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Building and economical editing rig with Z68/Z77 chipset, Intel QuickSync, LucidLogic and Cuda Cores

Apr 12, 2012 2:23 PM

Tags: #video #cuda #quick #synch #premiere_cs5.5 #lucidlogic_virtu

Greetings all. I've been trolling the forums for a few days now and suprisingly (I think) haven't come accross any discussion about the Intel Quick Synch technology and LucidLogic Virtu software available in the Z68 and newly available Z77 Intel chipset motherboards with respect to editing in Premiere Pro.  The Intel Quick Synch technology, as I understand it, is all about accelerating video compression & decompression, etc.- though I've not used it yet. The LucidLogic Virtu software is supposed to allow the combination of Intel's Quick Synch along with a discrete graphics card (e.g. nVidia chipset with cuda cores enabled in MPE).  My understanding and experience of Cuda Cores (I currently have them working in Pre-Pro 5.5 using a 460GTX chip and a successfull hack) is that when MPE is enabled, rendering and pIayback is greatly speed enhanced, though I believe the MPE engine gives only limited assistance and speed to much of the conversions, compression and exporting (which is a great deal of day to day editing experience) while Quick Synch is supposed to make a real difference here. Now I do not suppose Intel or the MB manufacturers have thought that the LucidLogic Virtu software be compatible with Premiere Pro and MPE hardware, but I figure it can't hurt to ask..

 

Editing needs: Some SD (basic DV), HD, 720/60p and some 1080i/p. (cameras Canon 7D video / Panasonic AVCCAM 1080/30p) MPEG4, H264 codecs, etc.

 

A motherboard which I moght consider would be, for instance, a new Asus P8Z77-V Pro or similar. http://usa.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z77V_PRO/ depending on add-in slots needed (Pci-e and/or PCI)

CPU: Intel 2700K,  memory to match with some overclocking expected,

 

Of course I could go on, but this is the basic thought. Any thoughts or copmments are surely welcome. Thanks in advance

 

Doug A

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 12, 2012 7:53 PM   in reply to Doug-bedfoto

    Do not get an i7-2700K, wait till the end of the month and get an i7-3770K.  This in your Motherboard will give you PCIe v3.0 for one major advantage.

     
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    Apr 15, 2012 11:54 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Quick Sync takes a ‘black box’ approach which doesn’t give applications that utilise it via its API much control over its parameters so it’s aimed more at home users than professionals. This may change over time but I’m not aware if the API will be extended when the i7-3770K (Ivy Bridge) is released. Ivy Bridge has improved hardware performance for Quick Sync which generally seems to be tuned for performance rather than visual quality or flexibility. 

     

    “Do not get an i7-2700K, wait till the end of the month and get an i7-3770K.  This in your Motherboard will give you PCIe v3.0 for one major advantage.” Bill Gehrke

     

    Bill, are there any benchmarks showing that PCIe 3 offers real world gains with the MPE?

     

    Be aware that if you already have a Z68 board that only some of them support PCIe 3 regardless of which CPU you use. Even though the PCIe controller is on the CPU the board has to have compliant PCIe circuitry; traces etc.

     
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    Apr 15, 2012 1:02 PM   in reply to eclipse_crow

    Gehrke

     

    Bill, are there any benchmarks showing that PCIe 3 offers real world gains with the MPE?

     

    Be aware that if you already have a Z68 board that only some of them support PCIe 3 regardless of which CPU you use. Even though the PCIe controller is on the CPU the board has to have compliant PCIe circuitry; traces etc.

    I do not know of any yet that are applicable to Premiere.  And I do know that my Z68 Gigabyte board is PCIe 3.0 compatible--when I get my hands on a CPU that has the built in features, and that requires a 1155 pin Ivy Bridge CPU, i. e an i7-3770.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 16, 2012 6:25 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Actually, early benchmarks indicate that you may be in for somewhat of a disappointment with IB and Z77.

     

    The IB CPUs (at least in their initially released stepping) will not overclock nearly as high as the SB chips because the IB chips get very hot at even moderate overclocks. In fact, Intel is releasing the IB CPUs with a TDP of 95W (same as SB) instead of the originally promised 77W.

     

    Second, some early benchmarks showed that the average Z77 board is a bit slower (performance-wise) than its Z68 counterpart.

     
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