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Snapshot from Premiere CS4 timeline

Aug 18, 2009 10:11 AM

How is that done in CS4? In CS3, you were able to export a snapshot direct from the timeline into JPEG format (or something that can be emailed.) Now it starts a queue for Adobe Media Player and offers no such format for still pictures.

 
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    Aug 18, 2009 10:20 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    In CS4.1 it is easy (maybe not as easy as with CS3, but easy). You want to Export Frame, and it will use AME for this. The one difference is that in earlier versions, one could check to Add to Project. This is not possible, directly, anymore. You'd need to go to the Export folder, and then Import that TIFF/BMP into the Project.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Aug 18, 2009 10:25 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    As mentioned down in my earlier reply: TIFF, or BMP. JPEG is not available for an Export Frame. I use TIFF, and am very happy. If I need to work on the Exported Frame, I just open it in PS and do the work, Saving as a .PSD for use back in PrPro. Sorry that I did not flag that TIFF & BMP better.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Aug 18, 2009 12:33 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Personally, I'd Export them to a working folder, and then use PS to do the compression. I'd pick an adequately small enough Image Size and create an Action to do the resizing, and go to Save_For_Web, again choosing a compression setting that was  the best quality vs the smallest file size.

     

    In File>Automate>Batch, one would point to the above folder as the Source Folder, and another, newly created one as the Destination Folder, then with that new Action set in the dialog screen, hit OK. In moments, you have that new folder filled with the resized, and compressed JPEG's.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Aug 18, 2009 2:06 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    That is only because you made the same mistake I have made many times. There is a tick box when exporting as BMP, labeled 'Export as sequence' which is turned on by default. You have to turn that off before exporting. I would prefer a different default, or even better, remembering the last setting.

     
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    Aug 18, 2009 6:49 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard
    or even better, remembering the last setting.

     

    I'd wish for this in many areas, and in many programs.

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 5, 2012 7:51 PM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    BMP are also incredibly large, so it's not just that exporting a sequence is bad, the format is bad (for size) as well.  Even TIFF's are huge, so unfortunately you have to export to TIFF and then resize with Photoshop (or another photo editor).  Poor planning on Adobe's part.  There are SO MANY times a user needs to e-mail a still to someone, and not having the ability to export JPEG is bad, bad, bad.

     
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    May 5, 2012 8:02 PM   in reply to digabyte

    I believe that the decision, on Adobe's part, was to provide formats, that would be better to use in video production, than JPEG, which is compressed.

     

    Now, Photoshop makes it easy to adjust an Image, regardless of original format, for e-mails, Web, etc., with Save_For_Web. That allows one to do so many more things, out of the realm of video editing.

     

    However, that is but speculation on my part.

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 6, 2012 4:46 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    In my opinion, the number one reason to capture a screen shot is to show someone (director, cinematographer, etc.) what's going on after capture or in the edit (framing, color, subject matter, etc.).  This means e-mailing the image, which is size prohibitive with TIFF.  Excluding JPEG is an oversite on Adobe's part.  JPEG is the format for photo exchange (some might argue PNG, but JPEG is still more universal/widely used), thus excluding JPEG from Premiere's export capapilities is not only frustrating, but irresponsible.

     

    As far as "better used in video production," importing TIFF (for use in a composition/timeline), yes that is useful.

     
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    May 7, 2012 4:49 PM   in reply to digabyte

    Do you have Photoshop?

     

    If so, it's easy to record an Action to Save_As JPEG, and even Scale it, if needed. One can then use Automate>Batch w/ the Action to almost instantly process entire folders. Scripts will also allow for this.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 7, 2012 5:30 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    The whole point is: why would I need to open an entire other program (two in fact) for something as simple and oft used as exporting a JPEG from a timeline.  I e-mail screen grabs to the director or various other people in the chain of command almost every time I use Premiere (on a daily basis), and having to open three programs (Premiere, Adobe Media Encoder, and Photoshop) for a simple screen shot is ridiculous.

     
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    May 7, 2012 7:04 PM   in reply to digabyte

    Well, one very good reason is that Photoshop is an Image Editing program, and Premiere Pro is a Video Editing program.

     

    One might be able to pound a nail with a screwdriver, but it is really ill-suited for the task. A hammer is much better suited.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 7, 2012 7:11 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Exactly my point.  There is no image EDITING going on.  It's a simple screen shot export, and there is no question that the ability to export a screen still for sharing directly from Premiere should be incorporated into the program.  You can defend the oversite till you're blue in the face, but not being able to quickly share a screen still is not intentional; it's an obvious oversite.

     
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    May 8, 2012 7:54 AM   in reply to digabyte

    Then it's time for a Feature Request.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 8, 2012 8:12 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    The thing is, it used to be there, and they took it away!  CS3 had a single key stroke JPEG export from the Premiere timeline (you didn't even need to use AME).  So it's really a Feature Reinstate Request.

     
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    May 8, 2012 9:00 AM   in reply to digabyte

    FWIW, that feature has been reinstated in CS5.5 and CS6.  Maybe even as far back as CS5, if memory serves.

     

    Jeff

     
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    May 8, 2012 9:09 AM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Thanks, Jeff.  This was the simple answer for which I was fishing.  No to mention it validates my defense of the need for the feature!   I've been holding out for CS6 and am eager to make the upgrade.

     
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    May 9, 2012 5:36 AM   in reply to digabyte

    The easy way, at no cost, to resize is:

     

    Microsoft offers free download of a Windows XP Image Resize Powertoy on their website.

     

    http://www.wikihow.com/Easily-Resize-Photos-in-Windows-XP

     

    Fred

     


     
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    May 9, 2012 7:25 AM   in reply to Fred Mann

    Another free program is http://www.irfanview.com/

     
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