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CS5 Locking Up System

Feb 23, 2012 11:17 PM

  Latest reply: Sidarthurr, Mar 14, 2012 12:55 AM
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 3, 2012 5:31 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Everyone has their limits.  I've been going through mental gymnastics to figure out what it would take to put together a modern dual hex-core workstation, and the level of complexity and uncertainty briefly reached my limits when I recently learned that the motherboards one finds in Dell Precision T5500 systems are not all created equal.

     

    The point is that some things follow rules and some are just arbitrary, and everything has to be right for it to work, and exactly right for it to work well.  The realm of computing defies being oversimplified, even though operating system manufacturers are striving to make the user experience simpler.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Mar 3, 2012 7:40 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    That's also true of the Asus boards in the HP Slimline series. When I checked the board number, according to Asus, there is no on board video. But in fact, there is, probably for some versions.

     

    I'm doing some investigations on two measurement devices, Spectrum Analyzers and Arbitrary Waveform Generators.

     

    Either system makes a computer seem like a walk in the park.

     

    Yikes!

     

    -Lawrence

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 3, 2012 10:08 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Sidarthurr wrote:

     

    From my research, it seems that a larger power supply means A LOUDED POWER SUPPLY and I sure don't want my computer to get any louder than it currently is!

     

    Check out the PSU's from Seasonic and/or Corsair; I'm pretty sure the Corsair's are rebranded Seasonic's.

     

    The Seasonic "X Series" use a hybrid passive/forced cooling system - sorry, not sure of the Corsair equivalent. This means the fan doesn't start to spin 'til the unit reaches about 20% of its load, that's not going to happen if you're just surfing the Web etc, and because they use one of the quietest fans available, when the fan is running you really don't hear it.

     

    They use top rated components, and the units are highly efficient, my one is "Gold" rated, +80% efficient; I personally wouldn't use the Coolmax you linked to.

     

    Good luck

    Paul

     
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    Mar 3, 2012 4:29 PM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    For PSU's, you might want to look at the Extreme Power Supply Calculator.

     

    There are also several PSU's listed on that page.

     

    As for fitting into your case, you might want to measure the area, the size of your existing unit, and then look at the specs. for the various units.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - I have a CoolerMaster 1200W, that fits nicely into my mid-tower case, and is quiet, especially compared to the 9 fans that the case has.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 3, 2012 4:39 PM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Finding a good tech for a graphics workstation, it harder, than it might initially seem.

     

    For my last workstation, I interviewed about six techs, and 5 had no clue what I needed, or what I was running. They made some wild recs., and statements, and were a complete wash. One was even a highly recommended enterprise server builder, but when it came to a box for Photoshop, AfterEffects and Premiere Pro, did not know what he was talking about. I feel bad for some of his clients. After 6 mos. of looking, I mentioned my problem to a friend, who is a research physician, and does heavy 3D imaging in his research. He had a builder in mind, and in 5 mins., I knew that I had found my tech. He completely understood what a graphics workstation was, and also how 2D differed from 3D. I used to build my own, but things have changed so quickly, that it would take me longer to come up to speed today, and cost me more $ in the end, than to hire someone, who knew exactly what was available, how to put it together, and get it to run perfectly. It's like working on automobiles. I once did 90% of my own work, until my wife bought a Saab 900T. I popped the bonnet, could only find the turbo, closed the bonnet, and let a Saab mechanic do all the work. Now, with her Mercedes, I stay clear of anything under that hood, as I do not recognize one piece...

     

    When you do find your tech, level completely with them. Tell them exactly how you plan on using your machine. Tell them to not cut corners, and go with their recs.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 3, 2012 5:20 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Yes, I know about Saabs as well. I would like to do my own clutch but even that!

     

    If I were to go custom these folks come to mind:

     

    http://www.pugetsystems.com/aboutus.php

     
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  • Pierre Courtejoie
    7,052 posts
    Jan 11, 2006
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    Mar 5, 2012 12:30 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Yes, you do not need to have a previous version installed.

    You will need a qualifying version: http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/826/cpsid_82641.html (not a student edition, not a suite to a single product...) serial number, that you will enter in the appropriate field during the installation.

    What makes you believe that you received wrong information? I do not think that anyone contradicted that statement when you received it.

    On this page of a troubleshooting guide for installation issues, it is clearly stated that there is a moment in the installation where a serial number from a previous version will need to be entered: http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/828/cpsid_82831.html this is information from Adobe, should be good enough to be trusted, no?

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 5, 2012 6:46 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Sidarthurr wrote:

     

    Is it true that I only need the serial number from the previous upgrade to install the CS5 upgrade on my computer?

     

     

    Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you believe it when I said it?  Did you forget already?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 5, 2012 9:03 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    What's your specific intent with Ghost?  Are you thinking you want to make a backup image of your current setup, format the disk, then reinstall the Ghost image?

     

    If so, that would be a waste of time.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 5, 2012 9:11 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Ah, so you are looking to make a backup after you do a clean install, so that you can restore that backup in the future.

     

    Windows Backup actually does that quite well.  It's called a System Image backup.  No need for 3rd party software.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 5, 2012 9:35 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Yes.

     

    Was there some part of the wording in the Microsoft description that you linked-to that left any doubt?

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/What-is-a-system-image

    "You can use a system image to restore the contents of your computer if your hard disk or computer ever stops working. When you restore your computer from a system image, it's a complete restoration"

     

    Unfortunately, it seems particularly difficult for me to communicate with you, which is atypical, so I'm just going to bow out here.  I really do have better things to do than to repeat things over and over to you to try to get you to believe them.  Good luck with your system changes; I hope everything works well for you when you get it all together.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 8, 2012 8:31 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    I don't know whether you're trying to make yourself feel better with these incessant posts or what, but I really no longer have any interest in communicating with you.  Please just let it drop.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Pierre Courtejoie
    7,052 posts
    Jan 11, 2006
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    Mar 11, 2012 9:00 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Besides Chris Cox, all the other responders in this thread do not work for Adobe.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2012 8:18 AM   in reply to Sidarthurr

    Sidarthurr wrote:

     


    If you see flaws in my reasoning please let me know

     

    Your reasoning - that you want to make sure you're acting on good information - is sound.  How you, personally, are trying to accomplish that could use some work.

     

    Please allow me to offer some constructive suggestions for improving your future forum experiences...

     

    Soliciting information or opinions can be done with respect and humility, or it can be done in such a way as to insult the people who are trying to help.  It's worth striving for the former.

     

    Ignoring what you're told and publicly exclaiming that you don't believe the answers you're given are just plain rude.  Try not to be rude to the folks who help you.  Look up the connotations of the phrase "bite the hand that feeds you" some time.

     

    Understand that in asking for help you are already saying "I don't know the answer", and the people who respond really have no responsibility to convince you of anything beyond a reasonable doubt - they are just sharing their knowledge.  You, in turn, are simply accumulating knowledge and clues of things you didn't know about to help YOU learn enough to get the answers right.

     

    And finally, rudeness cannot be called back later by exclaiming "Amazingly, you were right!", no matter how many times you repeat it.  Often it's best just to say thanks and move on.

     

    May I now suggest now to you to "pay it forward" and try to help others online with the knowledge you have.  Being in "helper's shoes" will allow you to see the things I've mentioned above more clearly, and you will learn a lot - those who strive to help others know that doing so is a great way to grow and learn more themselves.

     

    -Noel

     
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