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Tiffany Upshaw
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Apr 19, 2012 10:04 PM

Hello! My name is Tiffany Upshaw. I am currently a cinematography student and am asspirting to be an editor once I graduate.

 

When I edit I always turn to Adobe. So I thought it would be smart to join the forum for it.

 

I just got back from NAB and am very excited to try out CS6, which should be very soon hopefully. A couple of my friends and I entered the LightIron REDuser 4k competion and got 2nd place. One of the prices was CS6. So I'm excited for that to come in and test it out. When I went to Adobe's booth at NAB it had a lot of interesting new stuff!

 

Well, I just wanted to introduce myself to everyone and say hello I hope to talk to you all!

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 19, 2012 10:25 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Welcome to the asylum Tiffany.

     

     

    Well done on scoring a nice prize as well.

     

    Can you show us what you did to win it?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2012 4:14 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Nice bit of work!

     

    Welcome to the forum...good place to pick up some tips and tricks.

     
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    Apr 20, 2012 8:01 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Very nice work - and welcome :)

     

    Ulf

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2012 8:03 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Tiffany,

     

    Welcome and congratulations!

     

    Now sure how the main PrPro forums might get restructured, upon the release of CS 6, so you might want to watch, to see what the MOD's decide.

     

    As you have no doubt seen, and already done, the Video Lounge is a great place for non-technical discussions, or discussions of non-Adobe-products. For technical, Adobe-specific posts, the appropriate product forum (for now, CS 5/5.5, and probably soon CS 6) is perfect.

     

    Good luck, and thanks for sharing your award, plus the link to the piece.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2012 8:38 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Stephen F. Austin State University.

     

    They have a college named after the Six Million Dollar Man?

     

    That's cool.

     
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    Apr 20, 2012 9:09 AM   in reply to Jim Simon
     
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    Apr 20, 2012 8:41 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Tiffany,

     

    That is cool, that Stephen F. Austin U has a cinematography school. Way, way back, when I was in film school (LSU/LSU-NOLA), U Texas was the biggie in Texas. Now, that was in the early 70's, so much has obviously changed. We got to hear a lot about U Texas, since two professors had just gotten their masters there, and one her PhD. Until then, I only thought about USC, UCLA, Pratt, Art Center School of Design, and Rochester. Hearing about how good U Texas was, right from the professors' mouths, sort of moved things from a Coast, to at least near by, and that they were bringing the programs to New Orleans, was a big plus for us, the students.

     

    Everything (or nearly so) was still being done with film, as video was either a direct-feed to a switcher for on-air, from the studio, or to 2" tape, that was heck to edit. There were no sync'ed deck to deck editing yet, and the term ENG was still years in the future. One used an Imicon tube video camera, IN studio, or it had to be done on film. Also, back then, "video" was an "ugly word," predicated on what the product looked like. It was not until 30 years later, that I could even look at video, and not feel a bit ill. Wow, how things have changed.

     

    Nice piece too, and thank you for sharing with us.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Apr 20, 2012 10:04 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    SFA use to use film way back when, but that was WAY before I came to this school. Now we just have all the old equipment they used. Which is still real interesting to look at.

    Now, you are probably talking about MY time with cine, or maybe a bit later.

     

    When I got my fist 8-plate Moviola, I thought that I had died, and gone to Heaven. Before, we worked with manual winders and sync. blocks, and could only effectively edit one roll (A Roll) and with Audio. With the Moviola, we could do A-B Roll film editing, and then 2 Audio tracks. Amazing, and it all stayed in sync.!!!!!

     

    When I started editing 35mm film, I had to go back a few steps, to a vertical 2-stream Moviola (no multiple plates there for us), and it was like going back in history, and playing the Old Course at St. Andrews with hickory-shafted clubs, a persimmon driver and a balata golf ball.

     

    I did not come "back" to Video for about 25 - 30 years, and was just amazed. Things had definitely changed, and with digital Video, I suddenly had power, that I had never before imagined. I get rather short with some younger folk, who complain about speed of editing digital Video, when we had to do it all by hand, and often Frame-by-Frame with film. Back in those days, Bins were really Bins, with maybe 200 sections of film hanging in them from clips with scant area to write some details with a grease pencil on the white leader. Now, I can edit an opus on my danged laptop, and it's so very easy, quick and functional.

     

    Film has many attributes, and editing it IS fun - but limiting. You cannot even see your final work, until you get a work-print from the lab. With digital Video, you just hit Enter to Render the footage. If you do get a chance to work in film, take it. If nothing else, you will develop a greater appreciation for what digital Video editing has to offer.

     

    With RED 4K, and others, Video is making giant strides towards the quality, and the look of film. I will never declare that "film is dead," but digital Video is definitely on its way up.

     

    Most of all, enjoy,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • joe bloe premiere
    4,391 posts
    Dec 6, 2009
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    Apr 21, 2012 6:55 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Very nice work on your short, and a hearty forum welcome from a 'nother Texan.

     
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    Apr 21, 2012 8:55 AM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    a beautiful piece of film there, congratulations.

    And welcome to the Forums!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 21, 2012 11:22 AM   in reply to Felix Lewis

    =========

    If you do get a chance to work in film, take it. If nothing else, you will develop a greater appreciation for what digital Video editing has to offer.

    =======

    might help mostly re: how to "organize" the work along with script notes and slated material, sound, etc..you know, how to oganize a long form project. nowadays film will get scanned, edited digital, and then scanned back to film for projection...so i dont think editing the actual film ( a b roll etc ) is happening much out there.

     

    check out color by delux for normal workflows

     

    http://www.bydeluxe.com/ByDeluxeWeb/loginAction.do

     

    the best experience for editing film based vs digital ( eg. panaflex 35mm vs alexa ) might be to check out the cameras and film gates ( size of frames ). For example, I dont think the full chips ( alexa etc ) can do 2 perf wide anamorphic yet ... panavision has some good graphs re: film frame sizes.

     

    http://www.panavision.com/reference?category=84

    can sorta explore from that link maybe

     

    IMO knowing this stuff gives you a little more info re: your project specs and output specs for delivery.

     

    s austin, son of man from CT who had vision of settlers in TX when it was spanish ( mexico then spanish rule ). passed his vision to his son due to illness. Son made pact with mex/spanish authorities to start settlements in western TX, basically putting americans between indian raids and established villages to the east. spain got beat up by mexicans and got kicked out of mexico. then new deal with austin re: his settlements in west, fell through ( austin got put in jail in mexico for a year just for fun and his health got ruined ). santa anna did a scorch and burn campaign against the west tx settlements and began killing all americans ( alamo and goliad ).. and finally chased the remaining americans close to sabine river and north into swampy area.. where the americans stopped running and attacked santa anna and won the battle.. then ( taken alive ) santa anna ordered all mex troops to the south of rio grande, and TX became a soverign state...

     

    so that area near sabine etc is pretty famous for all that running and waving arms and shooting and yelling and screaming etc.  good place for a film school...

     
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    Apr 21, 2012 3:36 PM   in reply to able123

    might help mostly re: how to "organize" the work along with script notes and slated material, sound, etc..you know, how to oganize a long form project. nowadays film will get scanned, edited digital, and then scanned back to film for projection...so i dont think editing the actual film ( a b roll etc ) is happening much out there.

     

    Good points Rod. Back when I was a film student, film editing workflows were just being hashed out. Mr. Edison was starting to edit film, and Mr. Griffith was exploring actually moving the camera. The Brothers Méliès were thinking about a Trip to the Moon.

     

    That's the nice thing about getting in "on the ground floor."

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 21, 2012 4:00 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    Film will always hold a place in my heart, and I do not anticipate witnessing its death, during my lifetime - though Video is making some great strides. Once, I could state with certainty, that I could pick out Video from Film, no matter what the final delivery scheme was. Not so sure anymore, and I am no longer placing bets.

     

    There is much to be learned from handling film, but now, in an academic setting, the expense might not justify actually teaching it with the equipment, the stock and the lab work needed. Unless one is near Hollywood, or New York City, where some equipment might be sitting dormant, or a lab might be willing to donate some processing, etc., it probably would not make sense. I would, however, never trade my time with film, for anything. Learning to make do, with a palette, limited in some ways (such as Transitions) is great for teaching. That also translates to the artistic side, now that there are a bazillion Transitions for Video, but only about 6, that should EVER be used.

     

    Were I teaching a course in photography, there would be an early block with B/W film, and probably one "darkroom session." After that, we could safely get into digital capture and manipulation. If nothing else, my analog days taught me to create the best image possible, because "post-production" was still analog, limited and so very expensive. Now, too many rely on "hey, we can always fix that in Photoshop!"

     

    Post production, in both Stills and Video, is great - a wonderful "tool," but one should still shoot for the ultimate initial results, and then do the "impossible" in post. At least that is my studied opinion.

     

    Good luck, and immerse yourself in every aspect available. Learning how to "think" in terms of Color Correction, Compositing, Lighting, Composition, etc., will help you later. All of it goes together, under the "umbrella," of "learning."

     

    I see too many students want to learn Photoshop, or Premiere, or AfterEffects. That is all well and good, but those programs are but "tools." Learning those tools IS good, but should not be at the expense of learning Photography, or Cinematography.

     

    When digital image manipulation started out, most "operators" of the Scitex programs were just that, "operators." They knew the program, and could probably write much of the code, but with very few exceptions, NONE was even close to being an "artist," or a photographer. After being horribly frustrated with a bunch of "byte-fiddlers," I knew that I had to invest in the programs and equipment to allow ME to do the post-production work. I never looked back.

     

    Once, Lighting for Video was solely based on Lumens/LUX. That was part of what set early Video apart for Cinema - crappy lighting. No so anymore, and your example proves it. Composition was little more than fill the 4:3 Frame with a face, and crop off some of the hair, to fill that Frame. One day, some videographers saw where they were limiting themselves, and began to actually explore Composition, like cinematographers had, decades before them.

     

    I envy you, as you have so much available to you. Take it ALL in. Do not pass on any related Electives. I got my BA, and worked up to almost my MFA, in cine, I concentrated on too many "hardware courses," and of course had a bunch of requisite courses, that were of little use, but academia was hung up on them. Were I able to step back in time, I would have added many more hours of Fine Art, Print-Making, and perhaps even Drama. Could I reverse the hands of time, I would have graduated with about 600 hours of everything, related to my course of study. At least I had the opportunity to spend my Summers with some tech schools' programs in cinematography - just for me, with not one credit transferring. I would have done more, and today, probably could.

     

    Good luck, and the greatest success. Hope to see your name scrolling in those credits (I am one of those, who stay until all of the credits have rolled, saying "Sh-h-h-h, to those leaving the theater."

     

    Hunt

     
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    Apr 21, 2012 4:01 PM   in reply to joe bloe premiere

    Joe,

     

    You never said that you were from Texas!

     

    Hunt

     
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  • joe bloe premiere
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    Dec 6, 2009
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    Apr 22, 2012 7:28 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Born, bred and current resident thereof.

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 9:27 AM   in reply to joe bloe premiere

    I once saw a picture of you with Edison, Bill, in a cine history book, where you are holding Edison's lunch pail in his lab when you were a youngster apprentice.

     

    you certainly started early !

     

     
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    Apr 22, 2012 6:50 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    i wish i had taken theatre classes... and learned how to really read plays etc... later on helps a ton with reading film scripts and pre-visualizing the movie etc.

     

    and taking theatre woulda helped me 'understand' more about what actors are dealing with. to this day i have no clue why anyone would want to act in front of a camera.

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2012 7:48 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    brad sounds like a great guy... especially pulling for you guys to go to nab show.

     

    when doing your acting... do a dolly grip a favor...  dont fake em out...

     

    if youre gonna stand from sitting, do it same way each time, no fakes

    same with moving ( walking etc )- no false starts.

    if lens is tight ( long ) for your close up, dont wag head around a lot

     

    sound guy will love you if you stick finger under glass when you put it down on table

     

    other actors love you when you dont upstage them.. forcing them to look away from camera so we see the back of their head

     

    all sorts of little tricks

     

    another thing which is REALLY important when acting in front of camera....

    bring dolly grip cookies !

     

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 5:12 AM   in reply to able123

    bring dolly grip cookies !

    BRING DOLLY GRIP COOKIES! x2

     

    practice hitting your marks on the ground without looking down.
    In a group of talents in a LS, play yourself out of the frame to get a spontaneous close up made.

    (no seriously, don't... Except a dolly grip asks you to because he needs some overtime)
    be friends with the dolly grip, the lighting technicians and the 1stAC, these guys are the ones that make you look beautiful.

     

    Oh and Film Is Not Dead!

    (it just smells funny)

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 7:02 AM   in reply to Felix Lewis

    hehe... more cookies !  ( butter, simple ones that dont need napkins )

     

    what with everyone else putting their coffee and soda and water on the dolly , messy cookies are no good.  after all...

    ITS A DOLLY, NOT A DELI   !    ( eg. to operator and AC -  keep your junk off my dolly ! )

    talent that brings cookies can put anything he / she wants on dolly...is OK.

     

    in group , try to do this without being 'obvious'... find the lens. If you cant see IT then the lens cant see YOU.

     

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 7:26 AM   in reply to able123

    But ( what I always tell the kids ):

    Don't look into the lens, it's bad for your eyes.

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 7:48 AM   in reply to Felix Lewis

    i forget the tv show ( shot with film, panaflex ) ...think it was ' big apple' ...the camera operator blew up a rubber surgical glove and used a sharpie to put a " face " on it...and taped it to top of whatever magazine was on camera... so that anyone looking toward lens would see this really bizarre stupid looking baloon face staring at them..

     

    this baloon face tended to bob around and shake and wobble a bit, with the camera movement...so it was usually ' animated'.

     

    keeps people from looking directly into lens though.

     

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 3:38 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Film will always hold a place in my heart, and I do not anticipate witnessing its death, during my lifetime

     

    Well ... two months ago...I watched them shut the doors on a Motion Picture Film laboratory that I started and ran with a partner here in Auckland , New Zealand.  From 2 labs...there are now NO processing  laboratories in this city and film sales and useage are critically low for any survival.

     

    Bill...I expect that you will see the demise of film in your lifetime..but the memories will linger on!

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 5:42 PM   in reply to shooternz

    here in Auckland , New Zealand.

     

    No disrespect but...Auckland ain't Hollywood, where the vast majority of all theatrical releases are still shot on film.

     

    It'll happen eventually I'm sure, but given Bill's acquaintance with Georges M., I think it's safe to say film will outlast Bill.

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 5:48 PM   in reply to Tiffany Upshaw

    hiiii

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 6:38 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    No disrespect but...Auckland ain't Hollywood, where the vast majority of all theatrical releases are still shot on film.

     

    A trend is a trend is a trend (for those that are smart enough to see and adapt)... no matter where it is.

     

    1. We processed millions of feet of film for local and international  productions - features, dramas, docos, video clips and TVCs...and that turned into a dribble,  despite more work being filmed in New Zealand.  (Work that Hollywood was not getting I might add FWIW).  Globally labs are struggling under the onslaught of digital.

     

    2. My D.P colleagues and myself very rarely shoot film!  Last 10 jobs I shot - Phantom, Alexa, Red, Panasonic...NO Film!

     

    3. Who is making film cameras now?

     

    4. Who is making film stock in great quantities?

     

    .......

     

    Now I am confidently predicting a long life for Bill ... (dont let me down Bill...I have a wager with Jim ...on you out lasting film)

     

     

    This interesting anyway

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Films_shot_digitally

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_shot_in_digital

     
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    Apr 23, 2012 7:31 PM   in reply to shooternz

    glove baloon.jpg

     

     
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    Apr 24, 2012 11:50 AM   in reply to able123

    i think the discussion on "is film going to die?" could deserve it's own thread,

    i think and hope, there will always be film and there will always be features shot on film...

    having said that, Tiffany, definately do whatever you can to get your hands on film, to touch actual film to edit, maybe "hug" a moviola!

    Or buy one:

    www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110809682325?ssPageNNNa­

    m­e­=S­­TRK­­:M­E­S­EL­­X

     

     

    (speaking of wich: we're all in the Adobe Premiere Forum here, not the Moviola Forum, so maybe digital has gotten quite big )

     
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    Apr 24, 2012 12:23 PM   in reply to Felix Lewis

    I don't think it's a question of "if".  It's more a question of which will last longer, Bill or film production.

     

    No offense to Bill, but I think it'll be film.

     
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    May 5, 2012 7:16 PM   in reply to shooternz

    Whew Craig,

     

    When I first saw those links, I feared that Wiki-pedia had an entry on me outlasting film, or maybe not?

     

    I feel much better now.

     

    Hunt

     
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