Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Integral sign (using paintbrush tool)

Jun 3, 2012 2:54 AM

Whenever I draw an integral sign (using paintbrush tool) for those math savvy people know that the symbol is an elongated "S".

 

I am writing a document using the paintbrush tool because I want to convert hand written notes into PDF using illustrator because there are alot of scientific illustrations.

 

When I write math notes and write the integral sign the following appears in the image below. It is like half of the end of the elongated ends become "half-filled" instead of one nice vector stroke (see image below). How do I stop it from doing that ?

 

http://img715.imageshack.us/img715/6404/testbjh.png

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 3:42 AM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    Use a Math font. Seriously. You are *drawing* text? It's the 21st century, you know, no need anymore for quills or fountain pens.

     

    If you do this because you prefer the manual touch hand-drawn text provides, draw your integrals with the line tool. This effect you see may be an artefact of the brush tool, which thinks you are painting something -- I seriously doubt it was meant for "writing".

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 3:54 AM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    A font that contains math symbols. Even the standard default font that comes installed with your average operating system "Symbol" contains a proper integral sign (in two parts; a legacy issue).

     

    "Symbol" is pretty limited -- again, it's sort of a legacy font by now --, you might be better off with a modern version of Times New Roman, or, when in dire straits, Arial Unicode MS. These contain *lots* of special mathematical operators. A specialized math font tops that off with integrals, summations, and brackets in various sizes. If you are on a Windows machine, check out the glyph set of Cambria Math, and you will see why it's got that name.

     

    And then there's always Google.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 4:36 AM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    ghostanime,

     

    What happens if you reduce the Fidelity and Smoothness (DoubleClicking the Tool), maybe as low as you can go?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 5:02 AM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    www.1001freefonts.com

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 2:54 PM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    that is a long outstanding bug.

     

    You can get a math font free here

     

    https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Mozilla_MathML_Project/Fonts

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 3, 2012 4:44 PM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    You don't even need a Math font. Many regular fonts have one: (U+222B)

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Mathias17
    451 posts
    Feb 20, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 4, 2012 5:11 AM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    And CS6 still does this. I find it very irritating as well.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 27, 2012 12:45 PM   in reply to ghostanime2001

    Brushes aren't meant to be any more precise than traditional brushes. If you ask a brush to draw at too tight of an angle or curve, this is what you get. Use the pen tool and it won't happen.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points