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Editing low-res proxy, then applying changes to high-res

Mar 1, 2012 6:08 AM

Tags: #image #mac #cs5.5 #performance #slow #5.5 #proxy #smudge #high-resolution

Hello

 

  I'm developing one continuous image for a large wall that will be seen from about 1-2 feet viewing distance. It has to be about 100 dpi.

 

  My image is currently 21,600 x 8100 pixels at 8 bits CMYK. It may get bigger. I don't have to do much manipulation, but a lot of it is using brushes and the smudge tool.

 

2 issues:

 

1) I have a 12-core Mac Pro with 24GB RAM. The smudge tool is sloooooow when working on this image (like one smudge at max brush size takes 15-20 seconds to take effect).

 

2) IS there a "warp mesh" tool that I can use in place of the smudge tool?

 

  Is there a way for me to edit a lower-resolution version of this image, then apply the changes I made to the high-res version? then I can use the smudge and brush tools and finessé my work without the machine bogging down, and the imagery will look correct. I'm looking for a way to use these tools more in real time while working with this big image.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 6:23 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    2) IS there a "warp mesh" tool that I can use in place of the smudge tool?

    Have you tried Filter > Liquify?

     

    Is there a way for me to edit a lower-resolution version of this image, then apply the changes I made to the high-res version?

    One could work with Smart Objects and later switch in higher resolution content, though that is little/no use for painting but rather for transformations for example.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 7:14 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    If you would tell uns what exactly you are trying to do maybe someone could help you (screenshots might help illustrate the issue).

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,471 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 7:14 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    Why are you editing in CMYK instead of RGB?  Using RGB could net you some speed improvement.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 7:15 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    Additionally:

    Why do you work in CMYK?

    Are you working with CS5?

     

    On performance in general:

    http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/404/kb404439.html#main_Memory%20Usage

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 7:30 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    Depending on the curvature the Filter > Displace with a custom Displacement Map might also be an option – albeit not a terribly intuitive method and the possible offset is limited, if I remember correctly.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,471 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 1, 2012 10:05 AM   in reply to spdorsey6969

    spdorsey6969 wrote:

     


    This appears to be working, buit I have not tested it with large brush sizes yet. The brush size in Liquify tops out at 1500px, which is still waaaay too small for the nice, smooth curve I have to create over a 10,000 pixel area. I'll post with results of my tests.

     

    It seems Adobe hasn't come out with Photoshop CS6 quickly enough for you.  They're advertising that Liquify will be both MUCH faster and allow HUGE brush sizes.

     

    -Noel

     
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