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LiquidBronze
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New to Audition a few questions...

Mar 3, 2012 8:08 PM

Hi all,

 

After using Sonic Foundry/Sony Acid for over 10 years, I have finally decided to move on. I picked up audition 5.5 and it is very different to say the least. Some basic questions and I hope these options are available in Audition, I just can't find them.

 

The master meter barely shows any information. In Acid, it would show the left and right channels together, along with the db's, like any external mixer meter. It also showed positive numbers past 0db and would "stick" at the highest points, so you can gauge quickly what level the sound is at. In Audition, I don't see any way to make it do that, for instance this was incredibly useful in multitracking, you could see the levels of each sound and it would "stick" in a small box if it was say +1.5db above 0.

 

How can I view my "workspace" i.e. if I have tons of samples in a folder? I want to easily import samples or browse the samples by just dragging them into a track. I know you can import by clicking in the track, but I will need to mass import to multiple tracks, so that will take a long time...

 

How do you save a session file for a single sound? I found out you can save sessions for mulitracks, but can't you do it for a single sound?

 

Also, is there a gate in the default Audition effects? I can't seem to find it.

 

I appreciate your help, thanks all

 

LB

 
Replies
  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,615 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 4, 2012 2:20 AM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    LiquidBronze wrote:

     

    The master meter barely shows any information. In Acid, it would show the left and right channels together, along with the db's, like any external mixer meter. It also showed positive numbers past 0db and would "stick" at the highest points, so you can gauge quickly what level the sound is at. In Audition, I don't see any way to make it do that, for instance this was incredibly useful in multitracking, you could see the levels of each sound and it would "stick" in a small box if it was say +1.5db above 0.

     

    You haven't got the mixing levels hot enough if you aren't able to modulate anywhere 0dB. There's no point in being able to go beyond this, because that's the point (in Audition) where digital clipping occurs. If you go beyond this, then the clip indicators at the top will light. Doesn't matter too much if you exceed 0dB in Audition's mixer though, because the Floating Point mix engine will let you normalize the signal back to a sensible level after the event without loss. But if you mix like this, your sound device (which works in integer mode because it has to) won't cope, so you'll hear distortion.

     

    How can I view my "workspace" i.e. if I have tons of samples in a folder? I want to easily import samples or browse the samples by just dragging them into a track. I know you can import by clicking in the track, but I will need to mass import to multiple tracks, so that will take a long time...

     

     

    Pick them up with the mouse (all at once if you want) and dump them in the files window. After a bit of experimenting, you'll find that the Ctrl and Shift keys can help you here...

     

    How do you save a session file for a single sound? I found out you can save sessions for mulitracks, but can't you do it for a single sound?

     

     

    If you have a single file in a multitrack session, then if you save it you have a session with a single sound in it - although why you'd want to do that isn't exactly clear... But in general, the best way to extract things from multitrack sessions is to investigate the options in Export - where you can isolate things to a very considerable degree. You can also export just parts of tracks the same way (highlight the bit you want to export first).

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,615 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 4, 2012 1:51 PM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    Er, yes, it's true to say that the present version is somewhat limited... and previewing is one of the 'limited' areas. there have been massive threads before about this, but it can be summed up quite simply by saying that Audition CS5.5 is a completely re-written dual-platform shell to which facilities will be added during future releases. The primary reason for the rewrite is the dual-platform nature of it now.

     

    And no, you don't get grids in MV, because generally there's no need for them. People tend to use markers, which are pretty flexible in a way that grids aren't!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 9:32 AM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    Hi,

     

    The warning lights remain on after clipping until you either restart playback or click the red light to reset that track indicator.  Generally, the value over 0dB isn't displayed for realtime meters as ANY clipping distorts the signal and would result in unrecoverable waveform data.  However, when you drop the fader so the signal is no longer clipping, the "Over" label should return to displaying the current output level if you have "Dynamic Peaks" selected in the meter options.  Right click any meter and select this option.

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,615 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 9:47 AM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    LiquidBronze wrote:

     

    I want an exact number, by how much it is over 0, i.e. 0.13, or 1.04 and for it to continue monitoring that in real time. So I go to turn down the volume to adjust it back and it still stays at "over" it will no longer monitor real time under 0db. Do I need to reset something to get those numbers back below 0db??

    The whole point is that you don't want an absolute number - you couldn't make any use of it anyway. In a Floating Point system, there's a staggering amount of 'virtual' headroom - about 1500dB of it, more or less. 0dB is only an absolute reference when it comes to Integer files - which are effectively what gets sent to your sound device, but as far as the software is concerned, it really doesn't matter about that. So, you are wondering, what do you do to get your files back to a value that won't cause any problems?

     

    This is where normalization comes in. When you've recorded your file (which you would normally do so that there were no peaks higher than about -9dB, because of the integer nature of the output from your sound device), then you can set it so that the highest peak reaches exactly the value that you want it to. If you open the file in Edit view, under effects>amplitude you'll find the normalize tool, and enter the peak value you want.

     

    So how does this work with playback? Well, since the mix engine is working in Floating Point mode, all the same things apply. You can shove the mix control up so that it distorts, but that distortion is only due to your sound device; you'll hear it certainly, but that's all - the Floating Point file itself is fine. So, if you mix everything hot, then you are going to end up with a very hot mixdown - but that can be normalized back to a sensible level very easily just the same way, with no loss.

     

    Incidentally none of this is about 'volume' as such - it's only about file levels. If you want the volume louder, then turn it up on your amp. Volume in this sense, and levels have no relationship at all.

     

    What the meters indicate is where your levels are in relation to a final integer output - which cuts off dead at 0dB. Yes you get a reasonable indication of what's going on like this, but ultimately those readings don't mean anything as far as Floating Point files are concerned. So the meters will show you relative levels between them, but the absolute levels are completely controlled by normalization - the effect of getting a file back to a 'normal' level WRT the 0dB level that your integer sound device tops out at.

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
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    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 10:46 AM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    LiquidBronze wrote:

     

     

    ok, was just playing around with everything now and I am starting to understand...sorry, I just learned over the years through ACID and kind of feel lost here as I am starting to realize this is a lot more "professional" then ACID ever was.

     

    Hmm... I don't really think that Acid ever really pretended to deal with audio properly - it's fine at what it does, but it wasn't intended to be an editor as such.

     


    One more question for now, when I go to edit my file from the mulitrack into the wavefore window, I can apply normalize (and other effects), but it does not seem to carry over into the multitrack wave form. How do I make it trasnfer over, hopefully I am explaining that correctly.

     

    If you have a file open in Multitrack and double-click on it so that it opens in Edit view, any changes you make to it will be reflected directly in the Multitrack instance of it. So to get the changed version, you just click on Multitrack again - you don't have to do anything else at all. This works because Multitrack is non-destructive - in other words, it's a posh file player. So if you make a change in Edit view (which is the destructive part of Audition), and it will be the changed file that's playing. Even if you haven't saved the changes. If you leave your changes unsaved and then try to close the Multitrack session it will prompt you to save them then.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 7:40 PM   in reply to SteveG(AudioMasters)

    Out of curiosity, could it be that the scale on Acid emulated an analogue meter with its zero point equivalent to around -18dBFS?  That wouldn't be very useful to those who understand the system but it might avoid confusion for those who work with a mix of analogue and digital metering.

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
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    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2012 1:35 AM   in reply to Bob Howes

    Hard to say. Acid 7 Pro looks as though it might be better than the simple version, but I can't tell from the screenshots what's actually happening.

     
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    Mar 10, 2012 2:57 PM   in reply to LiquidBronze

    That's probably due to Audition's Panning Law default settings. You can change it to Left/Right cut in Preferences/Multitrack/Panning Mode. This should cure your problem.

     

    A Google search on Audition Panning Law brings up lots of hits as to the reasoning behind these settings.

     
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