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CognizanCe1
Currently Being Moderated

Why are my videos being resized when exported?

Mar 14, 2012 7:55 AM

Hello all.

I am importing 1440x1080 .mts files into premiere pro.

I'm not doing any thing else to them. I simply wish to import them then export them as .avi files.

 

I go to file > export > Media.

In the "summary" section, it always shows output: 720x480, even though it shows the source sequence as 1440x1080.

 

For "Format" at the top of export settings, I choose "Microsoft AVI", or "uncompressed microsoft .avi"

 

If I check the "Match sequence settings" check box, it leaves the video at it's 1440x1080 resolution, but it squishes the video itself into 4:3 aspect ratio, distorting the image a lot.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 14, 2012 9:37 AM   in reply to CognizanCe1

    Operator error is the most likely cause here.  Learning how to use the program will likely solve that.

     

    FAQ: How do I choose the right sequence settings?

     

    FAQ: How do I get rid of black bars around my movie?

     

    FAQ: What are the best export settings?

     

    Premiere Pro FAQ list

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 14, 2012 10:02 AM   in reply to CognizanCe1

    If you are just wanting to convert to avi, try importing directly to adobe media encoder and export.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 14, 2012 11:05 AM   in reply to CognizanCe1

    It might help us to help you if you can share your intentions/workflow. There is very little reason to convert HDV to uncompressed avi for example. What is it that you ultimately wish to accomplish? Your video looks squished because HDV is anamorphic widescreen, using non-square pixels with an aspect of 1.33, multiply by 1440 and you get 1920. Export to 1920x1080 with 1.0 pixel aspect and it will look correct, but please tell us your goals and there may be better solutions.

     

    Thank you

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 14, 2012 2:54 PM   in reply to CognizanCe1

    You can use myriad Export settings, and many different CODEC's. The resizing came from choosing a DV Export Preset, which will be 720 x 480 for NTSC. Just do not choose one of the DV Presets, say MS AVI, and then select an applicable CODEC. The MS AVI Uncompressed should have been good, albeit with large file size, and I am not sure that it would be useful in YouTube.

     

    For YouTube, H.264 is not a bad CODEC, but you might want to experiment with WMV (are you on a Mac, or PC?)

     

    Jim Simon furnished a link to an Adobe FAQ Entry, on "Export Settings."

     

    Also, is your 1440 x 1080 Anamorphic with a PAR = 1.3333, or does it have square pixels, i.e. PAR = 1.0? The reason that I ask is your comment about "squished" in the output file.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 14, 2012 2:54 PM   in reply to CognizanCe1

    PP5.5 doesn't do a good job of de-interlacing, I'd use AE.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 15, 2012 6:17 AM   in reply to taz291819

    If you don't like the look of the H.264 output, then you didn't have the right settings. There should in fact be a YouTube HD preset available in Adobe Media Encoder, to encode to 720p using square pixels. With your 1440x1080 video, you'd be upscaling to go to 1920x1080, and that's kind of a big file for people to watch anyways. I think going down to 720p is ideal for YouTube, and this will fix the squishing issue you had as well.

     

    Encoding to an avi file will produce a very large file which is going to present an issue to upload, look under H.264 for the YouTube HD preset.

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

     
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