Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Proportionally resizing one object to fit another object. How?

Apr 25, 2012 4:32 PM

Tags: #resizing #ratio #proportions #exactly

Hi, thanks a lot for reading! Long time Illustrator User but I just realized I don’t know how to do something very basic. I want to resize one group of objects to fit to another object, without using pixel or cm units (all vector/relative). Here’s a short animation showing what I want to do [click first image to view animation]

 

illustrator_resize_adobe_forum2.gif

 

As you can see, it is impossible to tell when you reached the correct spot, as it doesn’t snap to the other object when using the resize tool.

 

Illustrator_Resize.jpg

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2012 4:40 PM   in reply to loriot123

    Use the Transform panel to enter the desired width of your group. Constrain width and height proportions.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2012 5:38 PM   in reply to loriot123

    Interactive snapping in Illustrator is limited only under the cursor. So, if the point your are trying to snap is not under the cursor you are out of luck.  Also what you demonstrated shows that the Smart Guides won't detect overlapping parts of guides and paths which may be a bug, although it seems to snap if under the cursor and moving (not scaling). So, you don't have much options but to use a numeric input as Steve suggested.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2012 8:00 PM   in reply to loriot123

    Just select your target object (the background in your case) and copy its width value in the Transform panel. Then select all objects you want to scale together, and paste in the width box in the Transform panel making sure before that Constrain Proportions is on (clicking on the chain next to the input fields toggles it). Then move the selection of scaled object in place with the help of smart guides. Alternatively you can first put the selection of objects in place by snapping one of its bounding box corners to a point and in the Transform panel change the reference point located at the left side of the Transform panel.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 4:11 AM   in reply to loriot123

    loriot,

     

    You may, with Smart Guides on:

     

    1) Left align the object to scale with the back ground object, as you have done, with the upper left corner placed as desired (at least roughly/temporarily),

    2) Select the object to scale, change to the Scale Tool, click the upper left corner to keep it there, and drag the lower right corner towards it, Smart Guides showing the way, and then Smart Guides will say intersect when you are there, over the right side segment of the background object path.

     

    You may move the scaled object up and down afterwards, of course.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 4:33 AM   in reply to loriot123

    Numeric will never be precise unless I first resize the first object, to then resize the second accordingly.

    No, you're thinking it wrong. First measure the width of your target object and write it down. Then use the Transform panel like I suggested to enter the combined width of the other objects. You don't have to group them, just select them together. And don't forget to link width/height to constrain the scaling.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 5:36 AM   in reply to Jacob Bugge

    Jacob Bugge wrote:

    ...

    2) Select the object to scale, change to the Scale Tool, click the upper left corner to keep it there, and drag the lower right corner towards it, Smart Guides showing the way, and then Smart Guides will say intersect when you are there, over the right side segment of the background object path.

    ...

    Ah ha, so, the Smart Guides don't like holding Shift !  Because with holding Shift the point to be snapped won't stay under the cursor and this won't work. I guess they have designed the smart guides to work without using any other constraints. It also works if you drag straight towards the edge and after intersecting with it drag along the edge where it intersect with the diagonal of the scaled object - this may be preferable for small scale amounts where the label of the smart guides hides the diagonal guide line. And I guess eyeballing may be good enough for most cases.

    Also, when I first tried this it didn't work for me because in the Smart Guide section of the preferences the Transform tools were not checked. It may be my settings, but I can't remember ever turning this off, so it may be off by default.

     

    Good tip, Jacob! Thanks

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 8:52 AM   in reply to emil emil

    You are welcome, Emil.

     

    ... in the Smart Guide section of the preferences the Transform tools were not checked. It may be my settings, but I can't remember ever turning this off, so it may be off by default.

     

    In the old days it must have been on by default because I cannot remember ever turning it on.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 2:44 PM   in reply to loriot123

    This is strange, loriot.

     

    It seems to work for Emil and me, across quite different versions.

     

    Just to rule out the (maybe less) obvious: do you have CS5, and is Align to Pixel Grid ticked in the Transform panel (when you select (one of) the objects to be scaled?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2012 8:15 PM   in reply to Jacob Bugge

    Jacob has the answer you have align to pixel grid selected otherwise it would work.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 3:11 AM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    There's nothing wrong with the transform method either.

    Measure your target width (in this case 50).

    Select the other stuff and enter 50 in the width box, with width and height linked/constrained.

    Picture 2.png

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 9:51 AM   in reply to loriot123

    In a case like this I would make a note of the width of the green and red objects.

    Then I would calculate the scale % (green divided by red x 100).

    Then select red and blue and enter the scale % using the Scale tool and with the point of origin on the corner you want to enlarge from.

     

    You can also enter the % in the Transform panel (enter % after the digit) and specify the corner.

     

    I always find it useful to have a piece of paper and a pocket calculator at hand for this kind of work.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 11:36 AM   in reply to loriot123

    loriot,

     

    No Emil actually confirmed that it’s simply the way the Transform Tool works,

     

    You may reread post #7.

     

    In the following screenshot, the black guide line was simply made by Direct Selecting the rightmost segment of the green rectangle, giving it a fill instead of a stroke, and extending it downwards; ultimately it was just deleted.

     

    The difficult part was holding the mouse with button down in the right position while also holding Ctrl+Shift with the same hand (and clicking Print Screen with the other hand) to freeze the moment of Smart Guides saying both uniform and intersect, thus proving that it works and works accurately. This was done after completing the whole series, then deleting the third and crucial part in order to redo it.

     

    And there is nothing wrong with calculating/copying/inserting values either.

     

     

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 12:20 PM   in reply to loriot123

    loriot,

    it is what Jacob said, Smart Guides work but if you don't hold the Shift key. If you hold the Shift key the point to be snapped can't stay under the cursor. The Smart Guides work by calculating the position of the cursor.

     

    @ Jacob, the screen capture was easy here - one hand holding the Wacom pen and the other pressing the PrintScr.

    Added notes too hoping to make it easy to follow

    Capture.JPG

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 12:29 PM   in reply to emil emil

    Emil,

     

    I have to press Ctrl+Shift too, or Print Screen will not work. And then it is easier with a mouse because I can nudge it close to the keyboard, keeping it in place with the thumb (and little finger) and then use the forefinger to hold the left button and the long finger and ring finger for Ctrl and Shift. I might use the right hand for the keys, of course, and the nose for the Print Screen button, but then I cannot keep an eye on the cursor position which will almost certainly be off.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 12:39 PM   in reply to Jacob Bugge

    I guess you are using a mac? On Windows it is a dedicated key PrtSC on the keyboard after F12. I also have dedicated screen capture programs that will capture the cursor too but I'm too lazy to use them.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 12:59 PM   in reply to emil emil

    Emil,

     

    It is Windows (XP), but for some reason, or no reason, it only works when holding the other keys. The key (between F12 and Scroll Lock) says Print Screen/SysRq.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 1:20 PM   in reply to Jacob Bugge

    Yes, that's the key. Something's wrong with your XP. I use mostly Windows 7 but I have XP computers around me too and it works the same there. I know that Alt+ PrtSc will capture only the active window vs the whole screen but I've never heard of Ctrl+Shift. I'm using US keyboard.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 2:16 PM   in reply to emil emil

    Emil,

     

    I have tried to use the Print Screen key by itself from time to time over the years, in vain. It seems to have just started working.

     

    You must have convinced it, almost: the Alt key makes no difference: everything on the entire screen is shown whatever it is and whatever is active/selected, with or without Alt.

     

    Thank you very much.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2012 10:37 PM   in reply to loriot123

    I wonder if you had snap to grid turned on? The View menu.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 28, 2012 2:11 PM   in reply to loriot123

    For my part you are welcome, loriot. One of the pleasant challenges here is the often joint effort to express things in the way that is needed in each particular case, including the crucial detail(s).

     

    More or less like Steve, I always have a few used A4 papers partly tucked under the keyboard, for small sketches and writing down sizes and coordinates; and the good old calculator, still going strong into its thirtieth year the second battery inserted a year ago, is also somewhere; I can usually feel its shape under some of the other papers; and at least one of the propelling pencils is usually in sight.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 28, 2012 2:48 PM   in reply to loriot123

    I bought a computer to think for me!

    I have yet to meet one that does that.

    Garbage in, garbage out. That's the way computers work.

    If you thought differently you were under a serious misconception.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points