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Currently Being Moderated

We're probably screwed, but I'll ask.

Apr 8, 2012 1:02 AM

Tags: #cs

Through our own stupidity (well that of a co-worker, but me for tasking him with this... but I digress) While he was working on "201203 March Project.prproj" (going back and pulling some stuff from it), he mistakenly saved it over 201204 April Project.prproj.  He went file, save as and saved it over the top.  He had March's project saved as April's project and open long enough that it overwrote all of the autosaves of the april project. 

 

So, I have to ask, has anyone encountered this and has some amazingly ingenious way to save our bacon?  It represents 20-25+ hours of work this week, but I'm pretty much at a loss for any way to recover the original files or auto saves.  So yes, I'm hoping for a merical on Easter.  Thanks for anyone that can help, if you can.

 

I am running:

Premiere Pro CS5

Windows 7 Professional x64

i7 930

12.0 GB RAM

 

In case any of it matters (The fact I'm running windows might).

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 1:33 AM   in reply to blazer003

    Unfortunately no Easter eggs for you this year. If all the auto save files were overwritten too as you said, and you don't have another backup from your original project, you're screwed.

     

    For the future, use a Save for the normal work, but also add a Save As with a different name to protect yourself from these mishaps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 2:05 AM   in reply to blazer003

    My condolences. Also, increase the number of auto-save backups in preferences, it hardly takes any space and may prevent these situations. I set the number in my work place's autosave prefs to 240.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 3:34 AM   in reply to blazer003

    There is an option called Save a Copy

    I use that everytime I have an important project.

    This copy is saved to a different drive and does not get overwritten.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 8:15 AM   in reply to blazer003

    Without a backup, or useful AutoSaves, all is lost.

     

    As has been stated, there are types of "Saves," and each has its use. This ARTICLE goes into more detail, and might be useful in the future. Unfortunately, that will only be helpful "next time."

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 9:46 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    I think many of os can learn from this, although it is such a shame for you guys :(

     

    Thanks for the info on 'save a copy' Ann, I'm syrely going to try that out.

     

    Ulf

     
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  • joe bloe premiere
    4,391 posts
    Dec 6, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 10:41 AM   in reply to blazer003

    At the end of every day's work I always save incrementally dated duplicates

    of my Premiere, After Effects and Encore projects to a separate internal drive.

     

    This habit was born years ago from losing a project file to a RAID0 failure,

    but I continue to save and archive to DVD all of these backup project files

    just in case I get a read failure from a particular project's archive disk.

     

    It usually only takes losing one project to work out your own 'fail-safe' method,

    but I have not lost a project or element since I started this practice.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 10:52 AM   in reply to joe bloe premiere

    This is a proces that we nearly all learned the hard way.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2012 12:28 PM   in reply to blazer003

    Have you tried the document versions? http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Previous-versions-of-files -frequently-asked-questions

     

    If you go back to the date before the saving error, you may be lucky. I have used this feature before. My recollection is vague but the process when something like: right click on the file and the versions info comes up under properties, I think. The last time I used this was in my former workplace under Vista. I hope this helps.

     

    I will temper this with the fact that I am predoimnantly a Mac User so my recent knowledge of Windows is not superb.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 9, 2012 7:08 AM   in reply to blazer003

    This is a long shot, but have you tried a data recovery utility?  Just because you overwrote a certain file, that doesn't necessarily mean it was deleted from your disk.  When you "trash" or overwrite a file on a disk, really what's happening is that you're telling your file management system (OS) is that the physical location on your drive is available for re-use.  The new file may be written into an entirely different location, expecially if it's larger, b/c the OS prefers a contiguous stripe, if one's available.

     

    The sooner you run a data recovery utility after you've noticed your mistake, the better chance you have of recovring the "lost" data.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 9, 2012 7:19 AM   in reply to Jim Curtis

    Jim,

     

    That is a good idea. For other reasons, I have had good luck with the Stellar-Phoenix "recovery suite," and also a less expensive utility, Recover My Files.

     

    I do agree - the sooner, the better.

     

    My be a big help to the OP.

     

    Hunt

     
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