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Hard Drive bottle neck.   Running SRT thinking of switch to SSD

Mar 11, 2012 9:32 AM

Tags: #hardware #cs5.5 #avchd #5.5 #vs #ssd #premiere_pro_cs5.5 #premiere_cs5.5 #srt

I did the "windows experience index" on windows 7 on my new custom build.  I got 7.9 (which is the best score) on everything but the primary hard disk.  I got a 5.9 score for the primary hard disk.

 

I set up the drives with Intel's SRT with one 120 Patriot Wildfire Sata 3  drive (only using 60 gigs of it I am using for the SRT seeing that is the max and the other 60 gigs I partitioned it for extra storage space) and a 1 teribyte HDD sata 3 in the two sata 3 ports on my Gigabyte motherboard.   My Media drives are two 1.5 tb in a Raid 0 in the two Sata 2 slots but i don't think the "windows experience index" uses those in their test.

 

I was thinking of switching this in hopes of a better score and even better performace (even though I am pretty damn happy with the way it works now even with what windows experience index score of 5.9 is telling me)

 

I have a total of Two 120 Patriot Wildfire Sata 3 drives on hand.  I was thinking I should use them in the two Sata 3 ports on my Gigabyte mother board in a Raid 0 which should give me close to 240gig of system drive and a really fast rate of data transfer.   

 

All i am using this computer for is CS5.5 Production Suite and some web sites most all CMS websites these days (maybe a few games but I am not a big pc gamer)

 

What does everyone think?   If you think it is a good idea for me to switch to the two ssd in Raid 0.   I am wondering if I should reformat all the drives first?   I won't have to change anything on my media drive seeing that is on the Sata 2 part.  If anyone has done this before I would love to hear how you went about it. 

 

 

Oh and off the subject I documented the whole build and posted more than half of the videos on www.brentdolan.com   I am eventually going to come up with another name but can't think of any.  any suggestions?  

 

Thanks to everyone in advance.

Brent

www.brentdolanmedia.com

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 10:30 AM   in reply to alltenback

    Run the CS5 Benchmark http://ppbm5.com/ not the Windows utility

     

    Read SSD and Video Editing http://forums.adobe.com/thread/902915?tstart=0

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 10:36 AM   in reply to alltenback

    Brent,

     

    Regarding Intel SRT, don't use it at all if you are using one or more SSDs for your OS drive or array; it may even slow things down!? It is intended to help speed up HD based OS setups by putting certain files on the SSD.

     

    Regarding RAID 0 SSD for boot drive, most forum user's seem to value Premiere Pro editing speed, simplicity, bang-for-the-buck, and robustness and will just about all suggest not to even think about this. There are a few of us though that use our PCs for many other things and enjoy speed speed speed, myself included, and will tell you RAID 0 is great. So, I guess it is your call to decide what to do.

     

    Regarding Windows experience index numbers, I'd say just ignore them for drive speed. Truly, they are not very telling and other benchmarks and drive tests are much useful.

     

    Regards,

     

    Jim

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 11:27 AM   in reply to alltenback

    The WEI is utterly meaningless and useless. Forget about it. Systems with a score of 5.9 can perform 5 times better than systems with a 7.5 or higher score when editing.

     

    SSD's don't help editing performance, using SSD's in raid0 disable the trim function so they get extremely slow, partitioning is always a bad idea.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 3:16 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Harm Millaard wrote:

     

    The WEI is utterly meaningless and useless. Forget about it. Systems with a score of 5.9 can perform 5 times better than systems with a 7.5 or higher score when editing.

     

    And not only that, but a hard drive whose maximum sequential transfer speed is only 65 MB/s has a disk WEI score that's only 0.3 lower (WEI: 5.6) than a hard drive whose maximum sequential transfer speed is 140 MB/s (WEI: 5.9). As such, WEI is only good for separating a decisively substandard-performing system from one that'e even mediocre in performance.

     

    On the other hand, the graphics WEI scores do have some use: For nVidia GPUs, a graphics WEI score that's much lower than 7.5 means that slower-than-recommended performance in CS5.5, especially in MPEG-2 DVD encoding, is to be expected.

     
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