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CS6 Production Premium upgrade - any problems to delete old versions?

May 29, 2012 8:33 AM

Am looking to upgrade to CS6 from CS5.  However the CS4 full install original is still on my PC because I read it could cause problems with CS5 to delete it.

 

Have also read on these forums that all upgrades are full installs and that older versions can be uninstalled so long as I have an older version serial key number to use. 

Also that the Adobe registry cleaner should be used after an uninstall - but the Adobe site seems to be talking about using its "CS Cleaner Tool" after uninstalling pre-release versions - not purchased upgrades.

 

So Q. is can CS4 & CS5 be safely uninstalled prior to loading CS6?  (All Production Premium.)  And should the CS Cleaner Tool be used?

 

Does anyone have a definite answer on this please?  Naturally want to avoid keeping old stuff on the system if possible.

 

Haven't found a general forum for CS6 Production Premium.  Please redirect if not okay here. Mostly using PremierePro. 

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 8:34 AM   in reply to Night Day

    If you're going to remove them, it's best to do so before you install the new version.

     

    Yes, run the Cleaner tool.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 9:15 AM   in reply to Night Day

    I don't know about other Adobe products, but for Premiere Pro the installer does not remove old versions by design... many people WANT multiple versions, to be able to finish old projects in the old version of the program (there have been several postings, some recent, from people who have problems with old projects in newer software)

     

    It is your choice to keep or remove old versions

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 9:19 AM   in reply to Night Day

    You use the version that the project was created with. If you need to modify it later, you use THAT version, not a newer version. That is the best approach. That is why newer versions do not require you to remove older versions. They can happlily coexist on your system. If you are certain you will never need to modify old projects, you can remove older versions FIRST and then install newer versions. Most people leave older installations intact and can work perfectly well with CS4, CS5, CS5.5 and CS6 installed.

     
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    May 29, 2012 9:55 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    I'll pipe in to say that I recommend keeping the old versions around until you haven't used them for months.  Just last week, I had to revert to Ae CS5.5 because CS6 was crashing on me in front of a client every five minutes.  I got the project done with no issues in CS5.5.

     

    Pr CS6 doesn't have full-screen playback to external monitors via Tranmit via Kona at this point, so I need Pr CS5.5 around for full-screen playback.

     

    Also, there are some plug-ins that don't work in newer versions that were working fine in older versions.  You may need the old version to update a previous project.

     

    It's only when I'm pretty sure I won't need to fire up the old versions before I feel comfortable removing them.  As has been mentioned, the new versions of Adobe usually co-exist peacefully with older versions.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 10:53 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    If you're going to remove them, it's best to do so before you install the new version.

    I'll have to respectfully disagree with that statement for the reasons that Harm, Jim Curtis and John T Smith have brought out.

     

    Architecturally speaking, I have never experienced any inter-version conflicts when installing/uninstalling or running them both at once, and I keep at least two different versions on one of my test systems at all times for test purposes. When you are certain that you are ready to free up some disk space by removing an older version, uninstall should be adequate. You can run an authorized clean script if you like just to purge most of what may be left, but just make sure you're running the CORRECT script for that version.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 11:35 AM   in reply to jstrawn

    When deinstalling an older version it some how manages to take something along that the newer version needs.

    Leaving the new version not working correctly.

    Experienced it several times.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 29, 2012 11:35 AM   in reply to jstrawn

    I have never experienced any inter-version conflicts when uninstalling

     

    Then you've been lucky.  Plenty of folks in this forum have had issues with the new version if they removed the old version after.

     

    I agree there's no harm in leaving it installed.  But if you do plan to uninstall, it's better to do that before you put the new one on.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 2:27 AM   in reply to Night Day

    There is one major snitch in your reasoning and that is plug-ins. For instance Red Giant and Matrox. Both are used pretty often, well Red Giant quite a bit more than Matrox, but both are relatively popular. When Adobe comes out with a new version, mostly it includes improved stability, bug removal, added features, but in some cases changes that mean the removal of certain parts. That is why with a new version, existing projects must be converted first and it is not unheard of that even without the use of plug-ins, there are problems, because of changed effects, settings that were altered etc. Now if Red Giant or Matrox need to update their plug-ins to make them fully compatible with the new CS versions, you can't expect them to be ready on the exact day that Adobe releases a new version. So the consequence of your proposal is that a large number of people can not use the new version, because they have to wait for all the plug-ins they use are ready too. In the case of Matrox that may be 6 months after the release of a new Adobe version. That is unacceptable.

     

    Your statement:

    Adobe should make darn sure old versions are not needed.

    is devoid of any realism, because Adobe does not manage and control all the plug-in suppliers.

     

    And what is the downside of having a guaranteed workable solution for older projects by leaving the installed version intact, the loss of a couple of GB space? So what?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 7:31 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    There isn't a one-size-fits-all answer for this.  If you're adventurous and faithful and drive-space poor, go ahead and delete prior versions.  Live with the consequences.  I still keep Ae CS4 around on one system because that was the last 32-bit version, and I have plug packages that weren't upgraded to 64-bit, and I might need to use one at some point in time.  It's worth it to me to keep it around just for that.

     

    I have hundreds of backup DVD-ROMs with files on them I created in OS9, and consequently, I'm keeping an old G4 around just in case I need to open one some day.  Which reminds me... Ae CS6 won't open project versions too far back.  I can't remember the exact limit, but I think it won't open Ae CS3 (AKA Ae 6).  So, that's another reason to keep CS4.

     

    This whole issue is "con" against using an SSD for your boot disk.  Currently, they're just too small to hold the OS, apps, caches, and vital swap files.  Like many things, there's a trade-off, and each person has to decide what factors count more, and take their medicine.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 7:52 AM   in reply to Jim Curtis

    I don't know what Adobe's 'official' stance is on this, and I'm not an offial PR spokesperson for adobe. I'm just trying to speak honestly about my own experice as a fellow user. If you're in a position to get rid of all your old stuff and start fresh anew then running an uninstall and a cleanscript is a good idea. I can't speak with authority on that because I typically don't use cleanscripts. I either restore to a clean OS image or just use the uninstaller. But I always carry at least one system with two or more consecutive versions installed on it. Having an extra version is no more obtrusive to me than the extra's GB's it occupies and I get a lot out of it because it lets me compare current behavior to previous version(s). Perhaps I've just been lucky, but I have been running multi-version software setups for well over 10 years now and as long as I'm using the actual released software I've had no conflicts. For the record, I do occassionally encounter uninstall-install component conflicts during a dev cycle, so I acknowledge they exist, but it's almost always due to an architectural change that was intentionally made to the installer during development.

     

    We do extensive project upgrade and installer testing at each new release to ensure that you encounter no problems following wichever path you choose. We try not to assume that you will be running on an especially clean system, or an especially dirty one for that matter. But, there are only a relatively few of us testing these things in-house compared the thousands of users with unique scenarios that may generate problems we have not seen. I think Harm's (and others') point is that if you're in the middle of a big important project, why would you choose to upgrade software right in the middle of it and take that chance at all? I don't believe there is much risk there (assuming you're not jumping about half a dozen versions at one upgrade) but that still seems like common sense advice to me...

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 8:31 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Now if Red Giant or Matrox need to update their plug-ins to make them fully compatible with the new CS versions, you can't expect them to be ready on the exact day that Adobe releases a new version.

     

    I disagree.  I know it doesn't always happen, but I do strongly believe that it SHOULD happen every single time a new version of Adobe software is released.  Third parties should be given the access they need with the time they need to make any necesary updates.  This falls to both Adobe and the third parties.

     

    Having said that, your point is valid because it doesn't always happen the way it should.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 8:41 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Slight tangent here...   If you do decide to uninstall a previous suite or version, be aware that clean scripts and uninstallers aren't necessarily going to get rid of everything.  I've often seen instances where I do an "uninstall," and then search for "Adobe" or "CS5," etc. only to find several to dozens of files still on my drive. 

     

    Then, I just delete them manually.  I always try to clone my disk before doing things like this, in case I go too far, and remove something I shouldn't have.  Or, just be prepared to re-install the suite I want to keep working.

     

    Others recommend a total wipe of the boot drive, re-install OS and all other components.  But, that's not practial for me.  I run dozens of apps, plugs and extensions.  Last time I did this, several years ago, it took 8 hours.  It would take longer now, because I have more stuff.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 8:54 AM   in reply to jstrawn

    Upgrades and compatibility problems can happen with any complex program... when new features are added

     

    Microsoft Office is another area where the latest version produces files that are not backwards compatible, due to new features saved in the new files, that the old software can't use (Word and Access that I know of, maybe other parts of the Office suite)

     

    Anyone working with Premiere Pro needs to decide if the new features are important... and upgrade if the answer is yes... but then realize that backward compatibility may be a problem, so also decide on keeping the previous version installed, or not, to finish old projects

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 30, 2012 9:01 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Plenty of folks in this forum have had issues with the new version if they removed the old version after.

    My guess would be that their issues are not so much from the uninstall but from the cleanscript. There's a reason the uninstaller removes what it does and leaves what it does. I would certainly not recommend running a cleanscript for CS5.5 after CS6 is already installed, even though the cleaner tool says it's designed to not interfere with existing installations of previous versions.

     

    Furthermore, the Adobe web page:

    http://www.adobe.com/support/contact/cscleanertool.html

    Says that the Adobe CS Cleaner Tool helps resolve installation problems... So I see no reason to use it unless you're actively having installation problems.

     

    @Anne: are you saying you've experienced componenent loss using just the uninstaller for an older version?

     
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