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How to use .MKV and .ISO with Premiere Pro? They are not supported.

Apr 6, 2012 7:27 AM

Tags: #cs5 #premiere #iso #mkv

Hi all. My brother in-law sent us two .mkv videos and a DVD .iso he wants me to use in a video I am cutting for him. The only trouble is, I've no idea how to get them into a format PremPro can handle.

 

I've searched and the only solutions I have found are infinitely complicated for me. Avisynth is certainly beyond me.

 

Anyone know of a way to convert .mkv (info lists 942x720 H.264 4:2:0 YUV MPEG4 AVC) into something useable?

 

Same question for an ISO file.

 

Thanks much

 

By the way, this is not for anything 'important' nor am I getting paid, so I have no budget tp purchase software. I am sure there must be a free solution.

 

I tried this trial version software...

 

http://www.moyea.com/import-flv/

 

But it would NOT install. It just errored in a loop and was unable to find or understand I have CS5 PremPro.

Branched to a new discussion.
 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 6, 2012 7:42 AM   in reply to msp1518

    For the .ISO first burn it to disk and then copy the .VOB files to your hard disk and import those into your project. Notice this will only work if the .ISO is FULLY DVD compliant. If not, then you have to figure out your own approach. For the Matroska files, I haven't the faintest idea.

     

    The best approach however is to ask your brother in law for the source material, since Matroska and ISO are not meant to be edited.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 6, 2012 9:13 AM   in reply to msp1518

    No need to burn the iso to disk. Extract with winzip or winrar.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 6, 2012 9:33 AM   in reply to msp1518

    Try with PowerISO

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 2:47 AM   in reply to msp1518

    Use VLC to transcode (no audio or video recompression) MKV to TS and that will import in CS5.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2012 9:55 AM   in reply to DeeJay Lyon

    Off-topic replys branched and moved.  Use the link at the top of this thread.  Or this one:

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/message/4360196#4360196

     

    Jeff

     

    EDIT:  EuroSiti did offer this workaround for the OP:

     

    Here's a workaround:

    Use the freeware tool Avidemux to extract the H.264 AVC video stream from the MKV container.

    Hopefully Premiere Pro will let you import that H.264 video file. Edit it and export it as a video stream again afterwards.

    Then remux the H.264 stream with MKVmerge (also free). Open the original MKV file in MKVmerge and replace the old video stream with your edited version.

    That way you may be able to preserve the advanced indexing and multiple audio+subtitle tracks in the Matroska file.

     

    Good luck.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 11:38 AM   in reply to msp1518

    ADAPTER from Macroplant should solve this problem for anyone editing with an MKV (Matroska) file. It's extensive file support will help you convert to mp4, mov, or avi. This is good for both Mac and PC. Plus its FREE.

     

    try it: http://www.macroplant.com/adapter/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 7, 2013 4:32 AM   in reply to josuemolina

    Does Adapter have a Direct Stream Copy option?

    That way you don't have to actually convert the video & audio streams ( = quality loss). There is no reason to convert the actual streams.

    The video has most likely already been MPEG4/H264 compressed when the MKV file was created.

    A really good conversion tool will allow you to simply change the file container without transcoding the audio & video streams again - plus it saves quite a lot of time if it's a long video.

     

    TEncoder has this feature - and it's also free.

     

    But of course: You still have to bear in mind that the MP4 container is much more restrictive than the Matroska container, so you might be forced to convert anyway.

    Lack of MKV support is usually an indication of commercial arrogance.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 7, 2013 3:47 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    Lack of MKV support is usually an indication of commercial arrogance.

     

    Not again...

    Homer.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 9, 2013 11:01 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    :-)

    Personally I think it's fair to say something like that every time others claim that "there's no need for MKV support"... But I shall stick to talking about Direct Stream Copy vs. transcoding for now.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 21, 2013 9:15 AM   in reply to msp1518

    I've never gotten it to work myself, and use other programs.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 5, 2013 3:13 PM   in reply to msp1518

    Why is it so important to use VLC for transcoding?

    And why are you whining about not being able to find MKV stream editors for Windows? There are several of them - and unlike the MacOS ones they are completely free.

     

    You can do it in no time with MKVcleaver (you could install MKVtoolnix first). And unlike tsMuxer it won't complain about B-frame content etc.

     

    MKVcleaver will demux the "stupid" Matroska file and give you:

    - A lossless .H264 video stream file

    - An equally lossless soundtrack file (or more)

    - Timecode TXT files

    - Subtitle files

     

    I suggest you simply use MKVcleaver or MKVtoolnix to remux the MKV with the audio track you want to add. It's up to you whether you want to keep the original audio in the MKV file.

     

    Personally I would stick with the MKV file. But you can use Handbrake, Freemake + Burnaware to burn the audio-improved MKV file straight back to an M2TS file / Blu-ray disc if you like.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 7, 2013 6:14 PM   in reply to msp1518

    I know this is an older thread but the issue still persists: How to import an .mkv into Premiere Pro?

     

    Short answer - as far as I can tell - you can't.

     

    But you can simply use a free tool called tsMuxeR

     

    In tsMuxeR - click 'Add' to choose your .mkv file, then click 'Start muxing'.

     

    That will output the stream as a.ts file and Premier Pro will be able to handle it just fine.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 14, 2013 4:21 PM   in reply to TheWallyDee

    Or XMedia Recode (free and it doesn't contain any ad/crapware).

     

    In addition to

    - direct streamcopy features for both audio and video tracks, I also found out it has

    - some of the best metadata/tag editing features

    - and you can create/edit chapters within the (MKV or MP4 file) if need be

    - or add additional subtitles

    - And it has a simple non-linear visual editing option

    - and the same advanced video quality adjustment filters that Handbrake has

    - ... and it has an amazing list of hardware specific output presets.

     

    Regardless of your preferred format (either lossless editing or end user formats), XMedia Recode is the best new video editing tool I've come across in 2013. It has been around for several years, but now it runs like a charm - at least on all my Windows 64-bit systems.

     

    So in short: Use this tool to extract a video (and audio) streams that you want to edit in PP. When you're done, join the edited bits back together in an MKV container, and finalize the whole thing by adding chapter info and optional extra audio tracks or subtitles with this little tool.

     

    Message was edited by: EuroSiti

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 14, 2013 5:12 PM   in reply to EuroSiti

    I use XMedia Recode myself to create Firefox friendly HTML5 videos.  No problems to report with that installed on the edit system.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 10, 2013 12:20 AM   in reply to msp1518

    yes, I use the same method to edit mkv video with Premiere Pro, but I not user VLP Player, I use FreeMake to transcode MKV video to Premiere Pro. it also completely free and works well on my computer.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 18, 2013 9:25 AM   in reply to raysmithew

    I also use Freemake Video Converter a lot, because it has some extraordinarily fast transcoding features that also makes use of your video card memory. As long as you carefully deselect all the toolbar junk that comes with the installer, you should be safe.

     

    But if you are really picky and want to change video containers without transcoding (in other words: stream copy), or if you want to add metadata to your file, XMedia Recode is a great tool.

     

    For pure storage purposes, I use:

    - MakeMKV for lossles DVD/Blu-ray backups.

    - Handbrake or XMedia Recode for editing/downsizing video files without metadata loss.

    - Exact Audio Copy (EAC) for lossless CD backups & metadata additions.

    - Audacity for sound file editing & metadata additions.

     

    The next big thing will be H.265 (HEVC) and VP9 video encoding, of course. There should be a quality&size benefit even for non-HD content.

     
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