts that work in any software. GIMP isn't really so different.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 6:44 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Last time I looked at The Gimp, admittedly a year or two ago, all I saw was a bug-ridden toy that barely worked.  I'm sorry to be blunt, and maybe my information is dated, but it was worth exactly what it cost (less when you consider time I wasted futzing around with it to get it to work).  Should Harvard be teaching people to use junkware?

     

    But you make a good point - why not just teach fundamentals, and advise the students to get Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paintshop, IrfanView, or Gimp - whatever their budget allows.  Show examples using Photoshop and assume the bright young minds would easily be able to translate to whatever else.  I should hope they can do that, or the world is in for REAL trouble.

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 9:16 AM   in reply to PeterPershan

    PeterPershan wrote:

     

    RawTherapee does not work on OSX10.7...

    Are we certain?

     

    The download page for RawTherapee shows downloads for 10.6, just as Photoshop shows system requirements for 10.5/10.6. That does not necessarily mean that these programs do not work in later versions of the OS.

     

    I also use DarkTable on Linux but it looks like you might run it on OS X as well:

    http://www.darktable.org/install/

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:05 AM   in reply to PeterPershan

    That same goofy site has people saying that Photoshop can't save files in Lion.

    http://roaringapps.com/app:412#post-1381

     

    I've heard the electric light is from the devil so I won't try it. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:15 AM   in reply to PeterPershan

    Photoshop is available in volume licenses, including keyed versions, and should be available on your campus.

    And if you're using color profiles, then GIMP isn't going to help at all.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:32 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    ...And if you're using color profiles, then GIMP isn't going to help at all.

    On what do you base that?

     

    GIMP has supported ICC/ICM since 2007.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:41 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    >> GIMP has supported ICC/ICM since 2007.

     

    You forgot the words "poorly, incompletely, and incorrectly".

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:43 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Marian #7, not often we agree 100%, but here we do!

     

    A good teacher does not teach software. They teach concepts that work in any software.

     

    Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 11:25 AM   in reply to PeterPershan

    I take it $100 for Photoshop Elements is too much too?

     

    If so, I'm left to wonder...  What cameras are these students who can't afford $100 going to be using?

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 1:21 PM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    >> GIMP has supported ICC/ICM since 2007.

     

    You forgot the words "poorly, incompletely, and incorrectly".

    I realize that GIMP's CM history has been rough but I just shuffled a couple files between GIMP 2.6.12 and PS5.1. It appeared to be in order.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 1:55 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    PeterPershan wrote:

     

    You are probably right that Elements might work, on the other hand, now that I have discovered GIMP I may just use that.

     

    Again, if you are teaching a photo course as apposed to a digital imaging course, then I think you need to look at Lightroom. It's a photo based imaging application that is designed for photographers not graphic artists. The student version is $99 and it has a 30 day demo.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 3:02 PM   in reply to Jeff Schewe

    If all he needs is 30 days, then the Photoshop trial version would work as well.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:59 PM   in reply to PeterPershan

    It looks like your Law School has a computer lab with Photoshop available.  http://www.law.harvard.edu/about/administration/its/students/additiona l-information-pages/lab.html

     

    Here in NY most community colleges have Photoshop available in at least some of the on campus computer labs.

     

    Regardless, if you're going to have the students shoot RAW and you want to go open source, I'd suggest taking a look at RawTherapee.  Truth has a date stamp - just because someone says it won't work on a given platform doesn't mean that is still the case even as of the latest compile.

     

    Having said that, I just bought Photoshop and with the exception of not yet knowing how (if?) to spot white balance an image, I'm doing raw processing just about as quickly and, sad for this open source aficianado to say, getting better results out of my crappy photography skills (only had a dSLR for 2 months now) with ACR / Ps than I was with RawTherapee.

     

    Have you checked out the curriculum thingees that Adobe has in their educational resources area?  Might be some neat ideas for assignments.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)