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Arranging clips in the Timeline

Mar 4, 2012 11:45 AM

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 4, 2012 11:45 AM   in reply to Community Help

    in pse 10, how can i change the duration of still slides? Not video clips.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 4, 2012 1:00 PM   in reply to tamilynngs

    For PsE, open Organizer, select photos you want to use, select Create>Slideshow and a Preferences window will open, to select slide duration, transistion, and transition timing. A viewer will open, to add more photos, and you now can tweak your settings before finalizing.

     

    PsE Image Duration.png

     

    If you meant PrE, then use the Edit>Preferences>General and set the Still Images Duration for how many frames you want the image to be.

     

    Still Image Duration.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 7:01 AM   in reply to Community Help

    I am having trouble nudging (moving by milliseconds) an audio voice over to lock in with the original audio track on the video.I have looked up beat markers and they dont seem to be there but there is a purple line in the timeline which the CTI is locked to and that is not allowing me to nudge accurately. It is not the snap function but the CTI is certainly locked to it. How do i get rid of it? i cant find the answer in the help but i imagine it is something obvious.

    Thanks for any advice.

     

    Thanks for your advice.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 8:57 AM   in reply to sound space

    One can only move Video by Frame - the smallest unit in Video AMPT TimeCode. There is no way to have partial Frames. That gets you accuracy to between 1/25th of a sec. and 1/30th of a second.

     

    If you turn Snap OFF, and if the Audio & Video are from a muxed (both Audio & Video Stream in one file), by Alt-clicking on just the Audio portion, you can independently move it. Unfortunately, PrE does not allow one to change the TimeCode from SMPT to Audio Units, like PrPro can, so you still cannot move the Audio with exacting perfection. In PrPro, if you switch to Audio Units, you can nudge by 1/48,000 th of a sec. In PrE, you are limited to moves of 1/25th (PAL), or 1/30th of a sec.. Still, with the human eye and ear, those are adequate, as sync that close is enough - finer settings are not needed for most audiences.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jun 24, 2012 2:28 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks Bill, as usual you are a mine of information. I am used to audio and moving things by samples so have got caught out here. Unfortunately the 1/25th of a second (PAL here in Australia) out of sync is quite noticeable to my eye so I'm not satisfied with this. It looks like i will have to trade up to PrPro. I am using a sony camera so AVCHD format and 16 bit 48khz audio, so in your view i will be able to nudge to within 1/48th of second? This should just be enough. I hope Pr Pro is not too much of a steep learning curve (i am still new to Elements so not a lot ot unlearn).

    cheers

    Michael

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 2:38 PM   in reply to sound space

    Michael,

     

    With PrPro, you can nudge the Audio to 1/48,000th of a second (OZ doesn't use the period, in lieu of the comma, like much of Europe, does it, though it IS in PAL-land?). In PrPro, one just clicks on the SMPT TimeCode, displaying in 00;00;00;00 for NTSC, or 00:00:00:00 for PAL, and choose Audio Units, which will give you the Sample-Rate, which in most cases will be 48KHz (24 and 32KHz are possible, but less common). SMPT TimeCode is the default, and for most operations, what one wants.

     

    Again, you will want to turn Snap OFF, though remember to turn it back ON, when done - hitting the S Key toggles it ON/OFF.

     

    Video will still be limited to frame-specific accuracy, but that is film and video.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - also remember that you are a much more critical observer and listener, than the vast majority of your audience.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 2:51 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Yup Bill, we use the period down here, but i am used to the comma.

    I just found 799 good reasons not to upgrade to PrPro - maybe i am too picky? I am a mac user as well so the other route is to try Final Cut Pro which is cheaper in the new version, but there may be similar problems there, and I have never found a support base as good as the one premiere newbies get with people such as yourself, so another good reason for staying with premiere.

     

    I'll have to think on it.

    Thanks again,

     

    Michael

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 3:18 PM   in reply to sound space

    Michael,

     

    Those 799 good reasons are ones that just keep me from telling everyone, "Hey, just upgrade to PrPro... " One must really need it.

     

    One thing that you might consider, if you do not have licenses to Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, Audition (now for the Mac too), and a few others, is the Production Premium (think that is still the name for the suite below the full Master Collection). It comes packed with great programs, including Adobe Encore for DVD/BD authoring (comes bundled with all versions of PrPro), at a fraction of the cost of buying them all, and not much more than buying, say PrPro, After Effects or Photoshop. It's almost a 10 for the price of 3 deal. Still, not a cheap solution, by anyone's imagination.

     

    Thanks for the period/comma info - I just was not sure about that.

     

    Before you jump on FCPx, I would do a bunch of research. With its release, a ton (and I mean a TON) of FCP fans jumped ship for PrPro.

     

    One thing that might help you, but I do not know of a way to do it, without a bunch of tests and experiments, would be to Razor the Audio file into smaller increments, where necessary, and then apply Time Stretch to it. I think that PrE has Maintain Pitch (like PrPro does), to get tiny adjustments. I know of one PrPro user, who uses a Zoom recorder for the lav mics in his weddings, and it is slightly out of sync with his cameras' sound. Through experimentation, he found that if he used Time Stretch to increase the Audio by ~ .04%, it would then be in perfect sync to that camera sound. Being an audio-guy, you probably know a few even better tricks, but with the same basic idea.

     

    Good luck, and wish that I had more to offer.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 4:14 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Brilliant advice Bill - my mind is racing. I'll see where it takes me.

     

    Thank you many tmes

     

    michael

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 4:30 PM   in reply to sound space

    Michael,

     

    As the Audio Units issue has come up several times, over the years here, if you do find a good workaround, please share that.

     

    Though I do a fair amount of audio work, it all revolves around video, and is mostly in NLE programs, like PrPro, or PrE, so I am not comfortable with a full-fledged DAW. I do use Audition often, but still, it's related to video. Hope that your expertise can be useful in this matter, and that others will benefit.

     

    Good luck, and keep us posted,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jun 24, 2012 4:42 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Best idea I can think of is what your colleague does: cut into smaller sections and time stretch and shift each one as required - very fiddly though.

    Easier to use mic preamps in camera and lock audio in with video...

     

    If something else comes up i'll get back to you.

     

    cheers

     

    M

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 5:05 PM   in reply to sound space

    Easier to use mic preamps in camera and lock audio in with video...

    <Rant Mode On>

     

    Back in the days of film, prior to digital-anything, that was how we'd do it.

     

    Then, we used a cine camera, with a crystal clock, and a Nagra recorder, also with a crystaly clock. We would establish one to be the "master," and the other to be the "slave." They were connected via cable. One device would control the other, and then in editing, we'd go to the slate in the film, and the clap in the audio, and align them. When done, we lock things down, either on a Moviola, or with rewinds and a sync-block, and that was that.

     

    Now, where we have digital control, and to some very fine levels, one would think that ALL cameras, and all recorders, could be synced 100%, but mfgrs. will not get in bed with each other, so there are variances, that contribute to OOS issues, in post. It should NOT be, but it is.

     

    Other than the cable, which tethered our gear, we had 100% sync, and that was way back into the late 60's, Why the "industry" does not force ALL producers to adhere to the exact same specs. eludes me, and my old-fashioned cine thinking.

     

    It is possible, and should be universal.

     

    <Rant Mode Off>

     

    Sorry,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 9:23 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Total agreement my end! And one hopes the more it is talked about the closer we get to industry groups sitting down, agreeing to formats, and everyone comng on board. (Eventually those who dont come to the party lose business...)

     

    Cheers

     

    M

     
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