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gradient reflection masking angle

Jun 23, 2012 7:30 PM

hello photoshopers

 

im trying to figure out the right way to add a gradient mask but on an angle on my image.

i have cut out batman and trying to give him a reflection.i have made 2 reflections using gradient mask

the 1st one is just vertical flipped and i have added a gradientr mask,the 2nd  image i flipped the image

and added a gradient mask,but i also used the skew and distort,but the foot looks a bit odd,due to the skewing

and distortion.is there a better technique to achieve a better and more realistic reflection?

 

thank you.

 

 

uploadtoadobe.jpg

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 3:05 AM   in reply to inquestflash

    It’s called »painting«, I guess.

    If information is missing in an image (in this case the parts of an object that would be visible in the reflection but not the refelcted itself) then one may have to create them to achieve realistic results.

    Though in this case that might also make it seem recommendable to create a separate layer for the cape as it is farther removed than the legs …

    Edit: That is assuming the object has depth and is not just something like a cardboard cut-out.

     

    You could also just try if Puppet Warp on a flipped Smart Object copy of the Layer might not help achieve a slightly better result.

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
    5,839 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 3:44 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    The OP is on the right track when he says Skew.  Holding down the Ctrl (Cmd) key while draging the middle right handle when Free Transforming the shadow layer, will do the trick nicely.  IME cylindrical shapes are more difficult because of the convex shape of the bottle's base.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2012 10:46 PM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    Assuming the figure’s soles are flat on the surface and it does not stand on tip-toes then one Skew will not provide a realistic result in my opinion.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 25, 2012 2:52 AM   in reply to inquestflash

    I would like to offer a method which is somewhat logical.

    The example  shows probably what I'm talking about,

    but I don't have the time to improve the result.

     

    Step 1

    Use one image of Superman

    Apply a perspective transform so, that the feet are on a horizontal

    line. Or use shear (the upper line is approximately parallel to the

    feet line)

     

    Step 2

    Flip vertically and copy

    Paste

     

    mirror1.jpg 

    Step 3

    Apply an inverse perspective transform so that the line through

    the feet is slanted.

     

    mirror2.jpg

     

    Executed more accurately and improved by some trials, it should work,

     

    Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
    5,839 posts
    May 24, 2010
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    Jun 25, 2012 3:27 AM   in reply to Gernot Hoffmann

    OK, I guess we should try and be accurate, and Skew does distort both feet into unrealistic reflections.

    This was done with a combination of flip and skew, but with each foot copied again, and flipped without any distorion.

     

    Batman.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2012 12:21 AM   in reply to inquestflash

    I think the feet could take more editing; counteracting the distorsion of the torso, head, legs and arms may not be worth the trouble, though.

    batmanTestScr.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2012 2:29 AM   in reply to inquestflash

    The Cape is on a Layer of its own (with missing parts painted in) and the body layer has the cape removed – because those two elements probably are pretty far apart near the floor.

    The feets’ reflections are painted.

     

    And you are right that at the knees the flattened distorsion is noticable – also at the upper edge of the boots it’s evident.

    But I’m afraid Photoshop’s 3D features are no help here unless you are willing to actually sculpt the figure in 3D properly in another program.

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
    5,839 posts
    May 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2012 3:46 AM   in reply to inquestflash

    That is nicely thought through Christoph.  I actually looked for an image of a person standing on a reflective surface to get an accurate idea of what the reflection should really look like, but didn't find anything suitable.  At the end of the day, it doesn't matter how good your Photoshop skills are if you don't have a clear mind picture of what you are trying to depict.

     
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