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Export Quality ReHashed

Mar 5, 2012 1:36 PM

i am pretty savvy on compression. I am not a specialist but very comfortable with the process.

 

I have tried :

 

h264 vimeohd

both prores options

mpeg4

h264 bluray (getting multiple file here)

 

I have yet to get an output that is at the same quality as the seq. I am on a mac so if i output to same as seq i get an unplayable file. Because i am cutting .mts which is not native to snow leopard.

 

I have FCS2 (fcp6) but there is no crossover other than xml. If i could output to compressor i would.

 

AME crashes when i come out of the TL to encode so i must use premiers encoder. I dont know why AME crashes but it always has. AME works as a stand alone but not in the export chain.

 

so for mts 720p24 other than same as seq. what settings will give me the highest quality master to encode other formats from.?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 5, 2012 2:20 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    Uncompressed QT (mov) in your case.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 5, 2012 9:26 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    If i could output to compressor i would.

     

    "Adobe Media Encoder is much easier to use than Compressor, encodes faster, and produces much higher quality output"

     

    http://www.eventdv.net/Articles/News/Feature/Tutorial-Encoding-H.264-V ideo-in-Adobe-Media-Encoder-CS5.5-and-Apple-Compressor-4-80446.htm

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2012 9:48 AM   in reply to Preditor Corbett
    here is the screen shot from the TL

     

    You can't use Premiere Pro's built in monitors for quality control.  They are for monitoring content only.  You need a properly calibrated external TV to serve as a reference for color correction and grading.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2012 12:27 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    What is your waveform monitor telling you about your source in the TL and the Export?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2012 5:21 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    Lot of gamma issues exporting with adobe. Stuff looks different from codec to codec. It is horrible to deal with.

     

    Never had no blacks crush though. But I have not tried to export to Uncompressed. I genrally use Prores or Animation. Latter is clean while ProRes is gamma-screwed.

     

    Try exporting to i.e. Prores or Animation or an image sequence. And see if there is any difference to the uncompressed one.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2012 6:12 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    You can't use Premiere Pro's built in monitors for quality control.  They are for monitoring content only.  You need a properly calibrated external TV to serve as a reference for color correction and grading.

     

    How do you connect Premiere Pro to a calibrated external TV while CC and grading Jim?

     

    It puzzles me that you advise this and then also advise that there is no external monitoring solution in Premiere!

     

    Do you have a third party hardware solution?  Enlighten us please.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 9, 2012 9:03 AM   in reply to shooternz

    It puzzles me that you advise this and then also advise that there is no external monitoring solution in Premiere!

     

    Ah, good.  So you understand the problem we now face.

     

    Actually, what I'm calling for is a proper built-in monitoring solution, one that doesn't require third-party hardware, one that doesn't come with the limitations and bugs of third-party hardware.  Basically we need for HD formats what we had for SD formats using FireWire output - a pure signal untouched, unmanaged, and unaltered by the operating system or the graphics driver.

     

    Do you disagree with PP having such capabilities?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 9, 2012 12:57 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Actually I dont understand the problem because I am absolutely happy with my "external monitoring"  but I do feel it could be improved.  eg a tighter integration to hardware.

     

    I have hopes that Adobe Speedgrade will have to address this in some way by the very nature of what is required for a  professional CC and Grade application.

     

    My guess it will remain 3rd party hardware  for those that seriously require it.

     

    Meantime.. considering you dont seem to have CC/Grade/ Gamma issues...I just thought that you must have had a viable connection to an "external calibrated TV" considering how often you profer this advice to those that do.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 8:22 AM   in reply to shooternz

    I do feel it could be improved.  eg a tighter integration to hardware.

     

    Well, that's essentially what I'm talking about.  Taking Windows and the graphics driver out of the equation, so there's no possible way they can alter the signal.  Just like we had with DV.  A direct connection between PP and the video output of the graphics card.

     

    To me, it sounds like we're in agreement.

     

     

    .I just thought that you must have had a viable connection to an "external calibrated TV"

     

    I'm still working primarily in SD.  (Seems no one wants to pay for HD.)  So I have the luxury of using FireWire for proper connection.  But I'd really love that same scenario for when I do start working in HD (which may be soon).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 8:21 AM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    i did not grade thru that is because it was a web only project.

     

    That should not affect anything here.  The calibrated external monitor allows you to see the video as it is.  Without that, you do not see the image correctly, and any adjustments you make could be in the wrong direction.

     

    So, you use that correct image from the external monitor as a reference to make the video look the way you want.  Where it will end up is largely irrelevant.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 2:42 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    SD.  Now I understand.

     

    So, you use that correct image from the external monitor as a reference to make the video look the way you want.  Where it will end up is largely irrelevant.

     

    Issues such as gamma, luma high / low,  chroma  etc ( legalising video) are best observed in the scopes and adjusted  in the scopes.  Eyeballing them is no indication of where they are placed.and a dangerous practice for broadcast. Its a bit similar to judging exposures and levels in the camera viewfinder ( eg. without a field monitor and wfm)

     

    "look the way you want "... should not be such an issue for web viewing.

     

    Whatever...a high quality full raster monitor (calibrated) is up to both tasks and provision to use them already exists in Premiere. Just needs a tiny little mindset change.

     

    BTW - I do wonder if the infamous QT Gamma issues are more often an issue on Macs rather than PCs?  I certainly am less aware of it in the PC part of my workflow.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 7:04 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    What i am saying is that sometimes it is the eye and not the scopes that make the adjustment.

     

    Thats absolutely fine and obvious for the "looks"  but not for Broadcast legality ...as your previous experiences have told  you.

     

    So the solution is easy...

     

    a high quality full raster monitor (calibrated) is up to both tasks and provision to use them already exists in Premiere. Just needs a tiny little mindset change.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 11:07 AM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    For $1500, you can get very close to a broadcast quality monitor.  Since I work for a broadcast network, all of my productions have to be correct, so I normally always use the scope.  But here is what I also did, and it hasn't let me down yet:

     

    I purchased a 61" DLP display and a colorimeter, you can get both for under $1500.  Using a calibration disc and calibration software, I was able to calibrate the DLP in about 2 hours.  My before and after results were astounding, and my after results were very close to perfect.  So close, in fact, that I've never had a project rejected.

     

    The only downside to this is that it only works for HD, it is not suitable for SD (since it's been calibrated to 709).  We have a broadcast Sony monitor for SD (I think we paid $3500 for it).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 3:19 PM   in reply to Preditor Corbett

    A plasma can be calibrated as well, just make sure you find one that has a good CMS.  I'd suggest checking out AVSForum for that.

     
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