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Dip to white transition causes video to jerk slightly when it starts/ends

Apr 22, 2012 11:15 AM

  • What version of Premiere Pro? Include the minor version number 5.5.0
  • What operating system? Win 7 64 bit
  • What kind(s) of source footage? h.264/Quicktime 1.0 PAR
  • Tell us about your computer hardware.Intel i5 2500k
  • Are you using Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration? Yes
  • Does the problem only happen with your final output, with previews, or both? Both

 

Whenever I use a dip to white, the video that it dips from nudges downwards a few pixels, then nudges back up when the transition comlpetes. It's slight but very noticable. THis is 1280x720 footage in a 4:3 timeline (for broadcast on a local network). THis happens in the preview and in the finished product. Would love to find an answer to this one.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 11:56 AM   in reply to VidNoob

    Update to 5.5.2.

    Use a 16:9 preset.

    Meager CPU.

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 12:23 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    Have you tried flipping your H264 file to something else. It might just be me, but I think of H264 as a transitional codec. Its so highly compressed it can cause problems in NLE's across the board.

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 12:47 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    There are a lot of under-the-hood updates/bug corrections in 5.5.2 that may not be explicitly mentioned  in the changelog.

     

    1280 x 720 with square PAR is 16 x 9. It has nothing to do with your export format.

     

    The meager CPU may cause problems, especially if your disk setup or memory is lacking as well.

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 2:54 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    Is there a better codec they should be exporting to for delivery to me?

     

    Have them give you the original camera media, not something "exported".

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 2:55 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    I was udner the impression i should be editing in a sequence supporting the settings I'm going to be exporting out to

     

    Generally, no.  You want your sequence to match your footage, then you can change that to suit your export needs when you actually export.

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 2:55 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    Check the delivery specs from the broadcaster.

     

    Even though it may be an SD (4:3) broadcast...it may be from  Full Height Anamorphic media  (FHA). 

     

    These are produced from 16:9 files.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 2:56 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    then there's no way for me to edit the film properly taking into consideration framing and title safe areas.

     

    You won't need to worry about that.  16:9 export out as 4:3 will be letterboxed.  Everything will still show.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 3:17 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    The people doing the filming are doing the rough edits then giving that to me to edit.

     

    If they're using PP for the rough cut, have them give you the original media along with the PP project file.  Then you can open that rough cut project and do the finishing.

     

    If they're using Final Cut Pro or Avid, there are ways to open those projects in PP as well.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 4:21 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    Would you care to explain how that sort of workflow would go? Let me give you a bit of detail on how my entire workflow is going here and maybe you can point me to the roadbumps that could be smoothed out. The people doing the filming are doing the rough edits then giving that to me to edit. I don't know what type of camera or media they are shooting with, i have only been looking at the properties of the footage I get (h.264/Quicktime 1.0 PAR). Now then the other thing I'd like to know is how if I'm editing in a 16:9 sequence I can see 4:3 output int he program panel so I know wheremy margins are.

     

    O.K....Roadbumps from what I can see are:

     

    1. You dont know the broadcast delivery spec.  Thats essential to know.

     

    2. The people filming are doing "rough edits" and then you are taking over.  Complicated and messy workflow IMHO

     

    Are you working with the original media?

     

    You can drop 16:9 footage into an SD sequence if you choose but you will have to accept bars top and bottom or centre extraction composition....as well as down rezzing in Premiere. Of course that makes it easy to use the Safe areas.

     

    If they want SD FHA you work with an HD sequence and you output to tape or file squeezed.

     

    Different broadcasters have different specs.

     

    They may simply want SD.  You need to ask as that determines how you proceed from here.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 4:31 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    DVD delivery is a pretty basic BC spec so I would work in an SD sequence for that.

     

    The viewers with 16:9 TVs will have to suffer pillar box bars left and right.

     

    Your option is to edit in HD and allow Encore to downrez to SD ...but you would have to ask the BC if that works for them and the veiwers.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 7:35 PM   in reply to VidNoob

    they are actually using imovie

     

    That smacks of amateur.  I'd try and convince them to skip that step and let the pro (you) do it all.  Have them give you the unedited original media.  You'll get a better quality end result.

     
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