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Observations About CS6

Mar 30, 2012 1:33 PM

First, I have to say the the makeover of RAW is splendid! I am even going back to work I did in the 60's, converting to tiff where needed and opening RAW for some dynamite correction changes.

 

Now on to PS itself:

 

Layers: The makeover here leaves much to be desires in terms of visibility and interaction on screen. Take curves for instance. Compare the ease of use of the new, tiny dark boxes in Layers>Curves to the Curves in Edit>Adjustment>Curves. I can actually work with that presentation, which id what Layers>Curves used to look like in CS5. In fact, if this new version is written in stone, I will either revert to CS5 when building Layers or convert to Smart Object and use Edit. Converting to SO limits other tools from being available and isn't the smartest way to go.

 

I can say that in confidence for all the  Adjustment Layers. They are difficult to see because of the reverse presentation and size and cramped quarters with the additional Header. If you have to cramp up the presentation to give the latest and greatest, maybe it isn't so great.

 

Elsewhere I spoke out about Cropping issues and I have to include that here as well. If you are going to give classic mode, do the entire classic mode not just bits and pieces. The best part of the new mode is the fact that the image rotates when straightening out the Horizon. I will give that up for on screen usability any day.

 

As it stands, It looks like I'll have to do my ACR inCS6   then the rest in CS5. I don't know what backwards compatibility issues will result.

 

Visibility of the brushes in certain tonal ranges is still an issue. Why can't I see the circle in values like in certain cloud values? It slows process terribly to continually have to find it.

 

There are many steps to learn in using the advanced tools for which I am willing to learn. Adding complications as outlined above impacts the Gumption Factor, including the gumption to pony up for the update.

 

I'll have more to say as time goes on.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 2:00 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    60's? I'm not even going to try to figure out how that works.

     

    It sounds like you're not using the Properties Panel to good effect. It opens when you double click an adjustment layer and the panel is scalable so it's more flexible than the old interface and with the panel scaled up, I don't see any difference in the histogram presentation size.

     

    Tool visibility seems to be a perpetual Photoshop issue, but I don't find it any worse in CS6 than in other versions.

     

    Deke McClelland has a nice preview of all the features and how to use them efficiently if you have a subscription to Lynda.com.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 2:50 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    I don't go for the dark interface. It has poor icon contrast and all the darkness is depressing. ;-)

     

    Does this capture from my lighter interface setting look more usable?

     

    image_return.jpg

     

    Great photo, by the way!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 2:56 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    I agree with you 100% about the adjustment layers. I find the new set up very uncomfortable to use.

     

    1st: those little icons are hard to see (even if you get up close which I have to do since my monitor is a yard away) and even harder to recognize. It took me a while to realize that, as you hover, the icon's translation pops up. It doesn't get bigger or light up or change color. Selecting an adjustment from a clear and visible collection of icons should (and always was) something that didn't require one to stop, focus, think.

     

    2nd: the interfaces for all the individual adjustments has shrunken which requires extra effort each time you use them. Maybe it's not a big deal for slider based adjustments, but for curves, for example, making incremental and smooth adjustments requires more effort with less maneuvering room.

     

    3rd: there is a disconnect between the adjustment selection panel and the adjustment controls/mask controls panel (illogically named "Properties.")

     

    While some people could argue that this new arrangement is more aesthetically pleasing or more economical in its use of real estate, neither one of those considerations should override comfort, usability, or efficient workflow. Somethings, like relocated menus, options, and preferences are just a matter of getting used to them and going on. But this is something that affects workflow and is inconvenient and uncomfortable--and neither of those is likely to change with continued use.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 4:04 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    The image window background color is controlled via right-click (or cmd-click), the four interface color options are under Edit, Preferences, Interface. So you have separate controls for the working background and the interface.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 4:25 PM   in reply to BJN3

    I already forgot the secret keyboard control that I saw in one of Deke's tutorials. shift+F2 will lighten the interface in increments (on Mac depending on system prefs you may need to use shift+fn+F2). shift+F1 (with fn on the Mac if needed) increments darker. In the image background right click popup (ctrl+click not cmd+click as I misstated above), you can use the preset grays to black or set your own custom color.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 4:41 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Hudechrome wrote:

     

    Layers: The makeover here leaves much to be desires in terms of visibility and interaction on screen. Take curves for instance. Compare the ease of use of the new, tiny dark boxes in Layers>Curves to the Curves in Edit>Adjustment>Curves. I can actually work with that presentation, which id what Layers>Curves used to look like in CS5. In fact, if this new version is written in stone, I will either revert to CS5 when building Layers or convert to Smart Object and use Edit. Converting to SO limits other tools from being available and isn't the smartest way to go.

     

    Couple of things...you realize you CAN move the panel width to be larger and the Curves panel will grow to it's max size which is actually simiplar to the old model dlogs? And "dark" is the default but you can change it to look pretty much the same color/tone as CS5...

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 4:57 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    On interface "secrets" I agree, but Adobe has always been terrible with keyboard command documentation. The third-party "insiders" are usually the first place most of us hear about them.

     

    I have a card that supports Adobe's minimum Open GL specs. If you consider a new card I recommend a workstation class card like an Nvidia Quadro. The mainstream cards had so many driver issues because they're optimized for gaming that I finally decided to pay more to get essentially the same horsepower. But workstation graphics adapter drivers aren't updated every other day and they're very stable.

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
    5,880 posts
    May 24, 2010
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    Mar 30, 2012 6:34 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Just a thought, but with the CS6 properties, and CS5 Curves windows at a size that shows all the options without too much clutter, the size of the actual curve is identical from CS5 to CS6.  

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 10:30 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    No, it's not. It's OpenGL is the graphics rendering standard that Adobe hooks into for acceleration:

     

    http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/gpu-opengl-support-photoshop-cs4.h tml

     

    ATI makes good stuff, I don't care about brand wars. But I do know that workstation drivers are updated much less frequently and they're tested on productivity applications like CAD, video production, and image editing and that gaming performance doesn't lead workstation driver development. That's true for ATI and for Nvidia.

     

    Anyway, this has drifted off into the weeds. Good luck with the new tool and finding your rhythm. There are pluses and minuses. The much improved layer functions more than any complaints I have. ACR is much improved.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,480 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 31, 2012 7:32 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    As I understand it, Photoshop CS6 uses both OpenGL and OpenCL (which are two completely different things that can be used to leverage the power of the GPU). 

     

    • OpenGL is a library of functions for allowing programs to draw things using GPU functionality, and while it does some things very well, it has limitations.  Think 3D rendering, as as video games drawing 3D scenes might use, but that doesn't stop programs like Photoshop from using the facilities to draw 2D objects like images or using it to render 3D work.
    • OpenCL is a method for writing programs to run on the GPU in a standardized language.  You can see the obvious utility of doing this.

     

    Lawrence, go into Edit - Preferences - Performance.

     

    Assuming your [  ] Use Graphics Processor setting is set, Photoshop is using OpenGL.

     

    Now click the [ Advanced Settings... ] button.  Is the [  ] Use OpenCL option set?

     

    I'm concerned that you are saying OpenCL is unavailable with the Radeon HD 5670.  This is the same card I have, but I haven't been able to test it directly because I have only installed Photoshop CS6 on a virtual machine, not on my main workstation.  Aren't you doing likewise?  If that's the case, then the implementations of OpenGL and OpenCL Photoshop CS6 is using aren't directly related to the ATI card.  They're virtual.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,480 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Apr 1, 2012 10:11 AM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Just to be clear:

     

    Are you using a virtual machine to see these things, or are you running Windows 8 native on your hardware?

     

    If you're running a VM it's not an ATI/nVidia issue at all.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,480 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Apr 1, 2012 1:54 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Honestly, some of what you're saying doesn't make sense to me, but that's okay, it's not a problem.  No need to go into the VM discussion any further.

     

    What you're saying, then, if I have it straight is that running Windows 8 right on the hardware you're seeing Photoshop CS6 not allowing you to select the [  ] Use OpenCL option.

     

    This is a bit disturbing, but I don't suppose it's that much of a panic insofar as ATI hasn't released any "production" driver sets for Windows 8 yet.  It's all beta.  This may be a case of too many levels of beta limiting what you can do.

     

    I've been holding off installing Photoshop CS6 beta on my Windows 7 workstation (i.e., right on the hardware), and I have been very interested to hear whether OpenCL is available using production ATI drivers (Catalyst 12.3 in my case).

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,480 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 1, 2012 9:02 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    OpenCL is blocked because the installed software doesn't support it.  ATI definitely DOES support OpenCL in Windows 7 on these boards. 

     

    Do they even provide a full Catalyst package for Windows 8, or is it a display driver alone?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 2, 2012 9:11 AM   in reply to Hudechrome

    From what I've been able to decipher, Open  CL kicks in for the blur gallery functions. The pop up warning in the advanced tab in which I have it checked by default says "TURN THIS OFF IF THE BLUR GALLERY DOESN'T PERFORM AS EXPECTED."

     

    So far, my blur gallery experience seems to be functional--not impressive, but functional. (I'm sure it will improve somewhat once I get better at it, but I don't foresee much use.)

     
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