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Does anyone know where I can find an .inx file that would bring in the arabic language?

Mar 6, 2012 1:38 PM

Tags: #font #arabic

Hello,

 

I understand that there are issues with Arabic fonts in inDesign...I am not able to use the one I purchased, even when selected, they don't kick in. I was researching the possibility of getting other languages in the dropdown on the control panel, and that led me to some sites that offered .inx files that forced a particular language to appear in that dropdown menu...see image below.

 

Picture 6.png

 

The language I need would have to support Arabic..here is the name of the font?

 

AXtBAbeBol

AXtBAbeLig

 

Does anyone know where I could get an .inx file that would initiate a language that would support this font in this dropdown?

 

thanks

babs

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 6, 2012 1:40 PM   in reply to iBabs2

    I have seen a brilliant writeup somewhere of how languages get added to that dropdown, but I can't recall at all where it is. The shortcuts I use are either "place a Word doc that has text marked as Arabic" or "process INX/IDML through a tool like SDL Trados that has Arabic support."

     

    I've never seen those fonts before, and a web search for the filenames reveals this thread, and not much else. Not a good sign.

     

    Also, seeing the name "Lig" in a font doesn't inspire confidence; that's what we did back in ye olde twentieth century, with a whole separate font file for ligatures. For a language like Arabic that relies heavily on ligatures for correct text composition, that's also a non-good sign.

     

    I understand that there are issues with Arabic fonts in inDesign...I am not able to sue the one I purchased, even when selected, they don't kick in.

     

    So what are you expecting to happen? There are a bunch of things you need to set Arabic type in InDesign; I wouldn't say that there are issues with Arabic fonts in InDesign, but there are certainly issues that you will encounter if you don't know how to handle Arabic text in InDesign.

     

    Is the World-Ready Composer applied to your text? Do you actually have Arabic text flowed into InDesign? (Sorry, I have to ask. It happens far too often that people expect they can select English text, change to Arabic font, and get Arabic text.) Does your font appear at the bottom of the font list with all of the other non-Latin fonts? If you choose your font in the Glyphs menu and mouse over a given Arabic character, does InDesign report the Unicode glyph name correctly?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 6, 2012 1:42 PM   in reply to iBabs2

    How does a font"not kick in"? You have to type in the correct characters, you know.

     

    What version of ziD are you using? Just today I showed proofs to a client, with dozens of Arabic words in the main (English) text and an appendix entirely in Arabic. As it turned out (I always check), she was fluent in Arabic and she commended me with this great looking job. Done with CS4, Peter Kahrel's RTL scripts, and Adobe's own Arabic set of fonts.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 6, 2012 2:29 PM   in reply to iBabs2

    the best I can do is copy and paste the text I receive in an e-mail.

     

    Eek. For what it's worth, we have no idea if the text as displayed in your mail client is correct or not.

     

    If I paste it in text Edit, it works OK..but not InDesign..again, hence why I assumed it was a specific issues.

     

    In InDesign, you need to turn on the World-Ready Composer in order for two things:

    1) Right-to-left text flow (not right-align!)

    2) Text composition (Arabic is like cursive Latin script, all of the glyphs are supposed to plug into one another)

     

    If the WRC is not on, you're not actually making sense in Arabic.

     

    If I paste the type in and select it and apply the font, I just get pink, not even any characters, just pink lines.sorry again, that is what I meant by not kicking in ;-)

     

    That is a very bad sign.

     

    It means that probably your Arabic font is ancient and probably isn't actually an Arabic font. If you know anything at all about Arabic, you can try this test: Set some Latin-script text in your bizarro Arabic font. Select one letter. Go to Type -> Glyphs. The one letter you typed will be highlighted. Mouse over it. A mouseover popup should tell you the Unicode name (like LATIN SMALL LETTER B or something like that). Now, click on a single Arabic character. Mouse over. What's its name? I am betting that instead of "ARABIC LETTER HAH WITH HAMZA ABOVE" you'll get something like "LATIN LETTER O WITH DIAERESIS" meaning that your font is probably ancient & unusable. If you could read any Arabic at all, you'd at least be able to look at it and say "Why heck, that's not hah with hamza above!" but if you don't read Arabic you have no way to be sure.


    (That's reason 143 out of 3051 "why you shouldn't try to handle Arabic in InDesign if you can't read Arabic")

     

    Even if I start to type my font in, it seems to recognize it, but then once I tab out of the character field, it kicks back to Adobe Arabic.

     

    Your font is probably ancient & unusable. Try a different font.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 6, 2012 4:46 PM   in reply to iBabs2


    (That's reason 143 out of 3051 "why you shouldn't try to handle Arabic in InDesign if you can't read Arabic")

     

              I know I know...its all Greek to me!!!! I mean Arabic..Sorry, a little bad joke for a tired old lady here ;-)

     

     

     

    According to this graph, we should be saying "It's all Hindi to me"

     

    graph2.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 6, 2012 4:47 PM   in reply to Joel Cherney

    Here's the link to Language Log explaining the joy of the it's-all-Greek-to-me chart

     
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    Mar 7, 2012 9:32 AM   in reply to iBabs2

    Ah yes, I used ArabicXT on the regular when I was just starting out. Back in the 90s, it blew my post-collegiate mind to use professional-grade Arabic tools. To be honest, your font sounds like it is from the era of Quark 4 or thereabouts, so it makes sense that you'd want to take it back to Quark. Even if you're using a new version of Quark, I assume that ArabicXT maintains backwards compatibility for ye olde type 1 complex-script Mac fonts.

     

    Yep..its really bad....actually it now turns into a bunch of ??????? and that is the glyph it says it is...just a "?"..

     

    Oh, yeah. It's a different kind of bad than I thought it was, but it's still not something that is going to work in contemporary software without a gigantic pile of hacks. I have a few Mac T1 fonts for non-English languages that behave in exactly this way, and there's really nothing to do for 'em but to write little converters in Javascript that remap "?" to "ARABIC LETTER HAH WITH HAMZA ABOVE."  Which is, to be honest, the only reason I know anything at all about Javascript.

     

    Anyhow, have fun spending the afternoon in Quark, & good luck.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 10:25 AM   in reply to iBabs2

    There are a wide variety of ways to use the WRC in CS4 or above. If you know how to install a script, then this script creates a paragraph style with the WRC turned on and the text flowing right-to-left. If you're using CS5 or CS5.5 and would rather use a plugin with a nice user interface, try installing the demo for World Tools. (And if you're going to do Arabic on any kind of regular basis, it's worth every penny.)

     

     

    The quark thing isn't great. I can paste from word to a text box and some stuff comes in perfect, then some lines, the words gets switched around..not flopped, just out of order??? So, you have to copy and paste the order back line by line. Although the fact that others come in fine, is so add.

     

    Mailservers are  a pretty poor way to move Arabic text around from translators to formatters.  It seems to me, from your description, that your words in the email are right-to-left but either your email client or your clipboard is turning the spaces into left-to-right spaces. It'd be best to move all the text into, say, TextEdit, and a) PDF it and mail it back saying "I can't read Arabic, is this in the correct order?" and b) placing that RTF instead of trying to copy/paste.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 11:15 AM   in reply to iBabs2

    You have either the possibility to buy the ME version whichis incompatible to the western version of InDesign or if you need your wester version you can buy one of the world publishing plug ins (e.g. from in-tools.com) which will add ME capabilites to western versions.

    Copying arabic text into a western version without such an extension will cause further problems. Some of them you will not see, even MS Word is not fully capable to produce correct ME texts. E.g. numbers are like the western numbers, but Arabs have different numbers, often you will not realize when a left right text is undverible turned over.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 1:32 PM   in reply to iBabs2

    I will look into the publishing plug-in....I did load the script mentioned above and it actually did a pretty good job..except that every character is flipped!!! oy...

     

    Can you post a screenshot? It sounds to me like the WRC is on (the cursive-y bits plug into one another) but the text is flowing left to right. But I can't be sure... you might be using one of those ancient mirror-reversed fonts where the whole point was to lay out left-to-right and then mirror-reverse the frame.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2012 1:32 PM   in reply to Willi Adelberger

    Copying arabic text into a western version without such an extension will cause further problems. Some of them you will not see, even MS Word is not fully capable to produce correct ME texts. E.g. numbers are like the western numbers, but Arabs have different numbers, often you will not realize when a left right text is undverible turned over.

     

    Good point, Willi. Although I am in complete agreement with the gist of your post, I disagree a bit with your exact phrasing - it is possible to typeset fully correct Arabic in either InDesign or Word. It might not be beautiful; this is problematic in a language where calligraphic beauty is more generally important than it is in Latin-script languages. But it is possible, with adequate knowledge of how the script works combined with judicious insertion of left-to-right markers, right-to-left markers, manual insertion of Arabic-Indic digits, etc. etc., to set up Arabic correctly, in Word or in InDesign. It's even more complicated when you're doing Arabic, Farsi, and Urdu - not only does Arabic have a numeral system that differs from numerals used in Latin-script languages, but Urdu and Farsi use a numeral system that is similar but not identical to the system used in Arabic.

     

    And, for sure, copying & pasting Arabic into plain-vanilla English InDesign is problematic, depending on the localization of the OS, the clipboard settings, and so on. But, if you are Javascript-savvy, all of the RTL text processing tools that are available in World Tools are accessible to scripting. (At least, I think so... perhaps what I'm saying is only true of the previous version of World Tools for CS4.)

     

    I guess what I'm saying is (italics mine):

     

    Copying arabic text into a western version without such an extension will cause further problems. Some of them you will not see if you are not literate in Arabic, neither MS Word nor InDesign is not fully capable to produce correct ME texts without lots of work from someone who already knows the typesetting conventions of Arabic, and the limitations of the application, and of the OS in which it is installed.

     
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