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indesign is 64 bit or 32 bit?

Jun 4, 2012 10:42 PM

I have win 7 64 bit edition. But indesign files are present in C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\...does that mean that Indesign is a 32 bit application?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 4, 2012 10:55 PM   in reply to arjun2

    The current version of InDesign is indeed a 32-bit application that works quite well on 64-bit Windows 7.

     

              - Dov

     
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    Nov 5, 2012 1:13 PM   in reply to Dov Isaacs

    My problem is that Windows 7 isn't recognizing my inDesign files and not allowing me to associate them with inDesign in the (x86)\Adobe folder. Any suggestions?

     
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    Nov 5, 2012 1:21 PM   in reply to newtownanimal

    Your choices are pretty much edit the registry or reinstall (which I recommend). If you go that route, uninstall, then run the clean tool (CS Cleaner Tool for installation problems | CCM, CS6, CS5.5, CS5, CS4, CS3) before reinstalling.

     
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    Nov 5, 2012 1:29 PM   in reply to newtownanimal

    If your copy of InDesign is fully and properly installed, all .indd files are associated with InDesign. This is accomplished by InDesign's use of what is called a shell extension, a module that is called in by Windows Explorer whenever a .indd file is encountered. This shell extension determines which InDesign icon to display (they differ based on which was the last version of InDesign to edit the document file) and causes Windows Explorer to invoke InDesign when double-clicking on a .indd file icon.

     

    If this is not working on your system, there are two common possibilities:

     

    (1)     You are using a fairly old version of InDesign that was not designed to be installed on 64-bit versions of Windows. (What version of InDesign do you have? Your post doesn't provide that information.)

     

    (2)     You have multiple versions of InDesign installed on your system or perhaps a partially installed or uninstalled version which is intefering with proper registration and operation of the shell extension for InDesign.

     

    Assuming that you have at least the CS4 version of InDesign, I would totally uninstall any and all versions of InDesign on your system and then run the Creative Suite Cleaner Tool - see <http://www.adobe.com/support/contact/cscleanertool.html>. Then reinstall your software.

     

              - Dov

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 9:57 AM   in reply to Dov Isaacs

    No wonder I have a blazing fast 64 bit Win7, 8 GB RAM, 6-processor AMD CPU computer, but Indesign is still STINKING SLOW. Adobe needs to GET WITH THE PROGRAM, AND HOW.

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:13 AM   in reply to PhiBible

    If it's "stinking slow" you have something else going on and if you'd care to dial back the attitude and give us some real details, you might get some help.

     

    Bob

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:39 AM   in reply to Bob Levine

    I'm trying to handle 200 mb ID files. I've been using ID since 2001. It's gotten much better over the years, but my files just keep growing and growing. I now have a racehorse computer with all the power that I could possibly need. I also use Cyberlink powerdirector for video editing. The 32 bit version was very slow and took several hours to process a 1 hour video, but when I upgraded to the 64 bit version, the processing time dropped dramatically to roughly an hour for the same video.

     

    I see the same problem here. ID 32 bit is doing its best, but I am certain that a fully native 64 bit version would handle large files like mine much better, as it can address way more memory, not to mention just work faster in general. I've noticed that when I load my 200 mb file into ID, the task manager shows that almost 3 GB of memory are being used. Knowing that 32 bit can address only 4 GB of memory maximum, doesn't it make sense that a 64 bit ID would be able to handle large files like this much better?

     

    On another angle, 32 bit applications are out of date for major tools like Indesign. They work fine for small programs that don't handle large amounts of data, but the computing world (except for Adobe InDesign) has moved on to 64 bit for serious work like publishing, photo editing and video. I need the extra power for my work, so I would greatly appreciate it if Adobe could get up to speed, because InDesign is the tool I use most often. I currently use CS4, but if CS6 is still 32 bit, I don't seen any reason I should upgrade. I may even look at some other 64 bit tools out there if they can convert my ID files to theirs, if Adobe thinks my need for 64 bit is not important.

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:51 AM   in reply to PhiBible

    If you look around the forums you'll see that Dov has already

    acknowledged that the next major release will be 64 bit.

     

    That is no small task since the program needs to be decarbonized on the

    Mac side in order to move to 64 bit.

     

    All that said, I work with some monster file sizes as well, but not 200

    megs. Are you doing a file save as on occasion to get the file size

    down? Do you have screen redraw set to delayed?

     

    Other things to speed up ID are turning of live preflight and disabling

    thumbnails in the pages panel.

     

    Bob

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 11:53 AM   in reply to Bob Levine

    I just downloaded the CS6 ID trial version, and it converted the 200 mb file to a 150 mb file, which is nice. It's still struggling though. I do not use preflight. I found that it was more of a pain than a help during session where all I'm doing is working with the text and not preparing something for final review. I use small icons in the page panel, not a big problem there.

     

    I do a file save every minute or so to prevent losing work if ID or my computer crashes for some reason. That rarely happens anymore, thanks to the reliability of Win7, but I'm still kind of paranoid about that. I really don't like having to redo work that should already be done, so I save often. ID saves the file in a couple of seconds.

     

    One thing I've noticed about ID, at least up to CS4, is that after working with a file over a long period of time (adding things like bookmarks, many small text boxes inline with the text so that special characters can be put there and display correctly with the main text, and so on), causes the file to really bulk up with a lot of what seems to be file trash. I know this, because on a number of occasions (in an attempt to remove this trash and have a clean document file) I have gone through the process of creating a brand new document file and porting over the previous work by copying and pasting just the text and anything associated with the text (like the inline text boxes for special characters) into fresh text boxes in the new document. After porting over all of the content, the new document file is quite a bit smaller and somewhat easier to handle.

     

    I've seen this on every version I've owned since 2001. I do not know if Adobe knows about this problem, but I think that having some kind of "garbage collector" mechanism that removes all unnecessary stuff from a file when things are deleted would really help.

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 12:00 PM   in reply to PhiBible

    I've been using ID since 1999 and I have NEVER lost data to a crash.

     

    InDesign's recovery feature borders on magic.

     

    Bob

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 12:34 PM   in reply to PhiBible

    Do you always simply save or do you use save as?

     

    Save simply adds the modified pages to end of the existing document. Save as cleans up the document writing out the entire document as a new file.

     

    There is some buildup of XMP data in the InDesign document documenting the document's history of edits, that is relatively minor compared to the debris left by the simple save operation.

     

              - Dov

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 1:04 PM   in reply to PhiBible

    PhiBible wrote:

     

     

     

    I do a file save every minute or so to prevent losing work if ID or my computer crashes for some reason.

    That's probably the source of most of the file bloat. Did you notice that Bob said Save AS? The save as rewrites the file and removes all the old change data that you can no longer access once the file has been closed. A trip through .inx or .idml will clean out the crud, too.

     
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    Jan 30, 2013 4:21 PM   in reply to Peter Spier

    You're absolutely right. I did a save as, and the file size is now about 135 mb. I did the others in the group also, and one of them is about half the original size.

     

    I wish I had known about this years ago, because it cost me a lot of man-hours fixing this the hard way. Thanks very much for that tip.

     
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    Jan 31, 2013 10:20 AM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Thanks for the tips, guys. I've been trying out CS6, and it seems to work more efficiently, especially when inserting a new line, which causes all of the text below it to move forward/down. CS4 (for whatever reason) is a little sluggish in that area.

     

    Nonetheless, I believe native 64 bit is important for my work, so I'll be looking forward to that when it comes out.

     

    I do have a request for a future feature. It may already be present in CS6, so if it is, please tell me so I can use it.

     

    I said before that I have many small text boxes that I place in-line with the text, so that I can put, say, Hebrew characters or some other font, in-line with English Arial characters, and it won't play havoc with the English text display.

     

    So sometimes these characters are colored red, and sometimes black; sometimes I need to copy and paste these special text boxes and reuse them to save time, but I want to change the color of the text inside to either black or red. Right now, the only option I know about is to select the text, then manually click on the color panel for the color desired to change the color. What I would like to do is to be able to use some keyboard shortcut that tells the program "Do the last thing that I just did again", no matter what it was. MS Word has this feature, and it's very handy.

     

    Obviously, this is an idea for a macro. I've looked into CS4, and "macros" there are not exactly like that. I shouldn't have to tell the program to do a specific thing every time. Like Word, I should be able to just tell the program to do the last command again, no matter what it was.

     

    Thanks!

     
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    Jan 31, 2013 11:23 AM   in reply to PhiBible

    You can set up character styles to change the color and assign shortcuts to them. And if you select the frame you don't need to select the text inside  it if you want it all formatted the same way. I'm a little curious why you need to use inline frames, though. CS6 has full support for RTL languages, though it isn't obvious, and you might find you need the World Tools plugin from In-Tools.com to to everything you want.

     

    I'm also curious what real benefit you think you will see from a 64-bit version of ID?

     
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    Jan 31, 2013 12:21 PM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Peter, I thought I already made that clear. My files are very large. I've been working on the Kingdom Bible project since 2000-2001, which is a project whose aim is to uncover the true format of the Bible, and I've been using ID since 2001. You can find my website at www.phibible.org.

     

    So I have a total of six large files, the smallest of which is about 45 mb on up to around 140 mb. Sometimes, I like to load all six files into ID along with the "Book" file, so that all of the pages can be renumbered due to the fact that I've added pages. And even if I only load the Book file and do the renumbering, the process can be time-consuming either way.

     

    Also, when I add a line to the text inside a story, the story might be as long as 20 or 30 pages, contained in a 8.5 x 14 legal-size page format. With all of the inline text boxes and special characters (I insert Ultra-black superscript characters (A,B,C,D.....Z, AA, AB,AC,...BA, BB,BC,...) into the text to mark the original verse markers (the old chapter and verse locations are located in special text boxes on the side of the page referenced by these characters)), ID does a lot of straining during the reflow process, and CS4 at least sometimes makes me wait too much.

     

    Would a 64-bit engine make these processes instantaneous? Of course not, but I believe it would be more efficient. I get very impatient when I have to sit and waste time waiting for the software to do its job. Anything that can move the process along will be helpful. My experience with the 32-bit Cyberlink video processing program vs the 64-bit version has convinced me that all major software programs like ID and Cyberlink need to move to 64 bit asap. 32 bit software is fine for small programs, but it just doesn't have the ability to access memory and work quickly like native 64 bit programs.

     

    Looking at your comment from another angle: haven't we heard this before? I remember during the late 90s that people said much the same thing about 16 bit, then 32-bit software: "it's good enough", "Why do we need 64 bit?" and etc. My response is that Adobe needs to get moving and start providing leading-edge software with the fastest possible speeds, and stop trying to make their customers fit into their "box". Give people products that they want to buy, and Adobe will prosper. Give people products that Adobe "thinks" people want, and Adobe just might lose customers to their competitors, who are only too happy to take Adobe's market share. I hope that helps.

     

    And btw, I apologize for the rudeness of my first post. It was uncalled for.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 12:30 PM   in reply to PhiBible

    I doubt you'd see any speed difference at all. At 32-bit ID can address nearly 4 gb of memory, so I suspect there's not a whole ot of paging going on now.

     
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    Jan 31, 2013 12:51 PM   in reply to Peter Spier

    You could also set up an object style.

     

    Bob

     
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