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Lower than 960px;

Mar 9, 2012 1:05 AM

This a site i made some time ago. Something that caught my attention is that given the amount of the content(left lolumn & main content) maybe

 

it is better if i reduce the overall width of the site which is now at 960px(so as to reduce white space).

 

So the question is:

 

Do you think that reducing even more the width(below 960px) is going to be bad from a design point of view?

 

I mean, can a site, with such a small width can be applealing(in terms of layout)?

 

Or is there a rule that states "never go under such a width..."?

 

I do not know, just asking and seeking your opinnion of making a site with the width of the measure described above.

 

Thanks.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 9, 2012 3:30 PM   in reply to JimVag1947

    Dimitris,

     

    You may consider a floating design where the total width is relative rather than fixed, 100%. You may have elements with relative widths adding up to 100%, or fixed width elements within the overall 100% relative width.

     

    Exactly how depends on which elements you decide to use.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 12, 2012 10:36 AM   in reply to JimVag1947

    Dimitris,

     

    Based on a (re)reading with more focus, I agree. I apologize for the more floating perception.

     

    In my opinion, a site that is narrower than the screen looks best if centred (horizontally so there is an equal amount of space on either side).

     

    Ok, suppose i use a float design(100% etc),at some point due to the folating nature of the site, the overall widht might fall below 900px.

     

    Indeed, but only when viewed on a screen (available portion) narrower than 900px.

     
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  • Liam Dilley
    6,694 posts
    Feb 28, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2012 2:26 PM   in reply to JimVag1947

    Responsive and Adaptive Webdesign is what web designers should be implementing, exploring and working with.

     

    http://www.lullabot.com/articles/responsive-adaptive-web-design

     

    You can see a great example in the new Smashing Magazine website here:
    http://www.smashingmagazine.com/

     

    Check that out on the ipad or iphone or just scale the browser window down.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 1, 2012 1:22 PM   in reply to Liam Dilley

    Smashing Magazine is a WordPress site.  Not that there's anything wrong with that...

     

    Nancy O.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 2, 2012 10:44 AM   in reply to JimVag1947

    If you're building the site for yourself and you like to use Dreamweaver, you probably don't need a CMS site.

     

    CMS is good for clients who can't use Dreamweaver but want to be able to update their site themselves.

     

    CMS is also ideal for  groups in collaborative settings where multiple contributors can log-in and add/edit content.

     

    Which CMS you use depends on a) your coding skills, b) budget, c) features needed.

     

     

     

    Nancy O.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 3, 2012 6:19 AM   in reply to JimVag1947

    JimVag1947 wrote:

     

    ...Nancy mentioned that smashingmagazine is wordpress...

    Further, Lullabot is a Drupal site. CMS is taking over.

     

    I don't know what type of site you are making but a database-driven site are the only sites that I visit anymore. I cannot name a single static site that is of use to me. Along with the different technology, there is also a different mindset for the web author. An easily edited CMS often has more active/fresher content.

     

    To get back on topic but still discuss CMS...

    JimVag1947 wrote:

     

    ...the site which is now at 960px(so as to reduce white space)...

    A CMS relies on templates/themes to make redesign so much easier. We initially separated content from style by introducing CSS. We can further that separation by separating that content in a CMS database. That separation makes it easier to create multiple designs for various screen displays. You can use the same content to design right now for a 480px mobile device, a standard 960px desktop, and a higher desktop resolution to be standard in a few years.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 9, 2012 6:14 AM   in reply to JimVag1947

    I think that you might be confusing something. You are completely free to modify an open source, open licensed CMS. Open source is what gives you complete freedom.

     

    Open source allows you to build on the knowledge and experience of many others. You will not need to reinvent the wheel. Creating your own CMS requires a lot more effort. Inexperienced developers will likely leave a lot more security holes than their open source counterparts.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2012 10:24 AM   in reply to JimVag1947

    JimVag1947,

    Before you decide to build a CMS yourself, have a look at these links.  With these products, you're not locked into anything you don't need.

     

    Get Simple CMS - (open source)

    PHP, no database required.

    http://get-simple.info/

     

    Perch - (commercial)

    Requires PHP & MySql

    http://grabaperch.com/

     

    e107 CMS - (open source)

    Requires PHP & MySql

    http://e107.org/

     

    Content Seed - (commercial)

    Available in ASP or PHP, no database required. 

    http://contentseed.com/

     

    WebAssist Power CMS (commercial extension for Dreamweaver)

    Requires PHP & MySql

    http://www.webassist.com/dreamweaver-extensions/powercms-builder/

     

    Concrete5 CMS - (open source)

    Requires PHP & MySql

    http://www.concrete5.org/

     

     

     

    Nancy O.

    Alt-Web Design & Publishing

    Web | Graphics | Print | Media  Specialists 

    http://alt-web.com/

     
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