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What is the difference between After Effects and Premiere Pro?

Apr 15, 2012 6:19 PM

Tags: #after_effects_cs5.5 #premiere_pro_5.5

(note; Cross posted in other applicable forums)

Ok, that is the gist of my question, now for the clarification and reasons behind it.

Imagine for a minute that there is a person who has heard of all these wonderful products and wants to work with them to possibly change careers. Now imagine this person is a noob and has only a bit of creativity, a sprinkling of imagination, and absolutely no experience whatsoever in anything resembling a professional graphic arts, media, etc career except for some dabbling around with oil paints, watercolor, pastels, acrylics, and occasionally charcoal.

Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on your persepctive I do work on computers so those basics are covered. So now you understand my absolute lack of knowledge.

I have been checking and finally bought Production Premium thinking I may be able to express something in Flash. The problem I am having is (other than an outdated computer) what is the real difference between the two programs I asked about? There seems to be some overlapping in their functions. Sort of a different route to accomplish the same thing. I've read the blurbs on the website and both sound very similar to my uneducated ears (eyes? mixed simile alert).

 

If someone could kindly explain to me the reasons to use either of the two products and what they can do differently I would greatly appreciate it. I purchased CS5.5 Production Premium and currently have it loaded on my laptop before I install 64 bit Windows on the desktop (both at 32 bit at this time) so I currently have the trial on the laptop. I understand the differences between Illustrator and photoshop  but these two are confounding. Also I do understand the differences between 32 bit After Effects/Premier Pro and 64 bit seems to be the spiffy Mercury Playback Engine. (a quick thank you to Adobe for including the 32 bit CS4 versions of those programs for luddites such as I!).

 

I await your wisdom.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 15, 2012 7:25 PM   in reply to viridianidea

    Premiere Pro is a video editing solution.

     

    After Effects is a video compositing solution.

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compositing

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_editing

     
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    Apr 16, 2012 10:24 AM   in reply to viridianidea

    my absolute lack of knowledge.

     

    This isn't quite the best place to resolve such an absolute lack of knowledge.  It's more of a place to fill in small gaps in knowlege.

     

    To correct such an absolute lack, I very strongly recommend a formal education first.

     
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    Apr 16, 2012 10:58 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

     

    To correct such an absolute lack, I very strongly recommend a formal education first.

     

    Jim, maybe you should leave out the word 'formal'. There are many around here without a 'formal' education, but who have come to grasps with the basics of editing and I count myself among them (sh*t, do I have such an inflated ego?). Of course you can argue I'm an utter nitwit, since I am an autodidact and thus had an idiot for a teacher, being a self educated person without 'formal' education in video editing (I have a masters degree in economics, but that does not count at all here) but hey, I think I can get by with some elementary basics. Of course, when things get difficult, I hope I can get people like yourself with a formal education to help me and not shove me off by saying get a 'formal' education first.

     
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    Apr 17, 2012 6:36 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    I have a formal bachelor's degree education in production (broadcast journalism, focus in telecommunications). I can safely say that as good as my instructors all were, I only learned about 10% of my production knowlege (including editing) during my formal training. The rest has come from constant execution, working alongside others and Google. My instructors truly were experts...major broadcast news veterans and Hollywood-trained DP's and scriptwriters. I never felt cheated or shortchanged by my formal education, but I understood almost implicitly that in order to get anywhere I was going to need to do more than simply graduate with high honors....I needed to keep asking questions the rest of my life, keep seeking support and knowlege from others. This forum, though specialized to a particular product, is nothing short of that exchange of knowlege that is required as a follow-up course by even the most thorough completion of a collegiate degree.

     

    So anyway, +1 Harm.

     

    To the OP, shooternz has the best answers for you posted already. Main thing you need to avoid is assuming that since both applications can ingest video and put it on a timeline that they are both editing video. After Effects is specialized in frame compositing, and as such, it is most likely one of the worst long-form video editing applications that you could use (as it is, of course, not a video editor at all). After Effects must render every frame it plays more or less, which you can imagine gets rather difficult on a 20 minute television program with 40,000+ frames of video in many cases. Rather, After Effects best helps with general effects and compositing (think green screen work), motion graphics for short animations (think about a corporate logo animation at the beginning of a feature), motion tracking (putting a shot of a news report inside a television screen on a set and making it look like the actors are actually watching it while the camera dollies left to right behind them).

     

    Premiere is where everything finally comes together. You can do much effects work in Premiere Pro, and some fairly complex motion graphics and title animations, but it's not specialized to that. Likewise, you can do a LOT of audio editing inside PPro, but you're better off using Audition for very specialized audio edits (or Pro Tools if you prefer) because Audition lets you view audio in different ways, apply more advanced audio effects, etc.

     

    Good luck!

     
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    Apr 17, 2012 7:11 AM   in reply to Christian Jolly

    I totally agree that"formal" education in a subject only gets us so far. Working on the job teaches us what we need to know for our own peculiar needs. And in my own case I never came close to fully understanding a subject until I actually tried to teach it, and sometimes not even then.

     

    Christian Jolly wrote:

     

    I can safely say that as good as my instructors all were, I only learned about 10% of my production knowlege

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2012 5:57 PM   in reply to viridianidea

    Start here to learn Premiere Pro: http://adobe.ly/psbYc4

     

    Start here to learn After Effects: http://adobe.ly/bjBT3P

     
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