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traces of shape after using opacity mask and importing to photoshop

May 22, 2012 1:48 PM

Okie dokie folks help me out here. In case it matters

Macbook

osx lion

AI CS5

 

I created this logo in Illustrator. I made my basic shapes with a pen tool, put a vector grunge texture over the top of the shapes and then used "make opacity mask" to get my grunge effect. As you can see in the screenshot of my illy it is all very clean and looking like it should. When you open my other picture you can see that once I transferred (cmd+copy cmd+paste) the logo into PS you can now see faint lines of where the shapes used to be *highlighted in red*. I also tried placeing the .ai file in ps but got the same effect. I am using all pantone colors on the logo, both documents are set to 300 dpi....err I cant think of anything else. PS is in RGB, Illustrator is in CMYK (but using Pantone)

 

What gives, how do I get my logo to look as good in PS as it does in Ilustrator?

 

MichaelScreen Shot 2012-05-22 at 3.41.36 PM.pngcrossfitwhy.jpg

 
Replies
  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 1:51 PM   in reply to mhossey

    Simple. Your Opacity Mask's black is actually dark grey.

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:11 PM   in reply to mhossey

    CMYK or RGB?  Your opacity mask needs to be 100|100|100|100 black when you work in CMYK where you want it completely knocked out.  Right now I'm guessing it's 0|0|0|100

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 2:13 PM   in reply to mhossey

    K, not so simple . . . good point there. You've verified your image mask is RBG and the blacks are really blacks, right?

     

    Your Opacity Mask looks like vector image data. Did you rasterize it before using it for your Opacity Mask?

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 2:17 PM   in reply to Jesseham

    Whether you're pasting into an RGB or CMYK document, in Photoshop, also matters. Just tested it.

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:18 PM   in reply to Mathias17

    I found the answer, a very simple one and what you will have to doto correct it is use the levels or currves to produce more contrast.

     

    The reason for this and you can check this out yourself, is that RGB has a larger color gamit than does cmyk.

     

    You can check this out zoom in on your art in Illustrator now change the color mode to RGB and now you see what you see in Photoshop.

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:21 PM   in reply to mhossey

    Is the black mask also a Pantone color? When moving the stuff over to Photoshop, spot colors aren't preserved and converted to CMYK. So maybe this happened to your mask.

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 2:24 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    But Wade, that'll alter the Opacity Mask's more subtle gradation and anti-aliasing. Seems better to just figure out the color space issue going on.

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:27 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Or change the color mode to cmyk in Photoshop

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:30 PM   in reply to Mathias17

    Jump up and own kick the wall bang your head against the wall that is all there is to this issue.the two color modes see things differently.

     

    Nothing I or you or anyone else here or anywhere else can do about it.

     
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    May 22, 2012 2:33 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    To MHossey do yourself a favor don't worry about it it looks good to me and when if this is being printed then chang the photoshop file to CMYK and then paste but either way it looks good.

     

    There is no such thing as perfect so job well done BTW!

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 3:23 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Hehe, Wade. As a designer, I definitely need it to like exactly as planned, so in my case, I'm not going to settle for less just because of a quirky software problem.

     

     

    A test:

     

    In Photoshop, I created a gradient, in a CMYK document. I used Layer Styles so I could define a 0,0,0,0 to 100,100,100,100 linear gradient. Then I blobbed on some random grungy drops, using 100,100,100,100.

     

    Saved as a CMYK PSD, I then tossed it into a new Illustrator file - a CMYK document. I then masked a 100,100,100,100-filled circle with that imported gradient PSD (didn't mask the red lines).

     

    testtest.PNG

     

    Then copy/pasted the Opacity Masked result into a new CMYK Photoshop doc:

     

    b4levels.PNG

     

    Looks good. To check, I add a Levels Adjustment Layer and crank it up:

     

    afterlvls.PNG

     

    Though the gradation got a little clipped, where there's black in the Opacity Mask PSD, it's certainly giving the correct knockout effect. And the OP isn't even wanting subtle gradation in his Mask, it's just a simple binary looking one.

     
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    May 22, 2012 3:38 PM   in reply to Mathias17

    You do every day of your life settle for the limitaions of the fcts of life and this is not a software issue it is the waay things are. Two different color gamuts all there is to it I do not believe the issue you are pointing to has anything to do with this limitation.

     

    You will simply get two different results from RGB and CMYK from the same art.

     

    But if you wish to bang your head against the wall feel free.

     

    Once you accomplished soething that is great perfection is irrelevant and so is the way you want it to be.

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 4:04 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Uhh yeah . . . ok, Wade. Whatever, man. Your cowboy hat mayb be a bit too tight, today.

     

     

     

    Ok, so the grungemap you like was originally  -Or-  is vector?

     

    I very highly recommend you not use a rasterized image of it for an Opacity Mask, if you have the original vector.

     

    Rather, save your fresh, clean vector lines,

    make a copy,

    place the vector grunge above the copy (in other words, save your logo's various iterations as you progress through the design process),

    select both logo and grunge and hit Pathfinder Panel > Divide,

    delete all original grunge paths.

     

    Your left with a logo that's been permanently knocked out. For the one-color version, make it all a compound path for maximum easability when placing it in layouts, pasting in Photoshop, etc.

     

     

     

    (a little design crit, not asked for, but since I like your design: you sure you don't wanna chop off either left or right side of the wings, mirror it over and merge it back together so the wings are perfectly symmetrical?)

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
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    May 22, 2012 4:33 PM   in reply to mhossey

    Yeah, I save time with pre-done stuff pulled off the web, too. If it works, it works!

     

    Oh ok, does your file-keeping system pertain to similarly numbered proofs sent out or something? I find it very convenient to start and end all in one file, just alt+dragging to the right whenever I want to save an iteration. All previous steps are right there if you need to go back or "go back in time" and grab something from a previous iteration. I most usually save the final version out into a nice, small, clean file, so the done deal is all by itself and easily embeddable in other stuff.

     

    One trick you can do when using a Pathfinder operation to do a knockout is color the knockout paths (in this case, your vector grunge of course) bright pink or any unique color. Do the pathfinding Divide or however you want to do it and use the Magic Wand to select only that nasty pink color, then delete, do a path clean-up and BAM - finito.

     

    Converting to a Compound Path can be great if you're all done with everything - it makes it harder to accidentily move peices of your logo around without the rest of it, makes selecting it a bit easier.

    If you have a path, like a letter "O", it's actually two closed paths that comprise one Compound Path, so the knockout can take place, otherwise it's just two elipses stacked up. As always, there's pros' and con's to either using a Group or Compound Path to hold it all together as you place it in other stuff. Though, it sounds like you're going to use it in Photoshop anyway, so kind of a moot point. It'll just be a Smart Object in PS.

     

    Ah ok, so you're not really after perfect symmerty - just making sure you didn't painstakingly draw both sides manually haha.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 22, 2012 5:00 PM   in reply to Mathias17

    You don't like my hat size do you! well!

     
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  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 22, 2012 5:09 PM   in reply to mhossey

    Hehe, Wade.

     

     

    Awesome, happy to help. Spread the love'n!

     
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