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Turning a textured portrait into a non textured photograph

Mar 10, 2012 1:13 PM

Tags: #cs5 #windows #images #portraits #textured
  Latest reply: Chris Cox, Dec 22, 2012 6:23 PM
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  • Pierre Courtejoie
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    Jan 11, 2006
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    Mar 13, 2012 1:45 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Sorry if it sounded like I was chewing you. It was not my intention at all, but I wanted to direct you to the correct procedure, that you already followed. From your explanation it sounded like you moved, and not the original photo, and the fact that the bubbles are illuminated in the same spot seemed to corellate it. Noel might be on something with the fact that the edges might be worn on the same side...

     

    Good work, Noel!

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 13, 2012 4:20 PM   in reply to Darlie B

    I think you're going to be happy. 

     

    I was able to do a pretty good job of pattern removal.  I'm uploading the big PSD file now, and will eMail you with the link when it's done.

     

    This is a downsized (25%) before/after example of the result:

     

    BeforePatternRemovalExample.jpg

     

    AfterPatternRemovalExample.jpg

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 13, 2012 5:01 PM   in reply to Darlie B

    You're welcome.

     

    I started with the 4 raw files you sent, and combined them - which was a bit more of a challenge than I had thought it would be because you shot them at some pretty different angles.

     

    The basic technique once I got the composite image, to get rid of the pattern was to duplicate the image, do a Filter - Other - High Pass, invert the result, then mix it with the original using Overlay blending.  But that doesn't fix it all in one shot.   I went into significantly more steps, and actually combined 3 adjacent "bubble cells" to make the High Pass output more clean and consistent from "bubble" to "bubble".  Also, I adjusted the result with Levels, and actually iterated the entire process 3 times, as each successive "Low Pass" operation left some high frequency artifacts.

     

    The overall result was less "bubbly", but had quite a bit of banding remaining, owing to the tops of the "bubbles" being lighter overall than the bottoms, so I employed my Horizontal Banding Noise Reduction filter that's part of one of my commercial actions sets, and that really tidied up the remaining banding.

     

    To color the burned-out spots on her face I just sampled some nearby skin color, then set up a fuzzy-edged brush to do Color blending at partial opacity and painted over them.

     

    I did a lot of spot removal with the Spot Healing Brush set to Content Aware.

     

    Lastly, I'm happy to report I edited for hours and hours straight, using a lot of gee whiz Photoshop features on a multilayer 20+ megapixel image without a single Photoshop glitch or failure, which really proved out the quality of the ATI Catalyst 12.3 display drivers I recently downloaded.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Mar 13, 2012 6:07 PM   in reply to Darlie B

    Don't worry about it being "sloppy"; what you shot made fine input for what I needed - it was nice and sharp.  Photoshop did most of the alignment work.  I just had to tweak it a bit.  It turns out the little "bubbles" made it easier to achieve near perfect pixel alignment between the four exposures.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Apr 14, 2012 7:31 PM   in reply to Darlie B

    Very slick to see how you were able to use the result.  You're welcome and thanks for following up.  Glad it all worked out and your friend is happy!

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 22, 2012 3:18 PM   in reply to Darlie B

    I realize that I'm rather late to this discussion, but found it researching 64-bit FFT filters.

    First of all, outstanding job, and suggestions by everyone! About 20 years ago, I had a commercial film photography studio and darkroom, and used to shoot lots of 4"x5" transparencies for oil painters on canvas, to be used for reproduction. I used two studio strobes with vertical polarizing filters on them, and then had a horizontally positioned filter on the camera. This would eliminate ALL reflections from the lighting on the shiny paint and canvas. Understand, this was done pre-digital, and circular polarizers are preferred to linear polarizers now, due to metering and autofocus issues, but apparently would still probably work on a DSLR with a little experimentation.

    There was another trick I learned to illuminate the inside of a cylinder evenly, which is to place a sheet of glass at a 45 degree angle right over the (object/artwork,) illuminate it from the side, and shoot it from the top. This puts (a percentage) of your lighting on the same exact axis with the camera.

    On a third note, it's entirely possible that the paper was textured before the emulsion was applied, depositing more emulsion in the low areas, causing them to be darker. At any rate, I doubt there's anthing you could do that would look better than what you have now. Hopefully, my tips may help someone with a project in the future.

     

    ~Jamie

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 23, 2006
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    Dec 22, 2012 5:09 PM   in reply to LightByter

    Thanks for your contribution, Jamie.  I like the idea of using the 45 degree glass to directly illuminate the subject.  A friend of mine has a circular flash that fits around lenses to do direct lighting (especially useful for macros)..

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 22, 2012 6:23 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    A ring flash would actually make these texture reflections worse...

     
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